Author Topic: The Way forward for Republican party  (Read 32336 times)

DougMacG

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party
« Reply #150 on: May 14, 2021, 04:58:35 PM »
Watched the Baier-Cheney interview-- wow!  Baier sure brought the heat!

He brought heat in the form of substance and context.  Weird part is, I think Baier agrees with her about no election fraud.  Why is there no follow up by anyone on that substance?

The Navarro Report tells us what Trump's advisers were telling him at that time:
https://firehydrantoffreedom.com/index.php?topic=1709.msg131082#msg131082
Six dimensions of cheating in six states, 31 areas of cheating backed up with widespread evidence, hundreds of footnotes. 
How about someone on CNN (ha) asking her how she is sure all of that is wrong or that none of it would change the election result? 

ccp

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party
« Reply #151 on: May 14, 2021, 05:03:46 PM »
".Weird part is, I think Baier agrees with her about no election fraud "

yes your right Doug
at end of interview he blurted in one sentence  something like there was no election fraud

out of no where

not sure if he was obligated to for Fox News or he really believes it
but that did seem to counter the entire rest of his theme of the interview....

ccp

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Byron York - Conservative mood has shifted away from Trump
« Reply #152 on: May 16, 2021, 05:02:51 AM »
https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/byron-yorks-daily-memo-the-gop-is-bigger-than-trump

Excerpts ======>>>

"During Trump's presidency, majorities of Republicans and those who leaned Republican said they considered themselves more a supporter of Trump than of the GOP. For example, in September of 2020, 53 percent said they were a Trump supporter, versus 37 percent who said they were a GOP supporter. In June 2019, 52 percent said they were Trump supporters, versus 38 percent for the GOP.

Now that has changed. In a poll taken in late April, 50 percent said they were more a supporter of the GOP, while 44 percent said they were more a supporter of Trump. The balance between the former president and the party has changed.

Other polls show Trump's favorability rating with all registered voters below 40 percent, and favorability with Republicans around 80 percent. That is still high for Republicans, but less than it was when Trump was president. That's only natural."

PS : I don't recall Byron was ever a "never Trumper" and was supportive of at least most of his policies.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2021, 08:40:50 AM by ccp »

DougMacG

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Re: Byron York - Conservative mood has shifted away from Trump
« Reply #153 on: May 16, 2021, 06:52:07 AM »
https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/byron-yorks-daily-memo-the-gop-is-bigger-than-trump

Excerpts ======>>>

"During Trump's presidency, majorities of Republicans and those who leaned Republican said they considered themselves more a supporter of Trump than of the GOP. For example, in September of 2020, 53 percent said they were a Trump supporter, versus 37 percent who said they were a GOP supporter. In June 2019, 52 percent said they were Trump supporters, versus 38 percent for the GOP.

Now that has changed. In a poll taken in late April, 50 percent said they were more a supporter of the GOP, while 44 percent said they were more a supporter of Trump. The balance between the former president and the party has changed.

Other polls show Trump's favorability rating with all registered voters below 40 percent, and favorability with Republicans around 80 percent. That is still high for Republicans, but less than it was when Trump was president. That's only natural."

PS : I don't recall Byron was ever and "never Trumper" and was supportive of at least most of his policies.

Conservatives yearn for a leader with all of Trump's good qualities and none of his bad ones. It would be best for Trump too to back someone new if the right candidate is possible.  Better than re-fighting old fights, the referendum now is on the Biden Harris administration.

Note, the poll numbers are unfair when someone is prevented from fighting back in a free speech country.

ccp

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Trump giving up the "frontman" status
« Reply #154 on: May 16, 2021, 08:43:04 AM »
".It would be best for Trump too to back someone new if the right candidate is possible."

It would
be ,
if only he were capable enough to do this .

zero evidence of it for 74 yrs.


Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party
« Reply #156 on: May 31, 2021, 08:07:19 AM »
Is that the right URL for the Stefanik post?

ccp

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Elise Stefanik - Michelle Malkin - follow the money
« Reply #157 on: May 31, 2021, 08:16:06 AM »
no .  wrong post  !  :-o
my apologies

here is MM post about her here:

https://www.creators.com/read/michelle-malkin/05/21/beware-elise-stefaniks-moneyman

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party
« Reply #158 on: May 31, 2021, 10:46:55 AM »
Interesting.

