Author Topic: The US Congress; Congressional races  (Read 294546 times)

ccp

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boebert
« Reply #1600 on: January 10, 2024, 02:09:50 PM »

DougMacG

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Rasmussen, generic Ballot, Republicans open 9 point lead
« Reply #1601 on: January 10, 2024, 08:26:23 PM »
Let's call this an outlier but it means they're finding some support out there.  538 says it's tied.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
REPUBLICANS OPEN BIG LEAD ON GENERIC BALLOT

Ten months ahead of the 2024 election, Republicans have a nine-point lead as they seek to maintain their narrow House majority.
https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2024/01/republicans-open-big-lead-on-generic-ballot.php
https://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/biden_administration/gop_begins_2024_with_lead_on_generic_congressional_ballot
--------------------------------
Warning, the big trounce predicted did not happen in 2022.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2024, 10:09:59 PM by DougMacG »

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Ms Colorado/America for governor
« Reply #1604 on: January 15, 2024, 06:19:41 AM »
https://nypost.com/2024/01/10/news/miss-colorado-madison-marsh-is-first-active-duty-officer-at-miss-american-pageant/

 :wink:

she is master's student at Harvard Public Policy !

what a catch for some lucky stud.......and maybe for us.
Wait, I am assuming she is a Republican - maybe not  :-o
oh vey...

https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/us-air-force-officer-crowned-035616828.html
« Last Edit: January 15, 2024, 06:25:00 AM by ccp »


ccp

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Republican majority gets smaller
« Reply #1606 on: January 23, 2024, 05:34:05 AM »
https://www.dailywire.com/news/slim-house-gop-majority-gets-narrower

at this rate Dems could win majority by the end of the year without even one vote ever being casted.

 :-o


Crafty_Dog

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Re: The US Congress; Congressional races
« Reply #1608 on: January 24, 2024, 07:46:40 AM »
 8-) 8-) 8-)

DougMacG

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Hold the House, Take the Senate
« Reply #1609 on: January 26, 2024, 09:41:10 AM »
Hold the House, Take the Senate. (The Presidential race is going to be whatever it will be.)

How do we help that happen from our quiet armchair positions other than send small amounts of money to various key players?  (And we better start doing that!)

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The US Congress; Congressional races
« Reply #1610 on: January 26, 2024, 10:33:43 AM »
Well, I like to look at the number of reads that our threads have.  Seems to me like we have a lot of people who like to be a fly on the wall, finding value in what might be called our curation/aggregation and our analysis.

Also, I have taken to making little feedback calls to my Congressman and my Senators.

That, and the small donations.

Perhaps vain and delusional, perhaps not.  :-D :-D :-D

ccp

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Kar Lake vs Lamb vs Independent Sinema vs Demorat Gallego
« Reply #1611 on: January 26, 2024, 12:22:29 PM »
looks bad in 3 way race for R's

Sinema and Lake are are in 30% and the [c]rat is in lead :

https://www.azfamily.com/2023/11/16/poll-kari-lake-leads-gop-primary-arizona-voters-split-2024-senate-race/

As for the bribe for Lake to stay out of the race - me -> no  big deal

so what.

not illegal.

of course if she was in office then a problem

Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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US Senate and House, Where can WE make a difference? Part 1, Target Tammy, D-WI
« Reply #1613 on: January 30, 2024, 10:27:36 AM »
Get ready to support Eric Hovda (or anyone who can knockout Tammy.

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/senate/2825013/why-senate-republicans-hopeful-taking-out-big-name-democrat-key-battleground-state/

Last year great conservative Senator Ron Johnson was reelected in divided state Wisconsin.  The other seat is one of Washington's most-Leftist liberals, Tammy Baldwin.

It doesn't need to be that way.

Americans for Democratic Action, which describes itself as a home for liberal activists, gave Baldwin a 100% rating for votes that senators took in 2021.

https://wisconsinwatch.org/2023/04/is-wisconsins-tammy-baldwin-rated-one-of-the-most-liberal-members-of-the-us-senate/#:~:text=Americans%20for%20Democratic%20Action%2C%20which,that%20senators%20took%20in%202021.


