Author Topic: Immigration issues  (Read 632176 times)

ccp

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AOC brings business to her district
« Reply #2150 on: March 17, 2024, 10:28:43 AM »
so Amazon backed out of building in her district

it is doing just fine attracting new business anyway:

https://pjmedia.com/rick-moran/2024/03/17/look-whose-district-has-become-a-third-world-brothel-and-bazaar-n4927389

ya

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Denmark: Relative Violent Crime Rates by Nation
« Reply #2151 on: March 22, 2024, 04:40:26 AM »
« Last Edit: March 22, 2024, 06:12:00 AM by Crafty_Dog »

ccp

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we should all celebrate the headline
« Reply #2152 on: March 23, 2024, 03:30:07 AM »
Chinese American Joyce Chang head of global research for JP Morgan tells us immigration is good for the country!

rah rah rah hurray!

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/jpmorgan-s-head-of-research-says-immigration-is-undeniably-a-good-thing-for-the-economy-as-the-bank-forecasts-even-higher-us-gdp-growth-this-year/ar-BB1kmZEu?ocid=msedgntp&pc=DCTS&cvid=cd465f6999994ccfa86b23624ec08a3b&ei=12

what about "illegal" do you not understand.
what about 10s of millions rushing the border uncontrolled do you not understand in your Wall Street elite
wealth - sell us out Wall Street schmuck .

Body-by-Guinness

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TX Border Post Overrun
« Reply #2153 on: March 23, 2024, 03:21:38 PM »
TX National Guard overrun by illegals. If this is a trend, it won’t end well. Worse yet, that’s fine by those favoring an open southern border who will use violence occurring in the wake of a human wave to argue TX needs to stand down:

https://legalinsurrection.com/2024/03/biden-border-crisis-illegal-immigrants-overrun-texas-national-guard/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=biden-border-crisis-illegal-immigrants-overrun-texas-national-guard

Body-by-Guinness

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What’s Wrong w/ this Pic?
« Reply #2154 on: March 23, 2024, 05:47:39 PM »
Folks seeking to immigrate legally via F1 (student) visas denied at record rate. So Hapless Joe in encouraging the low skilled destitute to hop the southern border illegally, while his admin denies students that, on average, pay $30,000/year to study here, often learning highly sought after skills that would benefit the US if these skills were used here are denied entry. Talk about government getting it 180 degrees backwards….

A Record Quarter of a Million International Students Denied Visas, 36 Percent of Applicants
Cato @ Liberty / by David J. Bier / Mar 19, 2024 at 2:25 PM
David J. Bier

This updates an earlier post.

Student visas are the primary jumping‐​off point for most high‐​skilled immigrants to the United States. Immigrants study at America’s elite universities and then find jobs here when they graduate—largely through the post‐​graduate employment authorization program called Optional Practical Training. Despite the importance of these visas, the State Department rejected an unprecedented 36 percent of student visa applicants in 2023, surpassing 2022’s record.

Student visas are known as F‑1 visas. Figure 1 shows the F‑1 student visa denial rate compared to the visa denial rate for all other nonimmigrant (i.e. temporary) visa applicants. As it shows, student visas usually had a similar rejection rate to other nonimmigrant visa applicants. But from 2021 and 2023, student visas were denied at nearly twice the rate of all other applicants. The student visa denial rate increased from a low of 15 percent in 2014 to 36 percent in 2023.

In 2023, consular officers denied a record 253,355 student visas. As Figure 2 shows, more visas were denied in 2023 than were issued in 2002 and 2005. The staggering number of denials occurred even as the number of issuances remained far below the peak year of 2015. Even 2015, with far more applicants, had far fewer denials than in 2023. It now appears that the higher denial rates, which shot up in 2016, may have dissuaded some applicants from applying, and the absolute number of total student visa applicants has declined, and student visa issuances have declined 31 percent from 2015 to 2023.

It is important to understand that before a student can even apply for an F‑1 visa they must already be accepted into a government‐​approved university. This means that the US Department of State turned down 253,355 students who would have likely paid roughly $30,000 per year or $7.6 billion per year in tuition and living expenses. Over four years that number rises to $30.4 billion in lost economic benefits to the United States.

