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Messages - G M

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2
Politics & Religion / Re: Sabotage
« on: Today at 06:21:45 PM »
https://ace.mu.nu/archives/401129.php

https://twitter.com/i/status/1490792461979078662

https://media.gab.com/cdn-cgi/image/width=1050,quality=100,fit=scale-down/system/media_attachments/files/116/753/298/original/aa9ad5ad8b55a661.jpg



https://cphpost.dk/?p=138990

Russia, Europe, and the Golden Goose Named Nord Stream
> Matt Bracken / Sep 27, 2022

Today, September 27, "somebody" blew up both Nord Stream pipelines by underwater sabotage, that is, with a submarine/mini submarine/frogman demolition raid. Who? "Somebody." But only Americans watching brain-dead up-is-down 2+2=5 propaganda 24/7 will believe Putin ordered it. Why?

Because Russia controls the natural gas input to the Nord Stream pipelines with valves. They can turn the pressure on and off at will. As long as the pipelines are undamaged, Russia holds more face cards and has more options.

What happened today with the submarine/mini-sub/frogman pipeline demo attack, was that Europe lost ANY chance to reconsider its sanctions against Russia in return for more natural gas.

Now, who, pray tell, might want to forestall ANY opportunity for Europeans to reconsider their sanctions against Russia, as winter sets in, people freeze, and factories shut down, leading to mass unemployment, the worst economic depression in a century, and possibly mass riots that could overturn governments?

Think hard. Ponder. Did Russia originally cut off Europe’s gas? NO. Europe put sanctions on Russia over Ukraine and said, “We won’t buy your nasty damn Russian gas anymore.” But, the option to reconsider sanctions, and buy Russian gas again, was always open. Russia controlled the valves, and was always willing to honor their multi-year contracts and keep selling natural gas to Europe. {Buying with Rubles, etc, as many countries are.]

Now, after the Nord Stream pipelines were blown up today, the option for Europeans to reconsider their anti-Russian sanctions is closed, at least this winter. Only America can send them replacement liquid natural gas, and we can’t send half of what they need by LNG tanker. Way less than half.

So Europe is now SCREWED. Trapped like a cave diver who is a thousand feet from the cave exit, looking at his last air bottle's gauge, as the needle heads to zero. He's not going to make it, and he knows it.

Here is another analogy. A guy you don’t like much owns a golden goose. Every day it lays a golden egg, and you buy the gold egg on favorable terms. Every day, long term contract. You do massive jewelry business, whatever. The deal works for both of you.

Now, you get into a fight with the owner of the goose, mainly on behalf of one of your much richer friends who hates the goose guy even MORE than you hate him. You are pressured into not buying any of they guy’s golden eggs. Your rich friend assures you that soon the owner of the golden goose will come begging you to buy his golden eggs again, because his income has been cut off.

But it doesn’t work out the way your rich friend said. Turns out, Mr. Golden Goose can sell his golden eggs to other people. He’s not going broke. On the other hand, you, the big league jeweler, you ARE going broke without the gold. You are looking at closing your chain of jewelry outlets and laying everybody off. Bankrupt.

Now, is it logical, do you believe, that under any circumstance, the owner of the golden goose is going to break the neck of his golden goose and kill it, out of a fit of pique, BECAUSE YOU REFUSED TO BUY HIS GOLDEN EGGS!?

https://www.zerohedge.com/commodities/damage-nord-stream-pipelines-unprecedented-may-have-been-sabotaged

3
Politics & Religion / Re: Sabotage
« on: Today at 03:51:35 PM »
https://ace.mu.nu/archives/401129.php

https://twitter.com/i/status/1490792461979078662

https://media.gab.com/cdn-cgi/image/width=1050,quality=100,fit=scale-down/system/media_attachments/files/116/753/298/original/aa9ad5ad8b55a661.jpg



https://cphpost.dk/?p=138990

Russia, Europe, and the Golden Goose Named Nord Stream
> Matt Bracken / Sep 27, 2022

Today, September 27, "somebody" blew up both Nord Stream pipelines by underwater sabotage, that is, with a submarine/mini submarine/frogman demolition raid. Who? "Somebody." But only Americans watching brain-dead up-is-down 2+2=5 propaganda 24/7 will believe Putin ordered it. Why?

Because Russia controls the natural gas input to the Nord Stream pipelines with valves. They can turn the pressure on and off at will. As long as the pipelines are undamaged, Russia holds more face cards and has more options.

What happened today with the submarine/mini-sub/frogman pipeline demo attack, was that Europe lost ANY chance to reconsider its sanctions against Russia in return for more natural gas.

Now, who, pray tell, might want to forestall ANY opportunity for Europeans to reconsider their sanctions against Russia, as winter sets in, people freeze, and factories shut down, leading to mass unemployment, the worst economic depression in a century, and possibly mass riots that could overturn governments?

Think hard. Ponder. Did Russia originally cut off Europe’s gas? NO. Europe put sanctions on Russia over Ukraine and said, “We won’t buy your nasty damn Russian gas anymore.” But, the option to reconsider sanctions, and buy Russian gas again, was always open. Russia controlled the valves, and was always willing to honor their multi-year contracts and keep selling natural gas to Europe. {Buying with Rubles, etc, as many countries are.]