20 million means 1 million people (out of 330 million) send $20.  Jump in and spread the word.  Or get set on losing.



ccp

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Schumer pushing Plan B
« Reply #1616 on: February 08, 2024, 11:34:54 AM »
https://www.newsmax.com/politics/senate-ukraine-israel/2024/02/08/id/1152851/


95.34 bill

total package

let us see:

   61 for Ukraine
   14 for Israel
+   4.83 for Taiwan/Asia
----------------------------------

= 79.83 billion

which leaves 15.54 bill for undisclosed, I assume pork, and other shyster shenanigans.
(no one would notice this  :wink:)

ccp

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it like the Dems have our credit card
« Reply #1617 on: February 08, 2024, 02:17:51 PM »
they simply charge everything to the taxpayers credit card.

we have to watch the charges like we would our own credit card accounts to be sure they don't slip in unwanted charges

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The US Congress; Congressional races
« Reply #1618 on: February 08, 2024, 03:04:11 PM »
Well, Hamas is getting several billion, , , Seriously!

Body-by-Guinness

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Congresscritters Somehow Curiously Beat the Market
« Reply #1619 on: February 08, 2024, 04:07:24 PM »
I am shocked, shocked I tell you! Do you think perhaps they were aware of some pending legislation that would impact their stock portfolio? Oh, and those noble, nattering, Dems did better than those awful, venal, money grubbing Repubs, go figure.


Stock Traders in Congress Beat the Market Again

The Beacon / by Craig Eyermann / February 08, 2024 at 04:53PM

2023 was a good year for the stock market. CNN reported the year’s performance stats for the three most well-known U.S. stock market indices.

S&P 500: While the broadest measure of the US stock market closed 0.28% lower on Friday, leaving it just under 30 points away from a record-high close, it gained 24% this year, ending 2023 with a bang. It also notched its ninth-straight weekly gain—the longest streak since January 2004. This year has been much kinder to the market than last: The benchmark index fell by about 20% in 2022.

Dow Jones Industrial Average: The Dow reached multiple record highs in December, including notching records in each of the past five trading sessions. It was down 0.05% Friday, closing at 37,689. In 2023, the Dow gained 14%.

Nasdaq Composite: The tech-heavy Nasdaq index was the year’s biggest star, however. Although it was down 0.56% Friday, closing at around 4769, it rose by 43% in 2023—its best performance since 2020. It remains about 1,000 points below the all-time high it reached in November 2021, demonstrating what a horrendous year tech had in 2022—and how much room it still has left to recover.

Of all these, the return for the S&P 500 represents a benchmark that 92% of professional investment managers can’t beat. Certainly not with any regularity.

But, according to the market analytics firm Unusual Whales, for the members of the U.S. Congress who actively traded stocks during 2023, no fewer than 32 beat the S&P’s 24 percent return. Here’s a summary of what they found:

1. Congress beat the market, once again. Of 100 trading members, 33% beat SPY with their portfolios.
2. Democrats beat their Republican colleagues by a massive margin.
3. Members are once again trading options, after not trading them in 2022.
4. The overall number of transactions by Congress is down. They are also reducing time to disclosure, as well as using the note feature, because people now watch them vigorously.
5. There were many unusual trades and conflicts.

The report names several members of Congress who had some unusually well-timed trades and whose committee assignments may be giving them an insider edge over the general public and professional investment managers. Seeing a name like the options trading former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in that group may not be surprising. Still, lesser-known members like Tommy Tuberville, Kevin Hern, and Lois Frankel deserve attention for their 2023 trades.

Within the Congress, efforts in the last two years to pass legislation to curtail such unusual trading activities by elected officials have either stalled or died. There is little sign their backers have enough sway with their colleagues to even get them to a vote.

That’s not as bad as it sounds because those legislative proposals don’t go far enough. Restrictions on congressional insider trading must also extend to congressional staff and their family members. They also shouldn’t be limited to just the Congress. The same trading restrictions should apply to employees of the executive and judicial branches of the government as well.

The post Stock Traders in Congress Beat the Market Again appeared first on The Beacon.

https://blog.independent.org/2024/02/08/stock-trader-congress-beat-market/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=stock-trader-congress-beat-market

ccp

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Hogan to run for Md. Senate seat
« Reply #1620 on: February 09, 2024, 09:34:15 AM »
https://hotair.com/headlines/2024/02/09/new-hogan-to-run-for-senate-in-maryland-n3782649

we don't need another rino in the Senate
probably already kissed McConnel's ring.



Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: A good one bites the dust
« Reply #1623 on: February 12, 2024, 05:47:26 AM »

Rep. Michael Gallagher’s decision not to seek re-election this year is understandable from a personal point of view. But it’s also another dispiriting sign of the decline of Congress as a place where people of intelligence and principle believe they can solve national problems.


The 39-year-old Republican said Saturday that he wants to devote more time to his young family. He believes in term limits for Congress and says he never ran for office with a goal of making it a lifetime career. He was first elected to his northeastern Wisconsin seat in 2016.

Yet Mr. Gallagher will be missed as a rare Member these days who wants to do something other than promote his social-media brand. As a former Marine intelligence officer who served in Iraq under Centcom Commander David Petraeus, Mr. Gallagher has focused on America’s fading ability to deter its enemies.

In this Congress he has chaired the Select Committee on the Chinese Communist Party, a rare corner of the House that has done something useful. He and Democrat Raja Krishnamoorthi of Illinois have worked together to investigate the growing threat from China.

This includes U.S. vulnerability to Chinese espionage, cyber-attacks and influence schemes. The committee has been helpful in drawing attention to U.S. defense vulnerabilities, especially in the Indo-Pacific. Mr. Gallagher has argued in particular for urgently buying and deploying more long-range missiles in the Pacific theater that are crucial to deterring a Chinese invasion of Taiwan.

This military expertise is especially important given the Republican Party’s drift in the Trump era toward isolationism. The House GOP is increasingly dominated by Members who don’t support a military buildup despite the growing cooperation of U.S. adversaries China, Russia and Iran. The Senate still has some traditional hawks, but Mr. Trump’s influence is eroding support for peace-through-strength and long-time alliances even in the upper Chamber.

It’s hard to believe Mr. Gallagher’s decision to retire wasn’t influenced by the continuing dysfunction of the current House. The select China committee may not last past the current Congress, and he’s too junior to become Chairman of Armed Services. His principled stand against the GOP impeachment of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas suggests his lack of patience with his party’s resort to stunts that accomplish nothing.

Congress is increasingly a body for unserious people in both parties. The Adam Schiffs and Marjorie Taylor Greenes play to the cable TV and Twitter (now X) crowds and feed the partisan poison that makes legislative compromise more difficult.

This would matter less if this were the 1990s, a time of peace and prosperity. But the world is more dangerous than it’s been since the 1970s, and probably the 1930s, with rogue nations on the march. The U.S. needs leaders who understand these challenges, and too many talented men and women have concluded that Congress isn’t a body for people who want to make a difference.

ccp

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Re: The US Congress; Congressional races
« Reply #1624 on: February 12, 2024, 05:55:57 AM »
I am always suspicious of WSJ and all those who tell us we need Congress to "solve problems" and "compromise".

Like Bloomberg.

Perhaps I am wrong, but it seems most times we have compromise the Dems win an advantage.




Crafty_Dog

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Re: The US Congress; Congressional races
« Reply #1625 on: February 12, 2024, 06:00:28 AM »
Agree. 

DougMacG

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Senate bill Assistance to Ukraine, Israel, Taiwan, Gaza
« Reply #1626 on: February 13, 2024, 06:25:03 AM »
What, wait, 9.5 Billion to "civilians in" Gaza?  That on a par with Ukraine, Israel, Taiwan and ahead of left out border security? I wasn't the one who paired foreign war money with our border security.  It was Joe Biden (his strategists) who did that.

Sorry, how do we get to the "civilians in Gaza" without going through Hamas and when did our third world cash aid ever not get diverted to the autocrats in the kleptocracies?  Joe Biden and Barack Obama already financed the war against Israel and for some reason want to keep that going, paying both sides?

Sen Tom Cotton:  The Gaza money has inadequate guardrails.  Understatement.  Don't we know 70% of "civilians in Gaza" support the terror?  Sen Tom Cotton again, "we didn't send money to Germany and Japan during WWII", did we?

Because the last bill lacked a wall and legalized the invasion, they've dropped security of our border entirely?  I thought that was needed to get conservative support.  Or do conservatives just cave?