The State Department does not separately delineate the reasons for student visa denials but nearly all nonimmigrant visa denials are for failing to prove “nonimmigrant intent” (that is, the desire not to move to the United States permanently). Applicants need to show sufficient ties to their home country that would impel them to return to their home country when their reasons for visiting have ended.

The nonimmigrant intent subjective standard can be enforced in a variety of ways. Consular officers are supposed to only consider someone’s “present intent” not considering how their intention might change if opportunities arise in the United States to stay legally. In practice, there is very little consistency in application.

The unprecedented denials occurred even though the State Department officials in Washington, DC attempted to return to a lower standard of evidence for students that existed before Trump. The Foreign Affairs Manual now states that students “should be looked at differently” because “typically, students lack the strong economic and social ties of more established visa applicants, and they plan longer stays in the United States.” It concludes that “the natural circumstances of being a student do not disqualify the applicant.” This change occurred in September 2021 before the start of fiscal year 2022.

The State Department hasn’t disclosed the denial rate by nationality in 2022 or 2023, but the rise and fall of Chinese students is the most important trend in student visa policy in recent years (Figure 3). Another ground for denial—which is far less frequent but affects mainly students from China—is Presidential Proclamation 10043, a Trump proclamation that bars visas for people who studied at any university that now works with the Chinese military in any capacity.

This order—which is retroactively applied to students who studied at such universities before the order was issued—was the basis for about 2,000 visa denials in 2021 and probably about 1,600 in 2022, though the exact figure is not published. The number for 2023 is not available yet, but while that is a lot of denials in absolute terms, and it certainly deters many more applicants, it would only explain 1 percent of total student visa denials in 2023.

What may explain the sudden increase in denials is the sudden increase in issuances for Indian students. After major delays during the pandemic, Indian consulates issued an unprecedented 130,839 student visas, by far the highest total for India ever. But according to data obtained by researchers via Freedom of Information Act requests, before the pandemic, US consulates in India were far more likely to deny students than US consulates in China. Indians accounted for a record 29 percent of all visa issuances in 2023, so their higher rate of denial could have affected the worldwide average more.

This theory is plausible, but the only country‐​by‐​country visa denial data that the State Department is releasing are for B visas for tourist and business travelers. For tourist visas, the two countries switched places with Chinese applicants now much more likely to be denied than Indian applicants (Figure 5). Whether this also happened with student visas isn’t known, and the fact that student refusal visa rates stopped closely tracking other nonimmigrant refusal rates complicates the issue. But it could imply that the problem isn’t specific to India and perhaps the increase in denials is coming more from China or elsewhere.

The bigger issue here is how Consular Affairs handles visa interviews. The head of the Consular Affairs division in India is Don Heflin. Heflin explained how student visa interviews work in April 2022:

Bring [bank statements] just in case the vice consul asks, but we are looking at this less than we used to. We know Indian families usually find a way [to pay].… Mostly it’s about explaining why this school and this curriculum makes sense to you. It’s what in American English we call the Elevator Pitch. You’ll have a minute and a half to tell us why this [school] makes sense to you. Don’t walk up and recite something from memory about the campus, the student body, and how old the school is.… Listen, I have a lot of Indian friends. I know that your father may have told you where you were going to go to school and what you were going to study. That’s fine. Tell us what he told you. Show us that it makes sense for you.

None of this information has anything to do with the legal requirements for a student visa. This absurd method of adjudicating student visas explains why India has a much higher than average student visa refusal rate even though Indian students are extremely successful in the United States. The United States should not pass on tens of billions of dollars in economic activity from these students just because they memorized their “elevator pitch” on why they want to study computer science in Kansas. It’s totally irrelevant. The administration needs to increase transparency about student visa denials and adopt a fair and uniform policy for reviews.

https://www.cato.org/blog/record-quarter-million-international-students-denied-visas-36-applicants

ccp

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daily propaganda on how the illegals are good for us
« Reply #2155 on: March 24, 2024, 11:14:41 AM »
seems like every day there is at least one headline telling us we should love immigrants (illegals)

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/u-s-economy-saved-by-immigrants/ar-BB1krsXz?ocid=msedgntp&pc=DCTS&cvid=b702a3cee296455a940d62c284dde6a9&ei=7

always from Wall Streeters or liberal sources
recently one by Paul Krugman  :roll:

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #2157 on: March 27, 2024, 07:46:35 AM »
on the illegal to do list

get pregnant then stop at the OB clinic then 9 mo to the hospital

anchors away

 :x

ccp

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Lationos "rebuilt" Baltimore
« Reply #2158 on: March 30, 2024, 06:38:50 AM »
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/latino-communities-rebuilt-baltimore-now-they-re-grieving-bridge-collapse-victims/ar-BB1kN0Rz?ocid=msedgntphdr&cvid=e3eb4e778b064cb8b5fa83eec74fb465&ei=23

no one is against Central and S Americans who come here to build a life.
but my continues question -> what is it about *illegal* you don't understand?