Now, after the Nord Stream pipelines were blown up today, the option for Europeans to reconsider their anti-Russian sanctions is closed, at least this winter. Only America can send them replacement liquid natural gas, and we can’t send half of what they need by LNG tanker. Way less than half.

So Europe is now SCREWED. Trapped like a cave diver who is a thousand feet from the cave exit, looking at his last air bottle's gauge, as the needle heads to zero. He's not going to make it, and he knows it.

Here is another analogy. A guy you don’t like much owns a golden goose. Every day it lays a golden egg, and you buy the gold egg on favorable terms. Every day, long term contract. You do massive jewelry business, whatever. The deal works for both of you.

Now, you get into a fight with the owner of the goose, mainly on behalf of one of your much richer friends who hates the goose guy even MORE than you hate him. You are pressured into not buying any of they guy’s golden eggs. Your rich friend assures you that soon the owner of the golden goose will come begging you to buy his golden eggs again, because his income has been cut off.

But it doesn’t work out the way your rich friend said. Turns out, Mr. Golden Goose can sell his golden eggs to other people. He’s not going broke. On the other hand, you, the big league jeweler, you ARE going broke without the gold. You are looking at closing your chain of jewelry outlets and laying everybody off. Bankrupt.

Now, is it logical, do you believe, that under any circumstance, the owner of the golden goose is going to break the neck of his golden goose and kill it, out of a fit of pique, BECAUSE YOU REFUSED TO BUY HIS GOLDEN EGGS!?

4
Politics & Religion / Re: Energy Politics & Science
« on: Today at 03:15:43 PM »
don't forget the "greens" as motivated

There might be some crazy greens with the motivation, but the ability ?

Where has the USS Kearsarge been recently?

"Kearsarge is capable of amphibious assault, advance force and special purpose operations, as well as non-combatant evacuation and other humanitarian missions. Since her commissioning, she has performed these missions all over the world"

7
Politics & Religion / Re: Follow up to the Swedish election
« on: Today at 02:07:34 PM »
Sometimes Tucker has on this super hot Swedish blond who is a PhD or something.  She's bright and articulate , , , and damn fine.

Anyway, she said the recent election victory by the Right was due more to the Muslims no longer supporting the left but instead forming their own party and by so doing diminishing the vote for the Left.

Imagine how wonderful Sweden will be when the muslim party comes to power!

8
Politics & Religion / Re: World War III
« on: Today at 01:46:37 PM »
"I'm hoping this is wrong!"


i dunno but I nominate Chris Wallace to go to Russia to interview Vlad and ask for his response

might me more interesting then ARods love life

that is his next interview supposedly

So A rod :

where has your rod been?

Wallace needs to fall out of a Russian window.

9
https://sonar21.com/more-on-the-referendum-game-changer/

"To date, the U.S. has provided about $10.6 billion in military aid to Ukraine since the beginning of the Biden administration, including 19 packages of weapons taken directly from Defense Department stocks since August 2021.

We can magically create dollars, weapons, ammo, equipment, FOOD and energy, not so much...


Bold highlight from G M's post:

"To date, the U.S. has provided about $10.6 billion in military aid to Ukraine since the beginning of the Biden administration, including 19 packages of weapons taken directly from Defense Department stocks since August 2021."


$10 billion?  [Actual number may be higher]  I hate to say it but wow that's a small amount of money to thwart such a major offensive of evil rival Putin Russia.

The student debt tranference program rounds to a trillion, one hundred  times as much, without even a vote, for no national gain whatsoever.

Oops our national debt just went up another 10 billion while I was writing this, just writing checks to each other.

We've got bigger money problems than helping Ukraine and thwarting Putin.

And no, I don't support endless, limitless amounts, just saying we haven't hit that level yet IF these numbers are accurate.  But, from my secure midwest location, I shamelessly take some solace in seeing Putin's violent trampling on international law and neighbor sovereignty turn into a losing quagmire for him.

11
Politics & Religion / Re: Ukraine
« on: Today at 01:04:08 PM »
I suspect the Ukrainians or the US did it. No one else would have the guts and motivation to do it.

Poland.

The US would be my prime suspect.

https://twitter.com/ABC/status/1490792461979078662?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1490792461979078662%7Ctwgr%5Ecb15c2d8e80bafb1a553ad0ab29cf3b1b972c77c%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Face.mu.nu%2F

If someone with dementia sits in on classified planning sessions, they might say things they aren't supposed to say to the press...

12
Politics & Religion / Re: Ukraine
« on: Today at 12:42:36 PM »
Annexation of 4 Russian speaking Uki states complete. Now, they will be fighting Russia. Assuming that the NS-1/2 pipelines were not blown up by Russia, stronger retaliation is coming.

It wouldn't make sense for Russia to do it.

17
Politics & Religion / Re: Political Economics
« on: Today at 11:06:57 AM »
:|"CNN is garbage".   Right, but ...
they can't hide the fact that this economy is hurting their people, people who voted for this.