Meanwhile Ukraine's prospects only look bleaker (good money after bad?) and Israel never said it needed our money. President Biden doesn't support what they are doing but wants to send money?  With strings attached?

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-13078043/senate-passes-ukraine-israel-aid-bill-uncertain-house.html
« Last Edit: February 13, 2024, 06:26:57 AM by DougMacG »

ccp

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Pilip NY Post
« Reply #1627 on: February 13, 2024, 06:30:50 AM »
https://nypost.com/2024/02/11/opinion/im-a-34-year-nypd-member-and-mazi-pilip-can-help-solve-our-crises-elections-matter/

Supported by police and retired Congressman Peter King of Long Island.

keep our fingers crossed .   We can't afford to lose this seat to a "career" crat.

DougMacG

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One more Mayorkas impeachment vote?
« Reply #1628 on: February 13, 2024, 06:58:08 AM »
Rep Mike Gallagher said impeachment for 'mal-administration' lacked "high crimes" and would lead to [Democrats impeaching Republican cabinet members].  One could certainly envision Democrats impeaching the next Republican EPA administrator for policy differences, for example.

But does it lack a high crime?

Even the AP noticed the articles of impeachment include lying to congress, testifying that "the border is secure".

Question:  Does that rise to the threshold of "high crimes and misdemeanors"?

https://apnews.com/article/house-mayorkas-impeachment-vote-border-security-80cbd5bbb8f512c6814f155f825a1214

I say yes.  It is a crime, a high crime.  It is blatantly false and it matter of extreme relevance and importance.  It interferes with the role of Congress in oversight, budgeting and policy making. 

Some others lied to Congress without charges, former CIA Director John Brennan comes to mind.
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jul/31/cia-director-john-brennan-lied-senate

FBI Director Christopher Wray's refusal to answer regarding federal agents on Jan 6 is contempt on a par with lying to Congress, IMHO.  Congress investigated this event for two years and still doesn't know what our own government was doing that day because of Wray's refusal to submit to Congressional oversight.

ccp

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Santos seat back to where it came from
« Reply #1629 on: February 14, 2024, 04:54:07 AM »
to the Democrat who he beat.

I think this was a district that voted for Trump so I am not sure what this means.

Perhaps the R , Pilip was not up to the job.

Amazing.  The Dem tied everything bad to Trump and the R tied everything bad to Biden.

Since both have had 4 yrs this could be done instead of one side having an incumbent .

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: The Senate Rejects American Retreat
« Reply #1630 on: February 14, 2024, 01:54:28 PM »
The Senate Rejects American Retreat
Twenty-two Republicans vote to help allies and rebuild U.S. defenses. Will Speaker Mike Johnson now let the House work its will?
By The Editorial Board
Feb. 13, 2024 6:34 pm ET

The Senate’s 70-29 predawn vote Tuesday approving U.S. aid for Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan was a rare bipartisan accomplishment in Washington. This is a victory for American security that would buttress U.S. defenses and hold the line against compounding dangers abroad.

Some 22 Republicans voted for the bill, up from 17 who supported starting work on the bill last week, and the converts include Jim Risch of Idaho and John Boozman of Arkansas. A yes vote took political courage. Donald Trump and his new GOP establishment are campaigning against Ukraine, and President Biden is incapable of pressing a public case for his own policies abroad.

But China, Russia, North Korea and Iran are mounting an increasingly aggressive and coordinated challenge to U.S. power. Some Republicans grasp the stakes and are acting as a backbone to a weak President, in the best Republican tradition since World War II. Arthur Vandenberg helped Truman establish NATO, and Bob Dole supported Bill Clinton in the Balkans in the 1990s.

Deserving particular credit: GOP Senators Dan Sullivan of Alaska, Susan Collins of Maine, Roger Wicker of Mississippi and Thom Tillis of North Carolina. All shaped the bill for the better and repeatedly explained the U.S. interest in Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan—over angry barrages from the bill’s opponents.

Sen. Sullivan was right when he said on the floor that the measure isn’t so much a foreign aid bill as a down payment on a badly needed American rearmament. About 60% of the bill’s $95 billion in funding will flow to a brittle U.S. industrial base that is straining to produce enough artillery shells, missiles and air defenses for the U.S. and its allies.

