Author Topic: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)  (Read 327030 times)

DougMacG

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ccp

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #601 on: October 15, 2023, 09:00:02 AM »
A physical therapist who does hand therapy once told me the strongest measurement of hand grip she got was from a plumber.

I am sure she never tested a climber's grip

what the elite ones can do is truly amazing


ccp

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Walgreens
« Reply #602 on: October 15, 2023, 09:08:45 AM »
https://www.the-sun.com/news/9330004/

Around where I am Walgreens then CVS are the two busiest and often the most annoying drug stores to do business with.

Even as a doctor I have had to wait over 10 minutes to get someone on the phone to call in a prescription.

I always felt sorry for the pharmacists who answered calls, walk ins, the drive thrus, and fill the orders answer questions, run around looking at the location of what they needed from the stocks, all while trying to be pleasant and not make any mistakes.

I thought corporate abused them frankly.

Body-by-Guinness

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #603 on: October 15, 2023, 10:30:35 AM »
A physical therapist who does hand therapy once told me the strongest measurement of hand grip she got was from a plumber.

I am sure she never tested a climber's grip

what the elite ones can do is truly amazing

The first art I studied was Judo, which does a lot of hand training so you can better grip a gi and such and thus better throw your opponent. With no pancreas any longer I’m a diabetic, while chemo caused neuropathy, which diabetes can make worse. The net effect is I hang out w/ various specialists, including a neurologist who measures my grip strength among other things. Judo it seems has stuck w/ me as I’m told my grip is off the charts.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #604 on: October 18, 2023, 05:40:57 AM »
Far out.

Any tendency to elbwo pain?

Body-by-Guinness

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #605 on: October 19, 2023, 11:28:57 AM »
Elbow pain seems to be one I’ve avoided so far. Among other indignities that have come my way as I’m closer to my 7th decade than my 5th is arthritis, which leaves most joints complaining about something or other. Somehow my elbows have escaped notice, touch wood.

ccp

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Mark Felix and grip and the Beast vs mountain climber grip
« Reply #606 on: October 19, 2023, 05:00:55 PM »
Mark Felix - the Grenadian strong man:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eICtcsd0TvY

Climber vs the Beast (world's strongest man) in grip competition

guess who wins:

https://www.bing.com/videos/riverview/relatedvideo?q=climber+competes+with+worlds+strongest+man+in+grip&mid=AE9C8AB4177093CD22E9AE9C8AB4177093CD22E9&FORM=VIRE

I remember how my father would tell me his father could bend quarters with his hands after many yrs of shovelling coal for Esso.

Then in the 80's or 90s I saw a clip of man on TV show *ripping* a quarter in half with fingers/hands !   :-o

ccp

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ripping coins with bare hands
« Reply #607 on: October 20, 2023, 03:58:40 PM »
Still cannot find the video but I found this:

https://www.rollitup.org/t/my-uncle-could-rip-coins-with-his-fingers.1048492/

I believe the poster claiming his uncle could do this as I do remember (thank God not senile yet  :wink:)
seeing it on some "believe it or not" like show.

Could not remember name of show but did remember the feat.

It had to be this:

'That's Incredible' early 80s, I guess 1982 the year he cites.

The video of the episode is not posted apparently.

Episodes showing Tiger Woods golfing like pro at age 5 and Karate expert knocking arrows shot at him out of the air can be found.







Crafty_Dog

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Moderna stops mRNA vax trial
« Reply #609 on: November 16, 2023, 06:57:45 PM »


EXCLUSIVE: Moderna has halted a trial of a new mRNA vaccine for young people after a suspected myocarditis case
The case, which occurred in a Phase 1 trial of Moderna's jab for the Epstein-Barr virus, will only add to the concerns around mRNA biotechnology and heart issues, particularly myocarditis.
ALEX BERENSON
NOV 17

 




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Investigators for Moderna today halted an early-stage clinical trial for its mRNA Epstein-Barr virus vaccine in adolescents after a participant in the trial developed a suspected case of myocarditis.

The case “necessitates an immediate suspension of all dosing for ALL adolescents,” an investigator at the company that is supervising the trial for Moderna wrote, adding, “Please confirm understanding and receipt of this urgent communication.”

The trial subjects should continue to be monitored for safety, the investigator wrote. About 150 adolescents are in the trial, along with 272 people aged 18-30.

A person not employed by Moderna, which makes the Spikevax Covid vaccine, provided the email to Unreported Truths.

Moderna did not disclose the trial halt, which occurred before stock markets opened for trading Thursday, to investors. Moderna stock is down about 85 percent from its highs in 2021, as sales of Spikevax lag, but it remains among the most valuable biotechnology companies, with a $30 billion market value.



(All Dosing Must Pause Immediately! A partial subject line from the email sent halting the trial. Note the email time stamp - before Moderna stock opened for trading Thursday.)




The Epstein-Barr virus, which causes mononucleosis, is one of Moderna’s leading candidates for new vaccines. The company has told investors it could reach billions of dollars in sales a year.

But the trial halt raises questions for Moderna and mRNA jabs that go far beyond the Epstein-Barr vaccine - officially called mRNA-1189 - alone.

The vaccine uses essentially the same design as Moderna’s Covid shot. Both jabs include a strand of modified mRNA surrounded by a tiny fat globule called a “lipid nanoparticle,” or LNP.