And we only need 20%, 10%, 5%, maybe less, of their [former] voters to reconsider the wisdom and efficacy of suicidal economics to swing the balance and save the republic.

As I drive the rich liberal urban, well kept neighborhoods of the Twin Cities, I see no conservative yard signs but perhaps fewer liberal ones than in the past.  Then in the tougher and minority neighborhoods I frequent, I see a few liberal signs, mostly local candidates, but NO real Dem enthusiasm since Obama's first election in 2008.  They know now, these economic policies do NOTHING for them.  Converting them to our side is another matter.

You will get this instead:
https://media.gab.com/system/media_attachments/files/116/616/434/playable/0f611395286397ee.mp4

18
Bold highlight from G M's post:

"To date, the U.S. has provided about $10.6 billion in military aid to Ukraine since the beginning of the Biden administration, including 19 packages of weapons taken directly from Defense Department stocks since August 2021."


$10 billion?  [Actual number may be higher]  I hate to say it but wow that's a small amount of money to thwart such a major offensive of evil rival Putin Russia.

The student debt tranference program rounds to a trillion, one hundred  times as much, without even a vote, for no national gain whatsoever.

Oops our national debt just went up another 10 billion while I was writing this, just writing checks to each other.

We've got bigger money problems than helping Ukraine and thwarting Putin.

And no, I don't support endless, limitless amounts, just saying we haven't hit that level yet IF these numbers are accurate.  But, from my secure midwest location, I shamelessly take some solace in seeing Putin's violent trampling on international law and neighbor sovereignty turn into a losing quagmire for him.

What's the line? "A billion here, a billion there and pretty soon you are talking real money".

https://www.zerohedge.com/political/zelensky-reveals-how-much-us-taxpayers-give-ukraine-monthly


22
Bold highlight from G M's post:

"To date, the U.S. has provided about $10.6 billion in military aid to Ukraine since the beginning of the Biden administration, including 19 packages of weapons taken directly from Defense Department stocks since August 2021."


$10 billion?  [Actual number may be higher]  I hate to say it but wow that's a small amount of money to thwart such a major offensive of evil rival Putin Russia.

The student debt tranference program rounds to a trillion, one hundred  times as much, without even a vote, for no national gain whatsoever.

Oops our national debt just went up another 10 billion while I was writing this, just writing checks to each other.

We've got bigger money problems than helping Ukraine and thwarting Putin.

And no, I don't support endless, limitless amounts, just saying we haven't hit that level yet IF these numbers are accurate.  But, from my secure midwest location, I shamelessly take some solace in seeing Putin's violent trampling on international law and neighbor sovereignty turn into a losing quagmire for him.

What's the line? "A billion here, a billion there and pretty soon you are talking real money".

23
Politics & Religion / Re: Politics
« on: Today at 10:26:57 AM »
Just returned from traveling with some politically varying good friends.  Gained very few insights as everyone is afraid to touch the divisive issues and differences. 

Not to me, but I overheard the most liberal of the group say to another how tired he is about hearing from Trump.  Quite accurate.  The outlets he follows and the people he follows in Washington are obsessed with Trump.   Also ironic since he just brought up the name for no apparent reason.

Another very good friend in a brief exchange about inflation, pointed out inflation seems to be a global issue [as opposed to a Biden Dem issue], then dropped it quickly in conflict avoidance.  This, I think, is important because I can't figure out the economic thinking of honest and sincere people.  For one thing they are ingesting different facts and opinions.  But in this case, the policies are not in doubt, the fact of inflation is not in doubt, so the only thing left is to not connect the policies with their consequences.  If you did, you would no longer be a liberal, at last on economic issues.  THIS is the group we need to talk to.  There is a dishonesty inherent in liberal economic thinking and a disconnect between policies and consequences.  Often the facts are hidden by media, but can't fully be hidden like inflation, failed programs and crime and violence in places like Minneapolis and St. Paul.  One friend's son was very recently car jacked at gunpoint in a nice neighborhood not far from the trouble areas. 

The leaders of the Left are dishonest and worse but don't assume all of the 60, 70. 80 million who are inclined to follow them are dishonest.  SOME of these people are persuadable by events, facts and contrary thinking, and that process takes time and long term sustaining effort.

The two friends on this trip who are most conservative (other than me) have very liberal wives and are not allowed to utter aloud a dissenting word on that in their presence.

Orangemanuel Trumpenstein

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvGmOZ5T6_Y

24
Politics & Religion / Re: Ukraine
« on: September 26, 2022, 10:32:09 PM »
"(T)he US military has demonstrated that despite its ability to win battles, it cannot win wars."

we win only open battlefield wars

not wars against guerrillas etc

while we are trying to keep civilian casualties down
etc.

what good is all our might if we can't simply blow up the enemy to smitherenes
for political reasons

why could we not wipe out the Taliban ? did we try ?