OTOH I don't know those who perished in the bridge collapse were not legal but of course that is not mentioned while at the same LEFT wing USA today tries to use it to further Democrat Party agenda
nonetheless without that knowledge.

So I am responding in kind.


Body-by-Guinness

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Next Up? Double Secret Probation....
« Reply #2160 on: April 04, 2024, 11:22:00 AM »
Repeatedly busted illegals arrested for ... well it ought to be chutzpah but read this and weep:

https://pjmedia.com/vodkapundit/2024/04/04/rap-sheets-like-these-and-we-still-cant-deport-them-n4927885

Body-by-Guinness

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Who has Economic Growth Favored?
« Reply #2161 on: April 06, 2024, 03:45:35 PM »
Native-born Americans left behind as economy recovered from Covid. Immigrants, on the other hand, improved:

https://x.com/kausmickey/status/1776710930950447157

ccp

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800,000 work permit extensions
« Reply #2162 on: April 07, 2024, 02:37:52 AM »
« Last Edit: April 07, 2024, 05:14:08 AM by Crafty_Dog »

ccp

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Sen. John Thune on Myorkas trial
« Reply #2163 on: April 10, 2024, 05:07:40 AM »
https://www.newsmax.com/newsmax-tv/john-thune-alejandro-mayorkas-impeachment/2024/04/09/id/1160383/

of course, 67 votes needed to rid us of this lying treasonous criminal, but a trial would at least further expose him.

DougMacG

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Re: Sen. John Thune on Myorkas trial
« Reply #2164 on: April 10, 2024, 05:45:50 AM »
https://www.newsmax.com/newsmax-tv/john-thune-alejandro-mayorkas-impeachment/2024/04/09/id/1160383/

of course, 67 votes needed to rid us of this lying treasonous criminal, but a trial would at least further expose him.

Right.  A trial would expose him, not remove him.

The article gives the example of how to avoid the trial. Biden could replace Mayorkas since it is the individual, not the administration being impeached. That seems to be the only way out other than schedule the trial for after the election.

Otherwise, aren't they constitutionally mandated to have a trial?  Wouldn't it take 60 votes to outright dismiss the charges? 

Schumer's last act as Majority Leader: whatever they choose, Senate Democrats are feeding a movement destined to put them in the minority. 

Thune wants to be Majority Leader and seems to be saying the right things in this case.

Let's see which affects swing state voters more, Trump's business valuations trial or exposure of the administration's collusion with the Mexican cartels to bring 10 million illegals into our country, including fentanyl that killed more than the Vietnam war,  human trafficking that's now greater than the drug trade, violent crime to our cities and suburbs, and terror and espionage cells.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2024, 06:02:21 AM by DougMacG »

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Denver funding illegals over police and fire departments
« Reply #2166 on: April 13, 2024, 08:53:54 AM »
I noticed all 5 politicians from the mayor up to the governor are crats.
The crats all on board with wiping out the Rs by flooding the future electorate with new voters and bribing them with tax payer money.

 

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #2170 on: April 22, 2024, 10:04:13 AM »
I don't need to hear that "we are a nation of immigrants"
that "my ancestors came" here on and on.....

First they came here legally
Second most were proud to be here
    (A few brought their European socialism with them but they were drowned out.)
    (The socialist party was always minority not a major party like the Democrats now)
Third they received no free tax payer funded benefits from existing citizens

"Our diversity is our strength ".   
Well not without assimilation.

"All the [illegal] undocumented people are a net benefit ."
Prove it.
I see the opposite.


I could go on.



« Last Edit: April 22, 2024, 10:17:37 AM by ccp »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #2171 on: April 22, 2024, 10:11:09 AM »
"Our diversity is our strength " only if "E pluribus unum."   