 




READ IN APP
 
Investigators for Moderna today halted an early-stage clinical trial for its mRNA Epstein-Barr virus vaccine in adolescents after a participant in the trial developed a suspected case of myocarditis.

The case “necessitates an immediate suspension of all dosing for ALL adolescents,” an investigator at the company that is supervising the trial for Moderna wrote, adding, “Please confirm understanding and receipt of this urgent communication.”

The trial subjects should continue to be monitored for safety, the investigator wrote. About 150 adolescents are in the trial, along with 272 people aged 18-30.

A person not employed by Moderna, which makes the Spikevax Covid vaccine, provided the email to Unreported Truths.

Moderna did not disclose the trial halt, which occurred before stock markets opened for trading Thursday, to investors. Moderna stock is down about 85 percent from its highs in 2021, as sales of Spikevax lag, but it remains among the most valuable biotechnology companies, with a $30 billion market value.



(All Dosing Must Pause Immediately! A partial subject line from the email sent halting the trial. Note the email time stamp - before Moderna stock opened for trading Thursday.)




The Epstein-Barr virus, which causes mononucleosis, is one of Moderna’s leading candidates for new vaccines. The company has told investors it could reach billions of dollars in sales a year.

But the trial halt raises questions for Moderna and mRNA jabs that go far beyond the Epstein-Barr vaccine - officially called mRNA-1189 - alone.

The vaccine uses essentially the same design as Moderna’s Covid shot. Both jabs include a strand of modified mRNA surrounded by a tiny fat globule called a “lipid nanoparticle,” or LNP.


ccp

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perhaps the first case of anxiety from Greek history
« Reply #610 on: November 22, 2023, 06:26:13 AM »
Nicanos and the "flute girl"

https://www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/02/fear-of-flute-girls.html

here is an audio of instrument that made Nicanos anxious:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aI7YwJ1jBhY

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Magic Pills are coming
« Reply #611 on: November 27, 2023, 01:10:23 PM »
Magic Pills Are Coming
Wearable ultrasound machines and other inventions could reduce medical costs.
Andy Kessler
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Andy Kessler
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Nov. 26, 2023 4:43 pm ET



At healthcare conferences, someone always asks, “What if there was a magic pill?” One that could cure major diseases. What would the healthcare industry look like? Some emergency rooms and hospitals but less doctors and spending? Inevitably, the discussion ends with, “But, of course, there is no magic pill.” So we spend, spend, spend on healthcare, from $1.4 trillion in 2000 in the U.S. to more than $4.3 trillion—18% of the economy—in 2021.

Could there be magic cures? History shows plenty of wonder drugs and treatments. Aspirin reduces inflammation. Penicillin and other antibiotics fight infections. Insulin treats diabetes. Stents unblock arteries. These treat but don’t cure diseases. Plus, two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese, which puts them at greater risk for many chronic diseases such as heart disease and stroke. According to the National Institutes of Health, “86% of health care costs are attributable to chronic disease.”

By now you’ve heard about glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1). Drugs that mimic these hormones, like Novo Nordisk’s Ozempic and Wegovy and Eli Lilly’s Mounjaro, seem to treat diabetes by lowering blood-sugar levels. They also promote weight loss and lower the risk of heart disease. What can’t GLP-1s do?

A friend of mine with diabetes started taking Mounjaro and now, because of shortages, takes Ozempic. He lost 70 pounds, got his A1C levels back to normal and told me, “I’m simply not hungry anymore. It’s not even like I’m full. I used to throw back a whole pizza and a gallon of milk. Now a slice and a bottle of water is more than enough. The food I used to crave has no interest for me.” Amazing. Goldman Sachs Research expects this to be a $100 billion market by 2030. It could save multiples of that in healthcare costs. Patients take these drugs via injectable pens. Pills are coming—dare I say magic pills?

Here’s another magic cure: Israeli company Insightec, backed by Koch Industries, has made a helmet with 1,020 acoustic sources that when placed on a shaved head can focus ultrasound signals to specific spots in the brain. For patients with tremors, including some with Parkinson’s disease, the system uses magnetic resonance, similar to an MRI, to guide “focused ultrasound” to a specific spot in the brain, which it heats to 113 degrees Fahrenheit. This creates a lesion, which miraculously eliminates tremors with a less than 1% chance of side effects.

Insightec CEO Dr. Maurice R. Ferré tells me the company’s “incisionless brain surgery” is in 200 medical centers. Its devices have been used to perform 20,000 procedures that cost $18,000 to $20,000, replacing $60,000 electrode-implanting brain surgery. He adds that the company has 35 ongoing trials investigating focused ultrasound for things like depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Alzheimer’s, and even neurodegenerative diseases like ALS.

One trial caught my eye. The Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute at West Virginia University has been running trials on curing opioid and substance abuse. After putting the ultrasound helmet on a patient, researchers apply triggers for drug use, via images on virtual-reality glasses and scents, to look for areas where the brain “lights up.” Instead of heat, the focused ultrasound uses neuromodulation to excite the appropriate tissue.

Yes, it sounds right out of “A Clockwork Orange”—but it works! I heard of one patient, a longtime opioid user, who said he hasn’t had a craving for drugs in years. A study published in September in Frontiers in Psychology says the procedure “acutely reduced substance craving,” even 90 days later. Sounds similar to GLP-1s and food cravings. So far, 12 people have had the procedure and Dr. Ferré says “there has been no relapse or recurrence of cravings.” A brave new world indeed.