Lots of profits for military contractors and lots of jobs for retired generals on the executive boards of those companies if the Afghan war drags on for 20 years. Not so good for the 19 year old marine that loses both legs to an IED because the general had restricted ROEs that prevented the talibs planting the IEDs from being sniped.

https://media.gab.com/cdn-cgi/image/width=1050,quality=100,fit=scale-down/system/media_attachments/files/116/637/924/original/e789edbc51271190.jpeg



25
Politics & Religion / Re: The war on the rule of law; the Deep State
« on: September 26, 2022, 10:29:12 PM »
Non-responsive.

I'm not talking about persuading the MSM, I'm talking about persuading those whose impressions are fed in part, be it small or large, by the MSM.

If they trust the MSM, they are too stupid/brainwashed to waste time on.

As a wise man once told me, "You can't reason a person out of a position they didn't reason their way into".

26
Politics & Religion / Re: Endless money and weapons for Ukraine?
« on: September 26, 2022, 10:16:04 PM »
"Despite Ukraine’s recent success, it’s important to remember that wars ebb and flow, and this war has been no different. Ukraine may be able to retake Kherson, but its current counteroffensive is not going to expel Russian forces everywhere. Ukraine’s military will eventually exhaust its capacity to continue this massive counterattack, and the larger Russian military will regroup and establish more effective defensive positions.

Nonetheless, the success of this counteroffensive provides a roadmap for Ukrainian forces: holding where they need to, slowly retreating where they must, and quickly counterattacking when the conditions are right. The ongoing offensive has demonstrated that Ukraine has a superior military that can overwhelm and defeat Russian forces, at scale, when they can achieve more favorable conditions. It has also provided a window into Russia’s military status: Russia cannot sustain their losses in this war.

If the West continues its level of aid and support, while Ukraine continues to build military capability and execute a superior war plan, the path to victory is clear. Under those conditions, it's only a matter of when—not if—Ukraine will win this war."

https://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2022/08/23/biden-us-ukraine-russia-aid-3-billion-six-months

To date, the U.S. has provided about $10.6 billion in military aid to Ukraine since the beginning of the Biden administration, including 19 packages of weapons taken directly from Defense Department stocks since August 2021.

Good news for the MIC! How much will it cost, and how long will it take to replace those weapons ?

When General Winter invades europe and euopeans are literally freezing to death, how will that affect the funding and resources sent to Ukraine?

How long can we keep funding Ukraine at the current burn rate?

https://media.gab.com/cdn-cgi/image/width=1050,quality=100,fit=scale-down/system/media_attachments/files/116/395/040/original/08431348794c399e.jpeg



28
Politics & Religion / Endless money and weapons for Ukraine?
« on: September 26, 2022, 09:59:10 PM »
"Despite Ukraine’s recent success, it’s important to remember that wars ebb and flow, and this war has been no different. Ukraine may be able to retake Kherson, but its current counteroffensive is not going to expel Russian forces everywhere. Ukraine’s military will eventually exhaust its capacity to continue this massive counterattack, and the larger Russian military will regroup and establish more effective defensive positions.

Nonetheless, the success of this counteroffensive provides a roadmap for Ukrainian forces: holding where they need to, slowly retreating where they must, and quickly counterattacking when the conditions are right. The ongoing offensive has demonstrated that Ukraine has a superior military that can overwhelm and defeat Russian forces, at scale, when they can achieve more favorable conditions. It has also provided a window into Russia’s military status: Russia cannot sustain their losses in this war.

If the West continues its level of aid and support, while Ukraine continues to build military capability and execute a superior war plan, the path to victory is clear. Under those conditions, it's only a matter of when—not if—Ukraine will win this war."

https://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2022/08/23/biden-us-ukraine-russia-aid-3-billion-six-months

To date, the U.S. has provided about $10.6 billion in military aid to Ukraine since the beginning of the Biden administration, including 19 packages of weapons taken directly from Defense Department stocks since August 2021.

Good news for the MIC! How much will it cost, and how long will it take to replace those weapons ?

When General Winter invades europe and euopeans are literally freezing to death, how will that affect the funding and resources sent to Ukraine?

How long can we keep funding Ukraine at the current burn rate?




29
Politics & Religion / Re: Ukraine
« on: September 26, 2022, 06:22:45 PM »
"(T)he US military has demonstrated that despite its ability to win battles, it cannot win wars."

we win only open battlefield wars

not wars against guerrillas etc

while we are trying to keep civilian casualties down
etc.

what good is all our might if we can't simply blow up the enemy to smitherenes
for political reasons

why could we not wipe out the Taliban ? did we try ?

Lots of profits for military contractors and lots of jobs for retired generals on the executive boards of those companies if the Afghan war drags on for 20 years. Not so good for the 19 year old marine that loses both legs to an IED because the general had restricted ROEs that prevented the talibs planting the IEDs from being sniped.

30
Politics & Religion / Re: The Cognitive Dissonance of the left
« on: September 26, 2022, 04:24:10 PM »
Why Haven't Linda Sarsour, Ilhan Omar, and Rashida Tlaib Even Mentioned Iran's Hijab Protests?
by Phyllis Chesler
IPT News
September 26, 2022

https://www.investigativeproject.org/9263/why-havent-linda-sarsour-ilhan-omar-rashida-tlaib

The same reason Obama hasn’t. They are on the side of the mullahs.