DougMacG

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #2172 on: April 22, 2024, 12:10:45 PM »
"Our diversity is our strength " only if "E pluribus unum."

Thumbs up to this.

I would add, besides not having an open border, you can't combine open border with unlimited free stuff and attract the right people.

Settlers came here not for an easy life, but because they were willing to do whatever it took to survive and then prosper.  Contrast that with the above.  Some come here today and work really hard today, roofers come to mind, but getting paid 'under the table' isn't part of GDP.  Prior to 1913, there was no federal income tax, there was no FICA, there was no IRS (it was a bureau, not a "service").  Working for money was not tax evasion.  There was no war on poverty, and I assume not much offered for free food, housing, healthcare, transportation, education etc.  You didn't get a free Obama phone.  If you came without money you had to work immediately for your first meal. 

Half of the first pilgrims perished the first winter.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilgrims_(Plymouth_Colony)

No, an open border today is not a continuation of how we started and became a strong nation.

ccp

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Moving from the Congress thread to here :
« Reply #2173 on: April 22, 2024, 01:28:40 PM »
I read Gallagher's case to not impeach Mayorkas and then re - listened to the below Mark Levin podcast referencing his case for impeachment:

Start at the 30 minute mark and listen through the 46:25 mark:

https://podcasts.apple.com/ly/podcast/mark-levin-podcast/id209377688

Levin makes the case as did Congress that Mayorkas is NOT GUILTY of MALADMINISTRATION (as Gallagher concludes) but of HIGH CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS.

I agree 100% with Levin, unless his study of it is incorrect but I doubt it.

Sure we all know Mayorkas would never have been convicted in a 51 to 48 Senate (assuming Murkowski stabs the Rs in the back again)

but at least the case would have been made, headlines, news stories highlighting the deliberate afront to the sovereignty of the US by its own Presidential administration would be worthy of the trial.




« Last Edit: April 22, 2024, 01:31:13 PM by ccp »

DougMacG

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #2175 on: April 26, 2024, 09:00:00 AM »
Interesting to get a beginning sense of where we stand as a people on this.


DougMacG

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #2176 on: April 26, 2024, 09:19:27 AM »
Interesting to get a beginning sense of where we stand as a people on this.

It's going to be very contentious but interesting to see 42% are not in synch with their party on this.

Posted previously, places like Whitewater Wisconsin are border towns now, not just NYC.

Trump won on this issue in 2016 and it's WAY worse now.

The mechanics of mass deportation have not been visualized.  I would start by looking at the welfare rolls and the arrest records.  Let's get the most costly ones out first and the most productive ones out last, if at all.

The start of deportations will slow the flow inward.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Immigration issues
« Reply #2177 on: April 26, 2024, 09:32:54 AM »
OTOH would that strategy concede that the many millions get to stay?

If so, it could be argued that realistically is that all we are likely to succeed in pulling off politically?


Body-by-Guinness

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Big Buck in Servicing Illegal Immigrant
« Reply #2179 on: May 13, 2024, 02:36:03 PM »
NGO are raking it in handling illegals for the Feds:

Nonprofits Are Making Billions off the Border Crisis

Federal funding has turned the business of resettling migrant children into a goldmine for a handful of NGOs—and their top executives.

By Madeleine Rowley

May 12, 2024

While the border crisis has become a major liability for President Biden, threatening his reelection chances, it’s become a huge boon to a group of nonprofits getting rich off government contracts.

Although the federally funded Unaccompanied Children Program is responsible for resettling unaccompanied migrant minors who enter the U.S., it delegates much of the task to nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that run shelters in the border states of Texas, Arizona, and California.

And with the recent massive influx of unaccompanied children—a record 130,000 in 2022, the last year for which there are official stats—the coffers of these NGOs are swelling, along with the salaries of their CEOs.

“The amount of taxpayer money they are getting is obscene,” Charles Marino, former adviser to Janet Napolitano, the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security under Obama, said of the NGOs. “We’re going to find that the waste, fraud, and abuse of taxpayer money will rival what we saw with the Covid federal money.”

The Free Press examined three of the most prominent NGOs that have benefited: Global Refuge, Southwest Key Programs, and Endeavors, Inc. These organizations have seen their combined revenue grow from $597 million in 2019 to an astonishing $2 billion by 2022, the last year for which federal disclosure documents are available. And the CEOs of all three nonprofits reap more than $500,000 each in annual compensation, with one of them—the chief executive of Southwest Key—making more than $1 million.

