Author Topic: The Politics of Health Care  (Read 668227 times)

ccp

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senate confirms election of partisan lawyer to lead HHS
« Reply #1800 on: March 18, 2021, 12:55:58 PM »
Becerra’s confirmation, which all but one Republican opposed, came as expected after Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME), the sole Republican yes-vote, and Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV), a moderate Democrat, came out in support of the confirmation last week.

https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2021/03/18/senate-confirms-california-attorney-general-xavier-becerra-as-health-secretary-ultrathin-margin/


ccp

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here we go again
« Reply #1802 on: March 26, 2021, 02:24:59 PM »
feminist liberal USA today and the usual leftist doctors:

1).  Florida spring break BAD for corona

2)  Illegals coming in by tens or thousands - IGNORE

https://www.yahoo.com/news/potential-exponentially-spread-spring-break-100055598.html

ccp

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Fauci
« Reply #1803 on: March 29, 2021, 08:24:32 AM »
https://www.yahoo.com/huffpost/fauci-trump-shocked-him-093852117.html

funny
I don't think I heard Fauci speak out against all the BLM protests last summer

strangely silent about that , isn't he?

watching all the protesters was not a "punch to the gut"

and having CNN and other lib outlets and KHarris promoting them was not.a punch to the gut ?

DougMacG

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Re: Fauci
« Reply #1804 on: March 29, 2021, 09:21:12 AM »
Yes.  He's a smart guy with a strong background in the field but he's also a propagandist and a partisan loaded with bias.

He underestimated the virus.  He overestimated it.  He told us we didn't need masks, then that we need a double layer after vaccination, and still he makes the most of anyone in government and has people following his every word.  Yes he might cringe at some things Trump said, and we cringe on his words, causing schools to close for no good reason, blocking evictions, the enforcement of the most basic contract, shutting down jobs and industries, causing immeasurable damage.  Can't criticize CDC or China because we need their cooperation.  Now he needs Trump's cooperation to get people to take the vaccine but that's different.  Criticizing Trump elevates himself, and ego is science? 

Under Fauci, science has become a synonym for bullshit, and mixing truth in with it is the most dangerous type.
 
Forget masks for the virus at BLM protests, I'd like to know which 'scientist' of the Left spoke out against the air pollution from burning 1600 buildings in our town.  The silence is deafening.

ccp

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Medicare will be in bankrupt in 2026
« Reply #1805 on: April 22, 2021, 03:00:44 PM »
At its current pace, Medicare will go bankrupt in 2026 (the same as last year's projection) and the Social Security Trust Funds for old-aged benefits and disability benefits will become exhausted by 2035.

The Democrats are here so never fear and they are to the rescue:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/democrats-look-at-lowering-medicare-eligibility-age-in-healthcare-package-11617109207

OMFG
could the Dems drive this country into the ground any faster?
« Last Edit: April 22, 2021, 03:27:54 PM by ccp »

G M

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Re: Medicare will be in bankrupt in 2026
« Reply #1806 on: April 22, 2021, 03:02:31 PM »
They are going as fast as they can.


At its current pace, Medicare will go bankrupt in 2026 (the same as last year's projection) and the Social Security Trust Funds for old-aged benefits and disability benefits will become exhausted by 2035.

The Democrats are hear so never fear and are to the rescue:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/democrats-look-at-lowering-medicare-eligibility-age-in-healthcare-package-11617109207

OMFG
could the Dems drive this country into the ground any faster?


Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Bobby Jindal: The Texas Model for Conservative Health Care Reform
« Reply #1809 on: July 25, 2021, 02:46:49 AM »
Texas Provides a Model for Conservative Healthcare Reform
Republicans passed a package of market-friendly laws to expand access and increase competition.
By Bobby Jindal
July 23, 2021 6:02 pm ET


The Supreme Court ruled in 2012 that the federal government couldn’t force states to expand Medicaid as part of the Affordable Care Act. Ever since, Democrats and hospital lobbyists have looked for ways to push state legislators to let able-bodied adults earning up to 138% of the federal poverty level into Medicaid. In the last Covid relief bill, Democrats tried to give states more temporary money to expand Medicaid. Now they are considering legislation to allow Democratic cities in Republican states to expand Medicaid on their own. But Texas Republicans have modeled a better way to get Americans affordable healthcare.