31
Politics & Religion / Re: Ukraine
« on: September 26, 2022, 04:22:52 PM »
Your words placed blame squarely on our military.

"(T)he US military has demonstrated that despite its ability to win battles, it cannot win wars."

Fair of me to ask whether the blame was always theirs or sometimes it belonged to the civilian leadership.

There is serious rot within the U.S. military, especially at the top. It’s the core of the problem. It’s the guys at the tip of the spear that suffer the most because of it.

32
Politics & Religion / Re: Ukraine
« on: September 26, 2022, 12:35:50 PM »
1) Were the various absences of victory the fault of the military or the civilian leadership?

2) Here, it aint the US military that is fighting overseas.  It is the Ukes fighting in and for their homeland against an enemy they know well.

1. Irrelevant. A loss is a loss. We spent 20 years and how much money training and equipping our Afghan allies and when the money and equipment spigot got turned off, they collapsed faster than a Chinese made lawn chair.

2. Again, our Afghan allies had all the motivation in the world not to lose to the Taliban, but they sure did.

Pets.com wasn’t just a bad business model, it’s a bad way to fight wars. Yet, this is how we do it.

We plan on bleeding Russia, but who is bleeding faster?

33
Politics & Religion / Re: Ukraine
« on: September 26, 2022, 10:32:59 AM »
I seriously respect these gentlemen, but since WW II, the US military has demonstrated that despite its ability to win battles, it cannot win wars.

Here is the completely opposed POV.

This piece comes to me with high praise from someone highly qualified and seriously experienced:

===================

Open in browser
Ukraine Can Win This War
The experts said Ukraine was was ill-prepared, ill-equipped, and Russia’s military was simply too powerful. They were wrong.
Liam Collins and John Spencer
Sep 26
 
▷  LISTEN
SAVE
 
Ukrainian soldiers ride in an armored tank in the town of Izium, recently liberated by Ukrainian Armed Forces, in the Kharkiv region. (Oleksii Chumachenko/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
When Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022, the conventional wisdom among military experts was that it would all be over for Ukraine in a matter of weeks. Here was Russia, one of the world’s ostensible superpowers, its military five times the size of Ukraine’s, and with nuclear weapons to boot.  At the start of the conflict, Russia maintained an advantage of nearly ten-to-one in defense spending and weapons systems. Ukraine, they said, was ill-prepared, ill-equipped, and Russia’s military was simply too powerful.

It hasn’t turned out that way.

Since Ukraine’s counteroffensive began nearly three weeks ago, the country has reclaimed more than 3,400 square miles. By contrast, Russia’s offensive in the east gained only 2,000 square miles in the past five months. Ukraine continues its advance via a successful offensive in the Kharkiv region (in which they launched a massive surprise counterattack to overwhelm unprepared and unmotivated Russian forces) and through its ongoing success in the Kherson region (where Ukrainian forces have basically encircled and cut off up to 20,000 Russians).

Then there is the panic in Moscow. Days ago, Putin announced the mobilization of 300,000 Russian reservists while also threatening nuclear war. The draft—Russia’s first since World War II—will force thousands of Russians who had previously served to report for duty, receive two weeks of refresher training, and immediately deploy into Ukraine. Russian conscripts' time of service has been extended indefinitely, meaning they will not be able to leave the fighting when their time is up. It’s hard to conceive of how much lower the morale of Russian troops can get.

All of this indicates that Putin is deeply concerned about Ukraine’s ability to win this war. He is right to be.

It has now been seven months since the war began, and signs from Ukraine and Russia indicate quite the opposite outcome that most experts predicted. So, how did all this happen? 

Success in warfighting is a function of much more than the size of a nation’s military. It is also a function of strategy, allyship, doctrine, culture, and the will to fight, among many other factors. And Ukraine—not Russia—holds the advantage in every category except for military size.

Let’s take each in turn.

Strategy

Since Ukraine’s victory in preventing Russia from decapitating the capital city of Kyiv in April 2022, Russia’s strategy in eastern Ukraine can best be described as a war of attrition. Russia massed its combat power and conducted large artillery barrages. These battles were temporarily effective, as Russia was able to make incremental gains in the Donbas. But it came at great cost: Russia expended massive amounts of ammunition and soldiers to make those small gains.

By August, the Pentagon estimated that as many as 80,000 Russian soldiers had been killed or wounded. They lost thousands of tanks, armored personnel carriers, and artillery pieces, and have expended or lost tons of ammunition and supplies. They also lost at least a dozen generals and countless lower-level leaders. It will take Russia decades to train, educate, and ultimately replace these people. For Russia’s officer-centric military, these losses are particularly devastating as it greatly impacts their ability to mobilize a coherent fighting formation on the battlefield today. Military analysts were also surprised at the health and order of Russian equipment and positions—many resembled homeless encampments more than military outposts.

Ukraine had a very different strategy.