Some of the services NGOs provide are eyebrow-raising. For example, Endeavors uses taxpayer funds to offer migrant children “pet therapy,” “horticulture therapy,” and music therapy. In 2021 alone, Endeavors paid Christy Merrell, a music therapist, $533,000. An internal Endeavors PowerPoint obtained by America First Legal, an outfit founded by former Trump aide Stephen Miller, showed that the nonprofit conducted 1,656 “people-plant interactions” and 287 pet therapy sessions between April 2021 and March 2023.

Endeavors’ 2022 federal disclosure form also shows that it paid $5 million to a company to provide fill-in doctors and nurses, $4.6 million for “consulting services,” $1.4 million to attend conferences, and $700,000 on lobbyists. In 2021, the NGO shelled out $8 million to hotel management company Esperanto Developments to house migrants in their hotels. Endeavors, which gets 99.6 percent of its revenue from the government according to federal disclosure forms, declined to comment to The Free Press.

The Administration for Children and Families, a division of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, funds the nonprofits through its Office of Refugee Resettlement, and its budget has swelled over the years—from $1.8 billion in 2018 to $6.3 billion in 2023. The ORR is expected to spend at least $7.3 billion this year—almost all of which will be funneled to NGOs and other contractors.
When asked about the funding increase during a January media event, Krish O’Mara Vignarajah, the chief executive of Global Refuge said, “We’ve grown because the need has grown.” The nonprofit did not make Vignarajah available for an interview.

But while it’s true the number of migrants has exploded in recent years, critics say these enormous federal grants far exceed the current need. The facilities themselves are generally owned by private companies and are leased to the NGOs, which house the unaccompanied minors and attempt to unite them with family members or, if that’s not possible, people who will take care of them—their so-called sponsors. The ORR does not publicly list the specific number of shelters it funds in its efforts to house migrants, a business The New York Times once described as “lucrative” and “secretive.”

While some NGOs have long had operations at the border, “what is new under Biden is the amount of taxpayer money being awarded, the lack of accountability for performance, and the lack of interest in solving the problem,” said Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies, a think tank that researches the effect of government immigration policies and describes its bias as “low-immigration, pro-immigrant.”

Consider Global Refuge, based in Baltimore, Maryland. In 2018, according to its federal disclosure form, the Baltimore-based nonprofit had $50 million in revenue. By 2022, its revenue totaled $207 million—$180 million of which came from the government. That year, $82 million was spent on housing unaccompanied children. Global Refuge also granted $45 million to an organization that facilitates adoptions as well as resettling migrant children.

Now Global Refuge employs over 550 people nationwide, and CEO Vignarajah said in January that the nonprofit plans to expand to at least 700 staffers by the end of 2024.

Vignarajah, a former policy director for Michelle Obama when she was first lady, took the top job at Global Refuge in February 2019 after she lost her bid to be elected governor of Maryland. She has since become one of the most prominent advocates for migrants crossing the southern border, appearing frequently on MSNBC and other media as an immigration advocate. Her incoming salary was $244,000, but just three years later, her compensation more than doubled to $520,000.

In 2019, Global Refuge housed 2,591 unaccompanied children while spending $30 million. Three years later, the NGO reported that it housed 1,443 unaccompanied children at a cost of $82.5 million—almost half the number of migrants for more than double the money.
In a statement to The Free Press, Global Refuge spokesperson Timothy Young said that while in care, “Unaccompanied children attend six hours of daily education and participate in recreational activities, both at the education site and within the community.”
The man with the $1 million salary is Dr. Anselmo Villarreal, who became CEO of Southwest Key Programs, headquartered in Austin, Texas, in 2021. (Villarreal took a drop in pay compared to his predecessor, Southwest Key founder Juan Sanchez, who paid himself an eye-popping $3.5 million in 2018.)
 
Despite a number of scandals in the recent past, including misuse of federal funds and several instances of employees sexually abusing some of the children in its care, Southwest Key continues to operate—and rake in big government checks. In 2020, the year of Covid-19, its government grant was $391 million; by 2022, its contract was nearly $790 million.