DougMacG

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Re: Elise Stefanik - Michelle Malkin - follow the money
« Reply #159 on: June 01, 2021, 09:01:15 AM »
https://www.creators.com/read/michelle-malkin/05/21/beware-elise-stefaniks-moneyman

I like Michelle Malkin and the warning is valid. 

I would add that Elise Stefanik has her power now and does not need support of one money man anymore who bundled 300k.  She only needs to win her district and the most expensive House race ever was 50 million, almost 200 times that.  Her district is 56-42 Republican and she is now perhaps the second most powerful woman in Congress to Nancy Pelosi. She knows how to raise enough money to win her district, with or without one bundler.  He may need her; she doesn't need him.
https://www.nytimes.com/elections/results/new-york-house-district-21
https://time.com/4823581/georgia-election-ossoff-handel-race/

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party
« Reply #160 on: June 01, 2021, 09:53:15 AM »
Hope you are right!

ccp

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party
« Reply #161 on: June 01, 2021, 10:16:49 AM »
just reviewed her website
and some supposedly non biased reviews

that said I still cannot make sense of it all

She is for secure borders and "common sense " immigration " reform

whatever that means

did not say she would send back any illegals but site that says that again speaks the big lie about illegal immigration when it states there are 11 million here

we know it is double that or more even

leans conservative
gets good NRA rating

but just not sure

Hard to believe leftist money being spent to her is for just to later have some influence


DougMacG

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party, Stefanik
« Reply #162 on: June 01, 2021, 01:27:27 PM »
I would only add, there's a big distinction between moderate Republican with us 80% of the way, and a RINO who by definition is not there when you need them.  cf, McCain on Obamacare repeal, Romney, Cheney on impeachment.

From what I can see so far, she was there when we needed her. 

The party needs the center right to be a majority party and the party needs a woman in leadership.

Just the indication of support for a secure border is infinitely better than every Biden-supporting Democrat.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2021, 01:43:09 PM by DougMacG »

ccp

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party
« Reply #163 on: June 01, 2021, 03:23:05 PM »
"the party needs a woman in leadership."

well, we could have the first Olympic gold medalist , first
female president (if Joe doesn't croak first) and first trans president

and CRUSH the glass ceilings and be the envy of the World.  :wink:




G M

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Re: The Way forward for Republican party, Stefanik
« Reply #164 on: June 01, 2021, 05:51:31 PM »
A secure border in theory, never in practice.

McCain used the exact same words.

I would only add, there's a big distinction between moderate Republican with us 80% of the way, and a RINO who by definition is not there when you need them.  cf, McCain on Obamacare repeal, Romney, Cheney on impeachment.

From what I can see so far, she was there when we needed her. 

The party needs the center right to be a majority party and the party needs a woman in leadership.

Just the indication of support for a secure border is infinitely better than every Biden-supporting Democrat.

ccp

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Condoleeza Rice
« Reply #165 on: June 02, 2021, 07:40:04 AM »
gets it - sort of :

https://www.newsmax.com/politics/condoleeza-rice-trump-populist-americans/2021/06/02/id/1023586/

a bit late

it is not just globalization
   it is many things

Also,
I don't like the description of *POPULIST*
indeed i find this label annoying





Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Latinos going Republican
« Reply #167 on: June 08, 2021, 09:37:02 AM »
For decades some conservatives, yours truly among them, have argued that Latino Americans, with their ethic of faith and family and work, ought to be natural Republicans. On Saturday in a South Texas city on the Mexican border, Javier Villalobos gave America a glimpse of what this future might look like when he became the first Republican elected mayor of McAllen—the 85% Latino seat of Hidalgo County.

“Villalobos’ election should surprise absolutely no one who followed how counties in the Rio Grande Valley swung heavily toward Trump in the last election,” says Mike Gonzalez, a senior fellow at the Heritage Foundation and author of “The Plot to Change America: How Identity Politics Is Dividing the Land of the Free.”

As Mr. Gonzalez notes, the auguries were there for anyone who cared to look. In 2016 Hillary Clinton carried Hidalgo County by 41 points. But in 2020, Joe Biden won by only 17 points. Meanwhile Zapata County—what the Washington Post calls “the bluest of blue counties along the river”—flipped for Donald Trump in 2020, the first victory for a GOP presidential candidate there since Warren G. Harding a century ago.