Over the past several months, Ukraine—being a much smaller military—wisely decided to surrender some territory in the East, pulling back to more defensible positions so that it could maintain the necessary combat power to fight another day. That day came on August 29, when Ukraine launched its massive counteroffensive. This offensive has been successful because Ukraine has a superior military by every measure other than quantity. As the war has progressed, Ukraine has also been able to replace worn down arms and ammunition, while at the same time acquiring new ones thanks to its relationship with the U.S. and other key allies.

Allyship

Western aid has been critical to Ukraine’s successful counteroffensive. They’ve been able to strike Russian ammunition depots, command and control centers, and supply lines thanks to weapons provided by the U.S., the U.K., Poland, and others. These weapons include HIMARS (High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems), counter artillery and missile radars, HARM (high-speed anti-radiation missiles) air-to-surface missiles, and other superior long-range weapons.

Western aid has not just been about weapons. It has also included battlefieldintelligence, planning assistance, and training for thousands of Ukrainian soldiers outside of the country. The Ukrainians have put that aid and know-how to work to immediate effect on the battlefield.   

NATO Doctrine

Just as critical to Ukraine’s success was the decision nearly eight years ago to have a professional force designed and trained so it could defend itself from Russian aggression. In 2016, Ukraine committed itself to building a modern military capable of meeting NATO standards. With the help of hundreds of Western trainers and advisers, Ukraine built an army that could execute maneuver warfare involving large-scale combined arms operations by the start of the most recent invasion. One of us was among them, and we were deeply impressed by their commitment to make such difficult reforms.

While Ukraine was adopting a NATO force and doctrine, Russia doubled down on their Soviet-era approach—a doctrine that relies on officer-centric orders and rigid, artillery-dependent formations. As Ukraine built a smaller, more nimble military, Russia continued to adhere to the outdated idea of amassing firepower and armor to overwhelm a stationary force.

Culture

In 2014, Ukraine’s military culture was much like Russia’s today: a highly centralized command structure where all decisions flow to the top. Risk-taking and battlefield initiative were not part of its military culture. But Ukraine learned through its experience in the Donbas in 2014—when Russia overwhelmed defending Ukrainian forces to take control of most of eastern Ukraine—that initiative was required when initial battlefield orders no longer fit the changing situation. Now, when the unexpected happens on the battlefield, lieutenants and captains are free to act immediately rather than having to seek permission and receive it after it is too late.

The second important component for Ukraine’s success is a national culture of military volunteerism. Russia’s active military may have been five times that of Ukraine at the start of the conflict, but few anticipated how significant a role volunteers would play in the defense of Kyiv. Tens of thousands of Ukrainian citizens who were civilians on February 23—the day before Russia invaded—went to recruiting stations on February 24, or simply used their own arms to support the war effort. The Territorial Defense Force now numbers in the hundreds of thousands, and these volunteers have allowed Ukraine to commit most of its active duty military to the current counteroffensive.   

Will to Fight

When the U.S. offered to evacuate him at the start of the conflict, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky is famous for responding, “I need ammunition, not a ride.” The sentiment is common to many Ukrainians. Despite facing what was ranked as the second most powerful military in the world, ordinary Ukrainian men and women have demonstrated a strong will to fight for their country.

There is no greater test of a soldier or a people than war. The story of the Ukrainian people’s heroism is too rich to truncate here, but we are thinking of how thousands of civilians took up arms in February and March 2022, blocked streets, destroyed convoys, blew up bridges, and flooded rivers to prevent the fall of Ukraine’s capital. Or how just a few thousand men and women fought and held down 20,000 Russians for over 80 days in the city of Mariupol, ultimately withdrawing into their own version of an Alamo in the underground tunnels of a steel plant.

The most important difference between a Ukrainian soldier and a Russian one is their determination. Ukrainians prove every day that they are fighting for their freedom, families, and nation. By contrast, Russian soldiers have demonstrated their lack of motivation by refusing to fight, abandoning their positions when in danger, and attacking their leaders.

Despite Ukraine’s recent success, it’s important to remember that wars ebb and flow, and this war has been no different. Ukraine may be able to retake Kherson, but its current counteroffensive is not going to expel Russian forces everywhere. Ukraine’s military will eventually exhaust its capacity to continue this massive counterattack, and the larger Russian military will regroup and establish more effective defensive positions.

Nonetheless, the success of this counteroffensive provides a roadmap for Ukrainian forces: holding where they need to, slowly retreating where they must, and quickly counterattacking when the conditions are right. The ongoing offensive has demonstrated that Ukraine has a superior military that can overwhelm and defeat Russian forces, at scale, when they can achieve more favorable conditions. It has also provided a window into Russia’s military status: Russia cannot sustain their losses in this war.

If the West continues its level of aid and support, while Ukraine continues to build military capability and execute a superior war plan, the path to victory is clear. Under those conditions, it's only a matter of when—not if—Ukraine will win this war.

About the authors:

Liam Collins is the executive director of the Madison Policy Forum. He served as a defense advisor to Ukraine from 2016-2018 and is a retired U.S. Army Special Forces colonel with deployments to Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia, the Horn of Africa, and South America. He is co-author of the forthcoming bookUnderstanding Urban Warfare.