Southwest Key’s federal disclosure forms show that in 2022, six executives in addition to Villarreal made more than $400,000, including its chief strategist ($800,000), its head of operations ($700,000) and its top HR executive ($535,000). Its total payroll in 2022 was $465 million.

Endeavors, Inc., based in San Antonio, Texas, is run by Chip Fulghum. Formerly the chief financial officer of the Department of Homeland Security, he signed on as Endeavors’ chief operating officer in 2019 and was promoted to CEO this year.

In 2022, Fulghum was paid almost $600,000, while the compensation for Endeavors’ then-CEO, Jon Allman, was $700,000. Endeavors’ payroll went from $20 million in 2018 to a whopping $150 million in 2022, with seven other executives earning more than $300,000.
Perhaps the most shocking figure was the size of Endeavors’s 2022 contract with the government: a staggering $1.3 billion, by far the largest sum ever granted to an NGO working at the border. (In 2023, Endeavors’ government funds shrank to $324 million because the shelter was closed for six months. Endeavors says this was because the beds were not needed, the border crisis notwithstanding.)

Despite these astronomical sums, the Unaccompanied Children Program is fraught with problems and suffers from a general lack of oversight. Because so many unaccompanied youths are crossing the border, sources who worked at a temporary Emergency Intake Site in 2021 said the ORR pressured case managers to move children out within two weeks in order to prepare for the next wave of unaccompanied children.

In 2022, Florida governor Ron DeSantis empaneled a grand jury to conduct an investigation, which showed how the ORR continually loosened its safety protocols so children could be connected to sponsors more quickly—and with less due diligence. The same report revealed that because there’s often no documentation to prove a migrant’s age at the time Border Patrol processes them, 105 adults were discovered posing as unaccompanied children in 2021. One of them, a 24-year-old Honduran male who said he was 17, was charged with murdering his sponsor in Jacksonville, Florida.

“We used to have DNA testing to make sure we had these family units,” Chris Clem, a recently retired Border Patrol officer, told The Free Press. But since the border crisis, the ORR has abandoned DNA testing, according to congressional testimony by the General Accountability Office. In 2021, ORR revised its rules so that public records checks for other adults living in a prospective sponsor’s home were no longer mandatory.

Tara Rodas, a government employee who was temporarily detailed to work at the California Pomona Fairplex Emergency Intake shelter in 2021, told The Free Press she also uncovered evidence of fraud within the sponsorship system. “Most of the sponsors have no legal presence in the U.S. I don’t know if I saw one U.S. ID,” said Rodas. “There were no criminal investigators at the site, and there was no access to see if sponsors had committed crimes in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Mexico.”
Last October, the ORR published a series of proposed changes to its regulations in the Federal Register that will effectively codify the more relaxed standards. The new regulations, which will go into effect in July, will allow background checks and verifying the validity of a sponsor’s identity—but wouldn’t require them.

“It is mind-boggling that ORR has not seen fit to adjust the policies for (unaccompanied children) placements, except to make them more lenient,” Jessica Vaughan at the Center for Immigration Studies told The Free Press. “They could do a much better job, but they only want to streamline the process and make the releases even easier.” The Administration for Children and Families did not respond to emailed questions from The Free Press.

Deborah White, another federal employee temporarily detailed to the Pomona Fairplex facility in 2021, told The Free Press: “Ultimately, the responsibility is on the government. But the oversight is obviously not adequate—from the contracting to the care of the children to the vetting of the sponsors. All of it is inadequate. The government blames the contractor and the contractor blames the government, and no one is held accountable.”

Maddie Rowley is an investigative reporter. Follow her on X @Maddie_Rowley. And read Peter Savodnik’s piece, “A Report from the Southern Border: ‘We Want Biden to Win.’”

https://www.thefp.com/p/nonprofits-make-billions-off-migrant-children?utm_campaign=post&utm_medium=web&triedRedirect=true

Crafty_Dog

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Body-by-Guinness

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Illegals Rent Driver Service IDs
« Reply #2181 on: May 14, 2024, 06:20:38 PM »
Hmm, what could possible go wrong? Uber/DoorDash drivers rent IDs to illegals to get an 85/15 earnings split. Unvetted illegals then get access to homes, info on people they serve, etc:

https://x.com/realmuckraker/status/1790536887343481060?s=61

Body-by-Guinness

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International Immigration Resistance
« Reply #2182 on: May 20, 2024, 09:34:41 AM »