These developments have Democrats sounding the alarm. A May postelection analysis by a trio of left-leaning organizations noted that while Latino turnout in 2020 grew “dramatically” over 2016, Democrats saw a “significant dip in support in places with high concentrations of Latino and Hispanic voters.” Nor were Republicans simply sitting on the sidelines all the while. When asked by Texas Monthly what was attractive to Latinos about the Republican Party, Chuck Rocha, an adviser to the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign, answered this way:

“At the Republican National Convention, the party had one Latino speaker after another telling their immigration story and how they lived the American dream. And if you just sit back and watch that or read the coverage, you might think, ‘Hey, these Republicans are all right. They like immigrants. They want to build entrepreneurship. They want us to all be rich like Donald Trump.’ ”

READ MORE MAIN STREET
Joe Biden’s Covid ‘Science’ May 31, 2021
God Save the Clarence Thomas Court May 24, 2021
Bernie’s SALT in Biden’s Wounds May 17, 2021
Robert Mueller’s Revenge May 10, 2021
Who’s Afraid of Tim Scott? May 3, 2021
A new National Republican Senatorial Committee survey of Latino likely voters in battleground states offers some striking insights here, especially on values and priorities. At a time when even some conservatives are attacking the GOP commitment to free markets, for example, the NRSC result is striking.

The survey asked Latinos to choose between two statements. The first was unadulterated Milton Friedman : “Some people say free-market capitalism is the best form of government because it gives people the freedom to work and achieve.”


The second was what we might call the Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez option: “Other people say that socialism is the best form of government because it is more fair and equitable to working class people.”

Almost two-thirds (63%) of respondents opted for the Friedman position, against only 17% for the AOC line. Hardly surprising, given that so many Latinos came to the U.S. in the first place to escape socialism. But capitalism is just the beginning of the surprises:

• 67% are “very concerned” their kids “won’t have the same opportunities me and my family came here to find.”

• 58% said too many people in America are happy not to work and “just live off government assistance.”

• 80% percent agree that “public schools are failing.”

• 67% agree that too many Americans “are losing our traditional values centered on faith, family and freedom.”

• 57% “oppose Democrat efforts to pack the Supreme Court with liberal judges.”

• 72% agree “we should do what is necessary to control our southern border.”

• 65% oppose the Democrats’ “bill that would make voter ID illegal.”

• 50% agree that “many of the policies that Democrats say help all minorities actually end up hurting Hispanic families.”

The NRSC’s conclusion? The political future isn’t California—it’s Florida. Florida’s electorate, the report notes, is substantially less white than it was in 2000, yet it is also more Republican than it was 20 years ago.

Still, if more Latinos are willing to pull the GOP lever these days, it probably owes as much to the Democratic Party’s lurch leftward than any brilliant Republican outreach. Last year’s riots certainly didn’t help among people who value law and order. In addition, Mr. Gonzalez argues that critical race theory, so popular with the political left, will end up having the opposite effect on minorities than progressives think.


“Critical race theory insists that Americans who are not WASPs must see themselves as aggrieved victims who want to transform America,” he says. “But people don’t fit into these neat categories cooked up in the faculty lounges. It’s turning off Americans of Latin background.”

The Democratic postmortem seems to confirm Mr. Gonzalez’s read. The GOP, it concedes, successfully cast Democrats in 2020 as the party of economic shutdowns, defunding the police, keeping schools closed, and socialism. “Republican attempts to brand Democrats as ‘radical’ worked,” it says.

The really bad news for Democrats? This was all back when Joe Biden was still selling himself to Americans as a moderate.

Write to mcgurn@wsj.com.

G M

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Re: WSJ: Latinos going Republican
« Reply #168 on: June 08, 2021, 09:53:45 AM »
 :roll:

Must be why California is so red!



For decades some conservatives, yours truly among them, have argued that Latino Americans, with their ethic of faith and family and work, ought to be natural Republicans. On Saturday in a South Texas city on the Mexican border, Javier Villalobos gave America a glimpse of what this future might look like when he became the first Republican elected mayor of McAllen—the 85% Latino seat of Hidalgo County.