John Spencer is the chair of urban warfare studies at the Madison Policy Forum. He served 25 years as a U.S. Army infantryman, which included two combat tours in Iraq. He is the author of the book Connected Soldiers: Life, Leadership, and Social Connection in Modern War and co-author, with Liam Collins, of Understanding Urban Warfare.

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34
Politics & Religion / Re: The war on the rule of law; the Deep State
« on: September 26, 2022, 10:23:20 AM »
Well duh, but not responsive to my point/question-- How to spread the info in these articles without losing credibility in the eyes of those whom we wish to inform?

Credible, like the MSM?

 :roll: :roll: :roll:

38
Politics & Religion / Re: FDR and the Jews
« on: September 26, 2022, 07:43:46 AM »
So I went to the below link and saw this:

"I am not paranoid about this stuff. I normally go months without using the term "anti-Semite". It's not my normal shtick. But my spidy sense has been peaking geometrically (admittedly without any hard evidence), and at the exact same time I've noticed black writers and intellectuals suddenly appearing on TV to articulately and full-throatedly attack the anti-Semitism of Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano (who scares me a lot)."

WTF?

https://jimleff.blogspot.com/2022/09/blacks-standing-up-for-jews.html?fbclid=IwAR2Evo8ncN4UP4CrcfOSTS28I6QcMokkoDJn4uiq44nMwUGN2gvkXJkNoiM

================

A poster on my FB page:

.There are new books coming out all the time talking about FDR and the Holocaust. It seems that documents are being found that shed light on his administration and his hatred of all things Jewish.

For fifty years FDR has been almost a G-d to most dems. It is understandable, after all he was the leader of the country when the war began, and he led it almost to the end. But on the issue of minorities, he falls short of G-dhood. He did next to nothing to stop the transportation of Jews to the death camps, and in America he rounded up Japanese Americans and put them in camps. Every year from 1933 to the end of the war the US had left over immigration visas that could have saved Jewish lives. Only after the war did the US suddenly grow a conscious and let in Jewish refugees.....

And what did US Jewry do to push for more immigrants? Well Rabbi Wise was the de facto head of US Jewry and he was told to not make waves. "Three days before Yom Kippur in 1943, more than four hundred Orthodox rabbis marched to the White House to plead with President Franklin D. Roosevelt to rescue European Jews from the Nazis. For a cause which on its merits would seem unobjectionable, the march encountered a surprising amount of opposition. The president refused the rabbis’ request to hand him a petition. FDR’s Jewish advisers denounced the protesters. A prominent Jewish member of Congress urged them to cancel the march. Some Jewish leaders publicly condemned them. Why did the march provoke such criticism? Why did the organizers insist on going ahead with it, nonetheless?

In a generation that has seen hundreds of thousands of American Jews protest in Washington for Soviet Jewry (1987) and Israel (2002), a march by hundreds of Orthodox rabbis may not seem impressive. But it was the only such protest in the nation’s capital during the Holocaust. The very fact that it was so unusual contributed to the wave of alarm that it triggered in official Washington.

President Roosevelt’s decision to snub the rabbis was based on cold political logic. Jewish leaders in congress put down the demonstration as a stunt. The era’s most prominent American Jewish leader, Rabbi Stephen Wise, criticized the march in somewhat similar terms. Wise, who headed the American Jewish Congress, the World Jewish Congress, and the American Zionist movement, wrote that “the orthodox rabbinical parade [ sic]” was a “painful and even lamentable exhibition.” He derided the organizers as “stuntists” and accused them of offending “the dignity of [the Jewish] people.”https://associationforjewishstudies.org/.../the-1943...

Wise was a staunch supporter of President Roosevelt and his administration and did his best to counter or suppress Jewish criticism of the president." Only after the war and the full truth of the destruction of European Jewry come out did Wise admit that he was wrong....


https://associationforjewishstudies.org/publications-research/ajs-perspectives/the-protest-issue/the-1943-jewish-march-on-washington-through-the-eyes-of-its-critics?fbclid=IwAR2FoaOCaDrgncRuiVIw5Fxm_Si4J9VzoHtHYROLYR8yfoSgWQTog6PzAyM

==========

Another poster adds:

The Jews Should Keep Quiet: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, and the Holocaust https://a.co/d/9ds1ERW

39
Politics & Religion / Re: The war on the rule of law; the Deep State
« on: September 26, 2022, 07:37:10 AM »
Whoa.

Super frustrating that this comes to us via a site of such , , , unserious appearance.  Hard to look credible sharing this forward , , ,

Just wait for the NRO/Deep State Andy article covering it.

Should be coming out any day now...

https://media.gab.com/system/media_attachments/files/116/560/549/original/8886c1711dc07662.jpeg



40
Politics & Religion / Re: The war on the rule of law; the Deep State
« on: September 26, 2022, 07:29:10 AM »
Whoa.

Super frustrating that this comes to us via a site of such , , , unserious appearance.  Hard to look credible sharing this forward , , ,

Just wait for the NRO/Deep State Andy article covering it.