There are other promising technologies. Crispr gene therapy can fix gene mutations for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and coming soon are one-off treatments for sickle-cell anemia. Even cancer treatment is changing rapidly. I paid $950 for the Galleri blood test from Grail, a subsidiary of Illumina. Using AI, it looks for patterns in your blood that can identify over 50 different cancers, even at a very early stage. My tests came back negative. Whew.

And if it found cancer? The same mRNA that quickly turned out Covid vaccines from BioNTech and Moderna is being used to fight cancer, including hard-to-detect pancreatic cancer. Wouldn’t that be a magic pill? Find cancer with a blood sample and take the appropriate mRNA pill before cancer requires expensive hospital care.

For other ailments? Medical chatbots are already here. Type symptoms into an AI large language model and out pops a diagnosis. Google claims its Med-PaLM 2 scores 86.5% accuracy on United States Medical License Exam-style questions. I doubt chatbots will ever be 100% accurate, but they will help augment doctors. And, according to JAMA Internal Medicine, patients think chatbots are more empathetic than doctors 80% of the time anyway.

Technology is changing medicine. Maybe there is a magic pill after all.

ccp

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Ozempic GLP 1
« Reply #612 on: December 05, 2023, 07:24:30 AM »
GLP 1 analogs or mimetics

appear to have another benefit other then diabetes or weight control:

https://www.yahoo.com/gma/woman-says-ozempic-helped-her-184738459.html

This would be huge if pans out.

I am keeping my eye on the what seems like serious side effect of gastroparesis reported on wegovy .

Not clear how common this is at this point but sounds rare.

I used to tell people who asked if the drug they are on is causing there symptoms , nah , not reported.
With experience I now say not typically or reported but I have learned that one can never be 100 % sure the person has some unique genetic make up or along with other factors makes them idiosyncratically
sensitive to a drug or chemical that is well tolerated by virtually everyone else.

Over the years people will say something like they had so and so side effect after taking a drug such as tylenol , then they stop it they get better and then retry it another time and same odd side effect recurs
fulfilling the Koch postulate and making it very likely they simply for whatever reason have some unusual but real negative reaction to the drug.

Never say never with regards to drugs and people I now say to myself.
" Listen to the patient"
they are not crazy.



Crafty_Dog

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #613 on: December 05, 2023, 02:35:41 PM »
"" Listen to the patient.  HeShe is not crazy."

This is very pithy.

ccp

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #614 on: December 05, 2023, 03:30:56 PM »
well I was speaking of side effect reports

I don't know about he/she gender choice at the spur of the moment stuff. :-o

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #615 on: December 07, 2023, 04:57:02 PM »


" Listen to the patient"
they are not crazy.

"" Listen to the patient.  HeShe is not crazy."

"I don't know about he/she gender choice at the spur of the moment stuff."

My use of "HeShe" was intended to correct humorously the incongruity of a singular "patient" with the plural pronoun "they".



ccp

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #618 on: December 24, 2023, 09:21:48 AM »
interesting

but I would note the author I would bet has interest in Coenzyme Q 10 which long ago was thought to help in heart failure but this has not been born out in later studies.

However, I am always open for more / new information


Crafty_Dog

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #619 on: December 26, 2023, 08:17:59 AM »
Oh.

I have been taking it for years now.

ccp

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #620 on: December 26, 2023, 10:41:03 AM »
it was promoted to help prevent muscle pain for those taking statin drugs.

of course that would be too easy a fix ( :cry:);  it usually is not that simple though wish it is.
and later evidence suggested it did not work.

That is all I know.

ccp

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Kelly Clarkson on why she lost weight
« Reply #621 on: January 03, 2024, 09:00:12 AM »
https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/kelly-clarkson-explains-she-dropped-153053567.html

oh come on

we know she is on a GLP-1 drug

so is Trump.

so obvious ....

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #622 on: January 03, 2024, 05:28:48 PM »
What is a GLP-1 drug?

ccp

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #623 on: January 03, 2024, 08:46:41 PM »
glucagon like peptide agonist or mimetics

Wegovy Mounjaro
semaglutide
lilarglutide
tirzepatide

and a few others

of the weight loss drugs we keep hearing about

does not Trump look leaner recently?
anyone think he goes to the Mar a Lago fitness center more to achieve that?







Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #629 on: January 24, 2024, 07:26:33 AM »
I saw this.
Remarkable.
Even more amazing he did not begin working out till he was in his 70s.
I am thinking luck, genetics play a huge role here.

Living into the 90s would be fine with me only if I can function and think like this.
If my destiny is to be in a nursing home drooling in a wheelchair staring into space then it ain't worth it.

ccp

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Dana Farber Cancer academic fraud
« Reply #630 on: January 24, 2024, 08:15:39 AM »


Crafty_Dog

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ET: LDL, Statins, and Oreos
« Reply #632 on: January 28, 2024, 04:27:14 AM »
Harvard Scientist Stunned: Oreos Surpass Statins in Lowering His Cholesterol
In a very specific experiment, Oreo cookies were shown to outperform traditional cholesterol medication in lowering cholesterol.
Harvard Scientist Stunned: Oreos Surpass Statins in Lowering His Cholesterol
Shutterstock/Anusorn Nakdee
Sheramy Tsai
By Sheramy Tsai
1/22/2024
Updated:
1/23/2024


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Nicholas Norwitz, a Harvard medical student who holds a doctorate in metabolism and nutrition from the University of Oxford, has explored uncharted territory in cholesterol management through an innovative experiment.