“Villalobos’ election should surprise absolutely no one who followed how counties in the Rio Grande Valley swung heavily toward Trump in the last election,” says Mike Gonzalez, a senior fellow at the Heritage Foundation and author of “The Plot to Change America: How Identity Politics Is Dividing the Land of the Free.”

As Mr. Gonzalez notes, the auguries were there for anyone who cared to look. In 2016 Hillary Clinton carried Hidalgo County by 41 points. But in 2020, Joe Biden won by only 17 points. Meanwhile Zapata County—what the Washington Post calls “the bluest of blue counties along the river”—flipped for Donald Trump in 2020, the first victory for a GOP presidential candidate there since Warren G. Harding a century ago.

These developments have Democrats sounding the alarm. A May postelection analysis by a trio of left-leaning organizations noted that while Latino turnout in 2020 grew “dramatically” over 2016, Democrats saw a “significant dip in support in places with high concentrations of Latino and Hispanic voters.” Nor were Republicans simply sitting on the sidelines all the while. When asked by Texas Monthly what was attractive to Latinos about the Republican Party, Chuck Rocha, an adviser to the Bernie Sanders presidential campaign, answered this way:

“At the Republican National Convention, the party had one Latino speaker after another telling their immigration story and how they lived the American dream. And if you just sit back and watch that or read the coverage, you might think, ‘Hey, these Republicans are all right. They like immigrants. They want to build entrepreneurship. They want us to all be rich like Donald Trump.’ ”

READ MORE MAIN STREET
Joe Biden’s Covid ‘Science’ May 31, 2021
God Save the Clarence Thomas Court May 24, 2021
Bernie’s SALT in Biden’s Wounds May 17, 2021
Robert Mueller’s Revenge May 10, 2021
Who’s Afraid of Tim Scott? May 3, 2021
A new National Republican Senatorial Committee survey of Latino likely voters in battleground states offers some striking insights here, especially on values and priorities. At a time when even some conservatives are attacking the GOP commitment to free markets, for example, the NRSC result is striking.

The survey asked Latinos to choose between two statements. The first was unadulterated Milton Friedman : “Some people say free-market capitalism is the best form of government because it gives people the freedom to work and achieve.”


The second was what we might call the Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez option: “Other people say that socialism is the best form of government because it is more fair and equitable to working class people.”

Almost two-thirds (63%) of respondents opted for the Friedman position, against only 17% for the AOC line. Hardly surprising, given that so many Latinos came to the U.S. in the first place to escape socialism. But capitalism is just the beginning of the surprises:

• 67% are “very concerned” their kids “won’t have the same opportunities me and my family came here to find.”

• 58% said too many people in America are happy not to work and “just live off government assistance.”

• 80% percent agree that “public schools are failing.”

• 67% agree that too many Americans “are losing our traditional values centered on faith, family and freedom.”

• 57% “oppose Democrat efforts to pack the Supreme Court with liberal judges.”

• 72% agree “we should do what is necessary to control our southern border.”

• 65% oppose the Democrats’ “bill that would make voter ID illegal.”

• 50% agree that “many of the policies that Democrats say help all minorities actually end up hurting Hispanic families.”

The NRSC’s conclusion? The political future isn’t California—it’s Florida. Florida’s electorate, the report notes, is substantially less white than it was in 2000, yet it is also more Republican than it was 20 years ago.

Still, if more Latinos are willing to pull the GOP lever these days, it probably owes as much to the Democratic Party’s lurch leftward than any brilliant Republican outreach. Last year’s riots certainly didn’t help among people who value law and order. In addition, Mr. Gonzalez argues that critical race theory, so popular with the political left, will end up having the opposite effect on minorities than progressives think.


“Critical race theory insists that Americans who are not WASPs must see themselves as aggrieved victims who want to transform America,” he says. “But people don’t fit into these neat categories cooked up in the faculty lounges. It’s turning off Americans of Latin background.”

The Democratic postmortem seems to confirm Mr. Gonzalez’s read. The GOP, it concedes, successfully cast Democrats in 2020 as the party of economic shutdowns, defunding the police, keeping schools closed, and socialism. “Republican attempts to brand Democrats as ‘radical’ worked,” it says.

The really bad news for Democrats? This was all back when Joe Biden was still selling himself to Americans as a moderate.

Write to mcgurn@wsj.com.