Should be coming out any day now...

48
The father’s duty is clear.


Texas Father Fears Custody Ruling Could Mean Chemical Castration for 10-Year-Old Son
Jeff Younger wants to block any attempt to move his son to California
By Darlene McCormick Sanchez September 24, 2022


A Texas father embroiled in a high-profile custody battle fears a court ruling this week could allow his ex-wife to move to California and medically transition his 10-year-old son to a girl.

Jeff Younger, who lives in the Dallas area, told The Epoch Times on Sept. 23 that he will fight the Sept. 21 ruling by Dallas District Judge Mary Brown, and vows he’ll continue to fight for his son, James.

The parents have been engaged in a custody battle over James for most of his life. The mother, Anne Georgulas, started questioning James’s gender when he was a toddler. She argues that from a young age James chose to identify as a female, wanted to wear dresses, and eventually wanted to be known as Luna.

She eventually socially transitioned the boy, and presented him at school as a girl. The school supported that after the couple separated.

Younger accused his ex-spouse of leading their young child to socially transition before he could understand the concept or its implications. He said James rejected being female and did not wear dresses when visiting his home after the parents separated in 2015.

“I had a dress at my house, but he threw it in the trash can in the middle of the night when he thought I wasn’t looking,” Younger said.

Younger is concerned that his ex-wife now will transition James medically. He says documents he obtained during court proceedings show she took James to a therapist who recommended the family “explore” gender transitioning at the Dallas-based Genecis medical clinic.

Younger intends to file an emergency stay in response to the Sept. 21 court order. He’ll ask that a previous jury verdict, allowing 50-50 custody and no child support, be reaffirmed.

Brown, a liberal Democrat sitting on the bench for Texas 301st District Court, ruled that Younger’s ex-wife could move James and his twin brother, Jude, anywhere in the continental United States. The judge said her ruling was for the “safety and welfare” of the twins.

The order also said Younger would have to schedule supervised parental visits in the county and state where the children reside.

In her ruling, the judge “ordered” the mother not to reveal their future whereabouts to the boys’ father. And the judge allowed her to apply for new passports.

Georgulas, a Dallas-area pediatrician, indicated earlier this month that she intends to move to California, Younger said.

The move is consequential because lawmakers there have passed a bill that, according to a California Senate Rules Committee explanation, would enact “various safeguards against the enforcement of other states’ laws” that would “penalize individuals from obtaining gender-affirming care that is legal in California.” The bill was delivered to the desk of Gov. Gavin Newsom on Sept. 9 and, if not vetoed, will become law.

The legislation would prohibit medical providers from releasing information in response to lawsuits originating in other states that oppose “gender-affirming” care for children.  It also would bar California state and local police from arresting or extraditing someone for violating other states’ laws regarding treatment.

“As soon as she’s there for a year, my sons will become citizens of California,” Younger said. “And then it becomes legal for them to castrate James. So they’ll chemically castrate him.”

In 2021, Brown stripped Younger of most parental rights, giving full custody in a temporary order to Georgulas, after Younger was late making child support payments, medical support, and interest, as ordered. Then, he only paid his past-due support after the motion for enforcement was filed, according to the judge’s ruling.

Younger believes the new California law will allow his ex-wife to get around a previous Texas court order preventing either parent from treating the child with hormonal suppression therapy, puberty blockers, or transgender reassignment surgery without both parents’ consent or a court order.

In the Sept. 21 ruling, Brown said Younger ignored her instructions to attend therapy sessions. and failed to see his children in the past 13 months.

Younger said that he was not allowed to see his children individually, and had to see them together. The judge ordered him to pay hundreds of dollars for each supervised visit. The judge also ordered him not to change James out of a dress when he visited, which Younger refused to do.

“I’ve told the judge I’ll just go to jail over that,” Younger said. “I’m not harming my son.”

The court also issued a gag order against Younger, forbidding him to talk to the media. He defied it.

Younger believes the supervised visits ordered by the judge were “a setup,” so the observer could make adverse reports about his refusal to call the boy Luna.

“We have reached a point of absolute despotism in the Texas courts,” said Younger, who in the spring ran unsuccessfully for the office of state representative on the issue of making gender transition illegal for minors.

“This is directly the fault of the Republican-controlled Texas Legislature,” he said, noting that attempts to pass such legislation in 2021 failed.

When reached by The Epoch Times, Georgulas declined to comment on the ruling or her plans to movea

49
Politics & Religion / Re: Gen Keane
« on: September 25, 2022, 03:37:44 PM »
https://www.foxnews.com/world/putin-losing-war-ukraine-forcing-annexation-referendum-secure-political-victory-keane-says?fbclid=IwAR3VGK1D8NF4D8wcyDs7xOJXkYb0B8iuYmdnL1ZoCByml2t8Ns95GyB0B0s

What if Putin were to nuke Odessa as response to Ukes going to retake Donbas, which he is now about to assert IS part of Russia?

What if Putin let the winter settle in and then took down the Uke infrastructure?

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