Central to his study is an ambitious goal—to validate the Lipid Energy Model—a theory poised to transform our comprehension of human metabolism, especially in terms of fat or “lipid” metabolism. He investigates the contrasting impacts of Oreo cookies and statins on cholesterol levels.

Within the esteemed environments of Harvard and Oxford, the 28-year-old researcher faces the daunting challenge of being a “little fish with a big idea.” He aims to make a substantial scientific contribution while operating without the backing of multimillion-dollar grants.

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“Everyone knows the feeling of being so engrossed by a question that it occupies your mind. What do you do when that question challenges everything you’ve been taught? For me, that’s the essence of this experiment,” he told The Epoch Times, highlighting the motivation driving his research.
Understanding Cholesterol
Cholesterol is a term that often ignites passionate debates in health care. Viewed by many as a primary factor in heart disease, it is also acknowledged as an essential component critical for bodily functions.
Central to this discussion is LDL-C, or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, commonly labeled as “bad” cholesterol. LDL is not cholesterol itself, but its transporter. LDL particles are like a delivery truck circulating fat fuel and cellular building blocks throughout the body.

Traditionally, medical professionals have linked an excess of LDL “trucks” to arterial plaque accumulation, elevating heart attack and stroke risks. Given that nearly 94 million U.S. adults suffer from high cholesterol, its prevalence is undeniable.

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In the American Medical Association (AMA) series, “What Doctors Wish Patients Knew,” Kate Kirley, a family physician and AMA director of chronic disease prevention, debunks a prevalent cholesterol myth, “The amount of cholesterol that you eat, doesn’t actually impact your own cholesterol very much,” she explains. Dr. Kirley underlines that the body’s cholesterol production is mostly separate from dietary cholesterol, countering a common misconception.
The battle against high LDL-C has long been fought with statins—drugs that cut down cholesterol production in the liver. As of 2021, the global statins market was estimated at around $15 billion and is expected to reach $22 billion by 2032.
Oreos vs. Statins in LMHR Cholesterol Management
Imagine lowering your cholesterol with Oreos instead of medication. This was the core of Mr. Norwitz’s experiment. He investigated whether incorporating Oreo cookies into his low-carb, ketogenic diet could decrease LDL-C levels, comparing this to the effects of conventional statin drugs.
His study illuminates the “lean mass hyper-responder” phenomenon, a condition observed in specific individuals on low-carb diets who experience a dramatic escalation in cholesterol levels, with LDL-C occasionally reaching 500–600 mg/dl. This rise is often accompanied by elevated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and diminished triglycerides.
Dr. William Cromwell, a seasoned lipidologist, elaborates on this unique dietary group to The Epoch Times, stating, “This case study adds to our understanding of an atypical group of people—lean individuals who have a substantial increase in LDL cholesterol on a ketogenic/very low-carb diet. The combination of very high LDL-C, high HDL cholesterol, and low triglycerides has been called the ‘lean mass hyper-responder’ (LMHR) phenotype.” These traits craft a distinctive lipid profile that, while rare in the general population, is relatively prevalent among lean individuals on low-carb diets.

The rationale for this phenotype originates from the Lipid Energy Model (LEM). This model proposes that reduced carbohydrate intake changes the way fats are processed, which may influence cholesterol levels in those otherwise metabolically healthy.
For lean people, cutting down on carbs means their bodies use more fat for energy. This change primarily happens in the liver, which sends out more very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), a type of particle that carries fats in our blood. Once these VLDL particles deliver their fat cargo, they become LDL-C (the so-called “bad” cholesterol) and HDL-C (the “good” cholesterol). This process explains why LDL-C and HDL-C levels can rise while triglycerides (another type of fat) drop in these individuals.

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Mr. Norwitz explained, “Based on the lipid energy model, adding back carbs and repleting the store of glycogen in the liver should bring LDL-C back down in a lean-mass hyper-responder.” His study suggests that the carbohydrate source, whether bananas, potatoes, or even Oreo cookies, can substantially decrease LDL cholesterol.
The Experiment
In this dietary trial, Mr. Norwitz adhered to his typical ketogenic diet, low in carbohydrates (20 grams per day). Subsequently, he introduced a unique variable—eating 12 Oreo cookies daily for 16 days, adding 100 grams of carbohydrates. During this phase, he maintained ketosis with ketone supplements, ruling out ketosis as a factor for any increase in his LDL-C.
Mr. Norwitz ate 12 Oreo cookies daily for 16 days. (Shutterstock)
Mr. Norwitz ate 12 Oreo cookies daily for 16 days. (Shutterstock)
After a three-month break, or “washout,” to reset his weight and health markers to their original state, he embarked on the second phase of the experiment. This time, he took 20 mg of rosuvastatin daily for six weeks, a statin drug used for lowering cholesterol, all while sticking to his ketogenic diet.

The results were striking. Initially, Mr. Norwitz’s LDL-C level was 384 mg/dl. After the Oreo supplementation, it plummeted to 111 mg/dl, marking a 71 percent reduction. After the break, LDL-C levels rose to 421 mg/dl but were only reduced to 284 mg/dl—a 32.5 percent reduction—on statin therapy.