Unfortunately, the Lone Star State is in the minority. Thirty-eight states and the District of Columbia have expanded or approved expansion of their programs. Democrats complain the other 12 states are turning down billions of “free” federal dollars while leaving millions uninsured. As a candidate, Joe Biden proposed creating a government-run plan for low-income people in states that don’t expand Medicaid.

Republicans resisting expansion argue that taxpayers end up paying for “free” federal dollars. State governments receive federal funding for a portion of each dollar they spend on Medicaid, but must provide matching funds from their own coffers. Expansion costs states billions in match requirements.

Conservative Texans who oppose Medicaid expansion point to the explosion in spending in states that have expanded their programs. More than half of Texas doctors said in 2016 they wouldn’t accept all new Medicaid patients due to low reimbursement and increased paperwork.


Medicaid isn’t well run and increasing dependence on government should be avoided. Oregon expanded Medicaid in 2008 using a lottery system, allowing for randomized selection, and a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health study showed no significant improvements in physical health outcomes.

Unfortunately, some GOP states that initially held their ground against Medicaid expansion have surrendered in recent years. As recently as mid-April, Texas seemed poised to relent. Nine Republican state representatives joined Democrats to co-sponsor H.B. 3871, giving Medicaid expansion enough votes to pass the 150-member House, but conservatives acted quickly to present a bipartisan package of bills called Healthy Families, Healthy Texas. In June, Gov. Greg Abbott signed into law this better, more targeted and market-friendly way to help Texans access the care they need.


The Healthy Families, Healthy Texas legislative package includes a law to expand access to telehealth services, on which regulations had been temporarily loosened during the pandemic. Telehealth especially benefits rural and medically underserved areas. The law also increases access to preventive and behavioral healthcare, reduces unnecessary emergency room use, and reduces “no-show” appointment rates.

A second new law makes it easier for doctors to work with patients across state lines and entered Texas into the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, streamlining the process for physicians to practice in multiple states. Physicians in other compact states can receive expedited licenses to practice in Texas. Increasing the supply of providers will help underserved areas.

A third law extends Medicaid coverage for pregnant women from 60 days after delivery to six months. A biennial state report indicated black women and Medicaid enrollees were more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications and that a majority of such deaths are preventable. A fourth law makes children continuously eligible for Medicaid by reducing the number of midyear reviews from four to one. Many eligible children have been losing coverage and access to primary care because of these reviews, leading to expensive—and preventable—emergency treatments.

A fifth law creates a prescription-drug program allowing a private pharmacy benefit manager to offer rebates to uninsured Texans. A sixth law builds on President Trump’s executive order requiring hospitals to provide price transparency. This is intended to encourage comparison shopping by patients and competition among providers.

A seventh law allows the Texas Mutual Insurance Co. to offer alternative healthcare-coverage products that are technically not insurance. The Texas Mutual was created by the Legislature in 1991 to provide affordable workmen’s compensation insurance, and the law will expand benefits to rural residents, small-business employees, and others. An eighth law allows the nonprofit Texas Farm Bureau, an advocacy group for the state’s agriculture interests, to offer health benefits to its members. Both the Texas Mutual and Farm Bureau plans would be exempt from many state insurance regulations. These plans won’t be the right choice for every Texan, but they will increase competition and offer lower cost options to many.


While liberals moaned about the “free” federal money Texas was missing out on, conservatives found ways to reduce the cost of prescription drugs and health plans, increase access to providers, and improve outcomes for women and children. These new laws may not all work as intended, and Democrats will keep pressing for Medicaid expansion, but the legislative fight in Texas shows Republicans can’t simply avoid the healthcare debate. They can win by offering their own ideas.

Mr. Jindal was governor of Louisiana, 2008-16, and a candidate for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.



ccp

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doctors as LEFTIST soldiers on climate change
« Reply #1812 on: October 11, 2021, 05:50:00 AM »
It is in American Journals too
my first thought was the same,
what does this have to do with health care
their are even lectures and classes on how doctors can be warriors for social change.

https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2021/10/11/delingpole-bmj-urges-doctors-to-cut-back-on-treatment-because-climate-change/