Yet the vote was instructive about some Republicans who portray themselves as defense hawks, not least Sen. Lindsey Graham, who voted no, demanding Congress focus first on the border. The South Carolinian is now ducking this weekend’s Munich Security Conference, where he’s been a regular, perhaps to spare himself the embarrassment. But the country needs him in a role more useful than Mr. Trump’s political spokesman.

Sen. Tom Cotton also voted no, and on the floor he said the bill offered too much economic and budget support for Ukraine. Yet Republicans managed to cut President Biden’s financial aid request by nearly $4 billion, to $7.9 billion. Europe is stepping up to offer more cash, and Republicans have a strong hand to continue trimming this account.

But much of the rest of the $95 billion is for U.S. arsenals and Red Sea operations, and a no vote heralds weakness against China and Iran as much as it does Russia. Anyone who thinks a fight over Taiwan is coming should be rushing to pass $2 billion in weapons sales and training for Pacific partners. The bill also includes billions to produce 100,000 155mm artillery rounds per month. Ukraine is voraciously consuming shells, but 155mm is important to Israel, Taiwan and U.S. forces on the Korean peninsula.

Wherever the U.S. fights, troops need air cover, and the measure helps grow Patriot missile production to 650 a year, from 550 now. The U.S. is expending Tomahawk missiles in the Middle East and needs more of its best weapons in the Pacific. The bill devotes $133 million to expanding production of rocket motors that feed cruise missiles.

***
Next up is the House, and Speaker Mike Johnson said this week the body will “continue to work its own will on these important matters.” If he means it, he won’t let the GOP’s isolationist wing block the will of the House majority that supports Ukraine. The supporters include half the Republicans, and critics can offer amendments. Mr. Johnson ascended to power as an affable patriot, and he can’t dodge this test of his leadership and convictions.

If Mr. Johnson blocks a vote, he and Republicans will bear responsibility for what comes next—in Ukraine and elsewhere. The world will absorb the lesson that the U.S. is unprepared to provide weapons for allies willing to fight in their own defense against a marauding dictator, as the Ukrainians have done with valor and at great cost.

Seventy Senators are on record opposing a diminished America in a world that is more dangerous than it’s been in decades. House Republicans now face a test of what they believe, and the stakes couldn’t be higher.

DougMacG

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Re: WSJ: The Senate Rejects American Retreat
« Reply #1631 on: February 15, 2024, 06:10:56 AM »
I am generally a big fan of the wsj editorial board and also generally hawkish on military preparedness but this piece is very unfair IMHO.

If it is so important to get the good parts of this done why is so much objectionable BS thrown in with it and such important things left out, then all the blame thrown on those left out of the negotiations?

Funding Hamas negates the good part with Israel, the Ukraine part is without oversight and strategy, and It was Biden who tied foreign military aid to our border security, then they go ahead wit no border security and expect full support, like our memory is as short as his. Not so. The otherwise good opinionators skip over the defects and put all blame on one side.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2024, 06:31:17 AM by DougMacG »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The US Congress; Congressional races
« Reply #1632 on: February 15, 2024, 06:16:23 AM »
Doug:

I agree with you and probably should have specified the points you make when I posted it.

DougMacG

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US Congress; Congressional races, That NY-3 Race
« Reply #1633 on: February 16, 2024, 12:18:39 PM »
Let's see the candidate who was pro tax cut and for securing the border won.

I wish the whole Dem party was that way!

https://news.yahoo.com/democrats-themselves-victory-york-problem-161624581.html

Not so much for recent Dem races down ballot in NY-3:

"In just the last three years, Republicans have swept every major office in the county, filling high-profile posts and hundreds of patronage jobs with party regulars..."
 - https://www.nytimes.com/2024/02/12/nyregion/republicans-nassau-pilip-santos.html

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Re: The US Congress; Congressional races
« Reply #1635 on: February 20, 2024, 02:40:40 AM »
Don't know if this means much but real clear politics on 2024 Congress:

https://www.realclearpolling.com/polls/state-of-the-union/2024/generic-congressional-vote

Does Trump help hurt or make no difference?
Same can be asked about Biden.