“The results in this case study are consistent with changes expected from the LEM and demonstrate the potential for substantial and rapid LDL cholesterol lowering by increasing dietary carbohydrates in selected individuals,” Dr. Cromwell explained.

“This study is helpful for lean individuals who experience a significant increase in LDL cholesterol on a ketogenic/low-carb diet,” Dr. Cromwell asserts. “For such people, diet modification (increasing carbohydrates) rather than medications should be considered as the first line of treatment if LDL lowering is needed.”

The study is meant to be a head-turner. New research reveals that low body mass index—not saturated fat—is a key factor in the sharp rise of LDL cholesterol for those on low-carb diets. This insight, supported by top-level evidence, challenges previous beliefs and points to leaner body mass—rather than dietary fat—as the primary driver behind the “lean mass hyper-responder” phenomenon.
Unproven Hypothesis: Constraints of the Oreo Experiment
While Mr. Norwitz’s experiment has garnered interest, acknowledging its limitations is vital. The study reflects the singular experience of Mr. Norwitz, who is uniquely categorized as a lean mass hyper-responder. The results of his experiment can’t be broadly applied to the general population.
“This was a metabolic demonstration. I sincerely hope nobody takes this to mean Oreos are good for heart health,” Mr. Norwitz explained. “Nevertheless, the experiment raises an uncomfortable implicit question about the consequences … and I love uncomfortable questions in science.”

The core concept of Mr. Norwitz’s study, the Lipid Energy Model, is an evolving model yet to gain full scientific consensus. It sheds light on how low-carb diets may influence cholesterol levels in particular instances like LMHRs but does not account for all variables influencing LDL cholesterol across different diets and populations. “It’s not meant to be all-encompassing,” explains Mr. Norwitz. “No models are complete, but some are useful.”

The hope, however, is that Mr. Norwitz’s approach will turn heads and inspire further research. By spotlighting the LMHR phenotype and the complex dynamics of human lipid metabolism, this study may pave the way for more detailed investigations. Such research could lead to a better understanding of dietary impacts on health, potentially transforming personalized nutrition and medical treatment.
Curiosity in Medicine: Challenging the Status Quo
The pursuit of knowledge in academic medicine frequently encounters significant hurdles, notably in securing funding. Many studies are backed by the pharmaceutical and food industries, which can sometimes lead to a conflict of interest, especially when research might contradict their agendas. For independent researchers, finding support for unconventional research can be a daunting task.
“I think funding is the greatest hurdle in conducting this type of research,” states Dr. Cromwell.

Mr. Norwitz’s unique study stands as a deliberate attempt to spotlight his idea around the Lipid Energy Model. He emphasizes that the use of Oreo cookies in his study is not an endorsement of them as a health food or a cholesterol-lowering strategy for the general public. Instead, his experiment with Oreos serves as a creative method to highlight and generate interest in his ongoing research.

“I’m in an environment surrounded by the world’s top experts. How could I see something they don’t? How can I pursue this question without the established academic muscle or the funding to make a large-scale experiment happen?” Mr. Norwitz’s questions highlight the challenges faced by researchers with innovative ideas but limited resources.

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This experiment is more than just a scientific inquiry—it’s a call to ignite curiosity within the medical field. Mr. Norwitz aims to bring attention to a model that could revolutionize our understanding of cholesterol management for the general population. “What I want people to walk away with is a feeling of curiosity,” he says. “One of the greatest pleasures in life is when reality defies your expectations, and you’re like an infant seeing the world anew.”

In an arena frequently influenced by industry-sponsored studies, Mr. Norwitz’s research underscores the value of independent investigation and the role of curiosity in propelling medical science forward. His efforts highlight the necessity for varied sources of research funding, promoting an expansive examination of concepts that may profoundly impact public health.


ccp

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #635 on: February 02, 2024, 03:30:14 PM »
 :-o :-o :-o

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ET: Blood Pressure and Potassium
« Reply #636 on: February 03, 2024, 05:25:50 AM »
Simple Solution for High Blood Pressure–Why Isn’t Everyone on Board?
While enriching salt with potassium could improve widespread hypertension, the recommendations continue to spark medical community debates.
Simple Solution for High Blood Pressure–Why Isn’t Everyone on Board?
(fizkes/Shutterstock)
Sheramy Tsai
By Sheramy Tsai
2/1/2024
Updated:
2/1/2024


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Amid prevalent high-sodium diets and widespread hypertension, international experts propose a straightforward solution: incorporating potassium into everyday table salt.

This method involves replacing part of sodium chloride in regular salt with potassium chloride. Experts believe it could significantly impact blood pressure control while maintaining familiar taste.

While there’s advocacy for integrating potassium-enriched salt into global hypertension guidelines, the recommendations continue to spark medical community debates.
The Silent Epidemic of High Blood Pressure
The United States faces a critical high blood pressure crisis, with a 2023 American Heart Association report indicating that it affects half of Americans 20 and over. Far more than just high medical readings, high blood pressure severely damages arteries and precedes heart disease, stroke, and other serious health problems.
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This issue’s global magnitude is similarly distressing. Dr. Tom Frieden, president and chief executive officer of Resolve to Save Lives, emphasized in a press release that hypertension cases have doubled in 30 years to roughly 1.3 billion. “High blood pressure kills more than ten million people every year—almost 20 people every minute,” he said. “Twenty percent of these deaths can be linked to a single culprit: eating too much salt.”

These statistics highlight the need for practical solutions to address this escalating health threat. The international struggle against the surge of hypertension-related issues increasingly centers on dietary elements—notably the widespread high salt consumption—as critical areas of focus in the global health battle.
Sodium and Potassium: Key Players in Blood Pressure Regulation
The delicate balance between sodium and potassium is crucial in managing blood pressure. Each cell in the human body relies on these minerals for proper functioning, with their interplay being vital for overall health.
Professor Alta Schutte, a hypertension management expert, explains this crucial relationship. “Practically every human cell needs both sodium and potassium to maintain normal cell function. When sodium is pumped out of the cell, potassium is pumped into the cell,” she told the Epoch Times. “An imbalance in potassium will, therefore, have adverse health consequences.”

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Dr. Bruce Neal, a UK-trained physician and executive director at The George Institute, Australia, expands on this. “Humans evolved on diets that had about 0.5 grams of sodium and about 10 grams of potassium per day. Current diets contain about ten times as much sodium and one-third the quantity of potassium,” he told The Epoch Times.

The balance between these minerals is frequently disrupted in modern, highly processed diets, leading to higher blood pressure. Excessive sodium causes water retention, raising blood volume and arterial pressure. Conversely, potassium counteracts sodium’s effects and eases blood vessels, thereby reducing blood pressure.
The Global Push for Potassium-Enriched Salt
Research in the journal Hypertension reveals a notable discrepancy in global hypertension treatment standards. Analysis of 32 international guidelines showed a concerning inconsistency: all advise lowering sodium intake, yet few suggest boosting potassium levels or explicitly recommend potassium-enriched salt.
Dr. Neal emphasizes the practical benefits of potassium-enriched salt. “Reducing sodium and supplementing potassium both lower blood pressure. Potassium-enriched salt does the two together,” he notes. He acknowledges the challenges in cutting back on regular salt, which involves altering cooking, seasoning, and shopping habits.“Potassium-enriched salt looks, behaves, and tastes just like regular salt. And people can make the switch much more easily,” he asserts.

Ms. Schutte expands on this, stating, “Key challenges are that the general public, governments, and health care providers are not aware of this ‘easy’ solution that could have profound population health benefits.” She also addresses the difficulty in sourcing potassium and the limited availability of salt substitutes in economically disadvantaged regions.

The research highlights the struggle to reduce dietary sodium and boost potassium consumption, hampered by ingrained consumer habits and food industry resistance. Ms. Schutte stresses the importance of recent evidence and clinical trials backing salt substitutes, underscoring the necessity for guideline committees to consider these findings.

The authors propose revising blood pressure management guidelines to endorse potassium-enriched salt (approximately 75 percent sodium chloride and 25 percent potassium chloride) for those with hypertension, barring individuals with advanced kidney issues or those on potassium-related drugs. This recommendation also extends to the general populace, assuming no adverse effects on those with potentially unrecognized advanced kidney disease.

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These recommendations follow a recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposal advocating a shift from traditional to lower-sodium salt alternatives. “By providing manufacturers another tool to decrease sodium in food production, we aim to lower Americans’ risk of conditions such as hypertension, which is intrinsically linked to heart disease and stroke,” stated FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert M. Califf in a press release.
The momentum for potassium-enriched salt substitutes is pulling manufacturers into the dialogue. Ms. Schutte reports that The George Institute for Global Health has initiated talks with manufacturers about the significance of producing and integrating salt substitutes in foods, also addressing production barriers. “For some of the major companies, this is a priority, but it will take more global effort to push this agenda forward,” she stated.

“A global switch to using potassium-enriched salt would immediately lower average global blood pressures, and blood pressure is the single biggest cause of premature death worldwide,” asserts Dr. Neal. He references a study he led, suggesting this change could avert nearly a million strokes and heart attacks each year.
The Risk of Potassium Overload in Vulnerable Populations
The proposition of adding potassium to table salt has its critics. Central to the debate is the safety of this method, especially for those with kidney disease.
Dr. Stephen Fadam, MD, a nephrologist and chair of the American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) medical advisory board, underscores kidney patients’ distinct challenges. “Patients with kidney disease, and especially diabetics, may have an impaired ability to secrete potassium, and this is further complicated by some of the medications that are recommended,” he explains in an email to the Epoch Times.

Dr. Fadam emphasizes the necessity of customizing dietary advice for kidney patients and advocates for detailed dialogues among nephrologists, renal dietitians, and patients. He advises, “This study needs to be taken in the context of what is best for kidney patients, and further discussions involving kidney doctors, renal dietitians, and patients should occur before the FDA considers this research as evidence for potential regulatory action,” emphasizing the need for a cautious approach in translating this research into practice.

Paul Conway, chair of Policy and Global Affairs for the AAKP and a kidney transplant recipient, criticizes the study for neglecting key concerns. Speaking to The Epoch Times, he remarks that the researchers “missed an important opportunity to raise awareness about the overall lack of kidney disease screening and how many people likely suffer from undiagnosed disease.”

Mr. Conway urges the FDA to engage with the kidney community before endorsing such salt alternatives, highlighting the need to protect kidney patients and taxpayers from potential health policy oversights.

Dr. Stephen P. Juraschek, a primary care physician specializing in heart disease epidemiology, responded to concerns about potassium-enriched salt substitutes. “The level of replacement in potassium-enriched salt is modest and unlikely to cause hyperkalemia in most adults,” he told The Epoch Times. He acknowledges, however, the critical need for consistent health monitoring in individuals with kidney disease or on hypertension medications.

Dr. Juraschek also pointed out that the study referenced by Dr. Neal didn’t indicate a significant hyperkalemia risk from potassium replacement, implying that the health advantages could surpass the risks for most individuals.
Beyond Salt: Addressing the Root Causes of Hypertension
The debate also extends to the broader issue of addressing hypertension’s root causes. Critics argue that focusing on modifying salt composition might be a superficial solution, diverting attention from more fundamental problems associated with modern lifestyles.
James DiNicolantonio, a cardiovascular research scientist and author of “The Salt Fix,” shared his reservations about salt substitutes with the Epoch Times. “When it comes to high blood pressure, the two best things people can do is eat whole, nutritious foods and exercise.” He argued that in this context, increased salt intake is often necessary.

Mr. DiNicolantonio identified salt retention as the core issue, usually resulting from excessive refined carbohydrates and sugar intake. He advised, “The goal should be to limit the refined carbohydrates so people can eat a normal salt intake,” highlighting its importance for various bodily functions, including exercise performance and energy levels.

Additionally, Mr. DiNicolantonio remarked that a diet abundant in whole foods naturally boosts potassium levels, possibly rendering the addition of potassium to salt redundant. Such foods include avocados, spinach, potatoes, squash, and certain beans.

Indeed, health experts believe that about 80 percent of chronic diseases could be prevented by changes in diet and lifestyle. This figure indicates that interventions ought to be more holistic, addressing not only salt intake but also the broader lifestyle and dietary factors influencing hypertension.
The discussion raises questions about the role of processed foods in modern diets. Adding another mineral to such foods could be perceived as a mere band-aid over a larger issue—the pervasive consumption of these foods themselves.

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Dr. Juraschek highlights the combined impact of diet and lifestyle modifications. He explains, “The DASH-Sodium trial demonstrated that sodium reduction independently lowered blood pressure regardless of the overall healthy dietary pattern. The effects of combining a healthy diet (the DASH diet) with sodium reduction were even greater. Both of these strategies are important and synergistic for blood pressure reduction, and one should not replace the other.”

Dr. Juraschek recommends a combined approach, suggesting that policy changes favoring potassium-enriched salt in food preparation and as a table option could greatly benefit public health, alongside a continued emphasis on promoting healthy lifestyles. His viewpoint contributes to the broader discussion, underscoring the need for a multi-pronged strategy to address hypertension, which merges dietary advancements with essential lifestyle modifications.

ccp

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #637 on: February 03, 2024, 08:43:03 AM »
interesting thought

exchanging potassium for sodium would be dangerous for those with moderate to severe kidney disease.
underperforming kidneys results in the body being unable to excrete excess K+.

one can by "salt substitute" in the stores
it is a misnomer in a way because it is not salt substitute but sodium substitute with potassium salt.

If I recall I tried it once, and was to me at least, not as good.

Back in 1986 we had a patient in the hospital who had diabetes and moderate to severe kidney disease.  Elevated potassium is always a concern because one can drop dead from it.
We noticed his potassium kept going up and could not figure out why.  Finally, someone realized he used salt substitute on his hospital food brought in by relative.  We advised him to stop and his K+ went down.

2 yr later I had a morning report in a different teaching program where all the residents and some professors would discuss cases for teaching purposes.

The case one day was a patient who had elevated K+ and no one could figure out why.

I rose my hand and asked if patient was taking salt substitute especially since he had renal disease this could well be the culprit .  Many scoffed and the resident presenting the case rolled his eyes and basically said this was ridiculous (maybe embarrassed he did not think of it)

Someone turned to an attending nephrologist who said that indeed this can be a REAL problem and they do see it.
Another attending, a really great rheumatologist admitted he did not know that and was impressed with my bringing it up.
I had my 30 seconds of fame and ego stroking.

The presenting resident of course ignored it.  Why he couldn't just say 'great idea', and I will have to look into it as possible cause could only be explained by his ego.



 
« Last Edit: February 03, 2024, 09:36:54 AM by ccp »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Health Thread (nutrition, medical, longevity, etc)
« Reply #638 on: February 03, 2024, 08:57:48 AM »
Good follow up to my post-- thank you.

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Injection Delays Aging?
« Reply #639 on: February 05, 2024, 05:44:47 PM »
This may bear watching:

A One-and-Done Injection to Slow Aging? New Study in Mice Opens the Possibility
Singularity Hub / by Shelly Fan / February 05, 2024 at 04:32PM
A preventative anti-aging therapy seems like wishful thinking.

Yet a new study led by Dr. Corina Amor Vegas at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory describes a treatment that brings the dream to life—at least for mice. Given a single injection in young adulthood, they aged more slowly compared to their peers.

By the equivalent of roughly 65 years of age in humans, the mice were slimmer, could better regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, and had lower inflammation and a more youthful metabolic profile. They even kept up their love for running, whereas untreated seniors turned into couch potatoes.

The shot is made up of CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T cells. These cells are genetically engineered from the body’s T cells—a type of immune cell adept at hunting down particular targets in the body.

CAR T cells first shot to fame as a revolutionary therapy for previously untreatable blood cancers. They’re now close to tackling other medical problems, such as autoimmune disorders, asthma, liver and kidney diseases, and even HIV.

The new study took a page out of CAR T’s cancer-fighting playbook. But instead of targeting cancer cells, they engineered them to hunt down and destroy senescent cells, a type of cell linked to age-related health problems. Often dubbed “zombie cells,” they accumulate with age and pump out a toxic chemical brew that damages surrounding tissues. Zombie cells have been in the crosshairs of longevity researchers and investors alike. Drugs that destroy the cells called senolytics are now a multi-billion-dollar industry.

The new treatment, called senolytic CAR T, also turned back the clock when given to elderly mice. Like humans, the risk of diabetes increases with age in mice. By clearing out zombie cells in multiple organs, the mice could handle sugar rushes without a hitch. Their metabolism improved, and they began jumping around and running like much younger mice.

“If we give it to aged mice, they rejuvenate. If we give it to young mice, they age slower. No other therapy right now can do this,” said Amor Vegas in a press release.

The Walking Dead

Zombie cells aren’t always evil.

They start out as regular cells. As damage to their DNA and internal structures accumulates over time, the body “locks” the cells into a special state called senescence. When young, this process helps prevent cells from turning cancerous by limiting their ability to divide. Although still living, the cells can no longer perform their usual jobs. Instead, they release a complex cocktail of chemicals that alerts the body’s immune system—including T cells—to clear them out. Like spring cleaning, this helps keep the body functioning normally.

With age, however, zombie cells linger. They amp up inflammation, leading to age-related diseases such as cancer, tissue scarring, and blood vessel and heart conditions. Senolytics—drugs that destroy these cells—improve these conditions and increase life span in mice.

But like a pill of Advil, senolytics don’t last long inside the body. To keep zombie cells at bay, repeated doses are likely necessary.

A Perfect Match

Here’s where CAR T cells come in. Back in 2020, Amor Vegas and colleagues designed a “living” senolytic T cell that tracks down and kills zombie cells.

All cells are dotted with protein “beacons” that stick out from their surfaces. Different cell types have unique assortments of these proteins. The team found a protein “beacon” on zombie cells called uPAR. The protein normally occurs at low levels in most organs, but it ramps up in zombie cells, making it a perfect target for senolytic CAR T cells.

In a test, the therapy eliminated senescent cells in mouse models with liver and lung cancers. But surprisingly, the team also found that young mice receiving the treatment had better liver health and metabolism—both of which contribute to age-related diseases.

Can a similar treatment also extend health during aging?

A Living Anti-Aging Drug

The team first injected senolytic CAR T cells into elderly mice aged the equivalent of roughly 65 human years old. Within 20 days, they had lower numbers of zombie cells throughout their bodies, particularly in their livers, fatty tissues, and pancreases. Inflammation levels caused by zombie cells went down, and the mice’s immune profiles reversed to a more youthful state.

In both mice and humans, metabolism tends to go haywire with age. Our ability to handle sugars and insulin decreases, which can lead to diabetes.

With senolytic CAR T therapy, the elderly mice could regulate their blood sugar levels far better than non-treated peers. They also had lower baseline insulin levels after fasting, which rapidly increased when given a sugary treat—a sign of a healthy metabolism.

A potentially dangerous side effect of CAR T is an overzealous immune response. Although the team saw signs of the side effect in young animals at high doses, lowering the amount of the therapy was safe and effective in elderly mice.

Young and Beautiful

Chemical senolytics only last a few hours inside the body. Practically, this means they may need to be consistently taken to keep zombie cells at bay.

CAR T cells, on the other hand, have a far longer lifespan, which can last over 10 years after an initial infusion inside the body. They also “train” the immune system to learn about a new threat—in this case, senescent cells.

“T cells have the ability to develop memory and persist in your body for really long periods, which is very different from a chemical drug,” said Amor Vegas. “With CAR T cells, you have the potential of getting this one treatment, and then that’s it.”

To test how long senolytic CAR T cells can persist in the body, the team infused them into young adult mice and monitored their health as they aged. The engineered cells were dormant until senescent cells began to build up, then they reactivated and readily wiped out the zombie cells.

With just a single shot, the mice aged gracefully. They had lower blood sugar levels, better insulin responses, and were more physically active well into old age.

But mice aren’t people. Their life spans are far shorter than ours. The effects of senolytic CAR T cells may not last as long in our bodies, potentially requiring multiple doses. The treatment can also be dangerous, sometimes triggering a violent immune response that damages organs. Then there’s the cost factor. CAR T therapies are out of reach for most people—a single dose is priced at hundreds of thousands of dollars for cancer treatments.

Despite these problems, the team is cautiously moving forward.

“With CAR T cells, you have the potential of getting this one treatment, and then that’s it,” said Amor Vegas. For chronic age-related diseases, that’s a potential life-changer. “Think about patients who need treatment multiple times per day versus you get an infusion, and then you’re good to go for multiple years.”

Image Credit: Senescent cells (blue) in healthy pancreatic tissue samples from an old mouse treated with CAR T cells as a pup / Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

https://singularityhub.com/2024/02/05/a-one-and-done-injection-to-slow-aging-new-study-in-mice-opens-the-possibility/

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Gentlecure.com for skin cancer
« Reply #642 on: February 12, 2024, 01:24:39 PM »