Author Topic: China vs. the World; Chinese political intimidation & penetration  (Read 8891 times)

Crafty_Dog

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Re: China vs. the World; Chinese political intimidation & penetration
« Reply #150 on: April 13, 2021, 11:29:10 AM »
Hard to see how we can avoid for #2 status.

DougMacG

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Re: China vs. the World; Chinese political intimidation & penetration
« Reply #151 on: April 13, 2021, 11:56:17 AM »
Hard to see how we can avoid for #2 status.

PRC population = 1.4 billion
US population   =    330 million

If they have grown past third world country status, hard to see how they don't go past us in terms of GDP and ability to spend on military.  But if it is China vs. the world, the US side includes some parts of the rest of the world, hopefully much more than China.  If not (all of) Europe, there is India, Japan, Australia, maybe UK, Canada and others.

Our main problem/challenge is to get our own house in order.  The market system will do fine overall against central planning, if only we had retained the free market system.  In some ways like business taxes, their market is freer.  For single minded efforts like building the pyramids, the master slave economy has certain advantages.

I believe that right before Covid we had them close to where we wanted them in negotiations.  Since then, we lost our grip, we lost Trump, they gained Biden, we lost our growth engine, we lost our leverage, we lost Europe, and on it goes.

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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GPF: Italy tries to get off its ass
« Reply #153 on: April 22, 2021, 07:38:24 PM »
European resistance to China. Soon to be flush with European recovery funds, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi is reportedly moving to bolster measures aimed at preventing foreign (i.e., Chinese and Russian) takeovers of distressed Italian companies – as happened across the Continent during the European sovereign debt crisis. Meanwhile, Montenegro is reportedly seeking deeper integration with the European Union, partly as a way to gain leverage in its efforts to renegotiate a loan agreement with China.

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: China vs. the World; Chinese political intimidation & penetration
« Reply #156 on: May 07, 2021, 09:34:09 AM »
Europe Starts to Come Around on China
Putting business first and alienating the U.S. has backfired.
By The Editorial Board
May 6, 2021 6:47 pm ET


President Biden wants to work with traditional American allies to resist China’s increasing belligerence. While the European Union has tried to steer its own course, Beijing is doing its part to revive the trans-Atlantic alliance.

“We now in a sense have suspended . . . political outreach activities from the European Commission side,” EU Trade Commissioner Valdis Dombrovskis told AFP on Tuesday. “The environment is not conducive for ratification of the agreement.” Mr. Dombrovskis is referring to the Comprehensive Agreement on Investment, a deal meant to provide Europe and China greater access to each other’s markets.

Weeks before becoming U.S. national security adviser, Jake Sullivan requested “early consultations” with Brussels about the pact. Europe responded by announcing it had reached an agreement-in-principle with China. But the European Parliament and 27 national leaders still have to approve the deal.

That process became more complicated in March, when the European Union announced sanctions targeting four Chinese officials involved with human-rights abuses in the Xinjiang region. Beijing responded by imposing sanctions on several members of the European Parliament and other Europeans critical of the Chinese Communist Party.


It’s hard to ratify a deal with a country that has sanctioned officials who will vote on ratification, but German Chancellor Angela Merkel is still trying. She spoke with Chinese President Xi Jinping and French President Emmanuel Macron last month, and the German readout of the call didn’t mention human rights. The French later said it came up, but Ms. Merkel is trying to play down the issue as she seeks to solidify the deal before elections this year.


Europe understandably wants to resolve its trade issues with China—so does the U.S. Germany exported nearly €100 billion in goods to China last year, and the trade pact theoretically creates opportunities in autos, telecom and healthcare, among other industries.

But Ms. Merkel’s “change through trade” philosophy—something we once hoped for China—is out of date. Economic relations need to consider China’s often predatory mercantilism, IP theft and cyber spying. Beijing saw Europe’s snub of the new U.S. Administration last year as a major geopolitical victory.

An EU official clarified Tuesday that the talks were “not quite suspended” and “ratification will depend on how the situation evolves.” Ms. Merkel and her allies will continue to fight for the deal. But skepticism is growing in the European Parliament, the German political class and the European public. Rather than struggle to pass a flawed deal, the Continent would be better off regrouping and approaching China in a united trade front with the U.S. and other like-minded nations.

Winston Churchill may or not have said the famous line, “The Americans can always be trusted to do the right thing, once all other possibilities have been exhausted.” But we’d understand if Mr. Biden feels the same way about his friends in Europe.

Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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Re: China vs. the World; Chinese political intimidation & penetration
« Reply #159 on: May 09, 2021, 05:16:14 PM »
https://www.zerohedge.com/covid-19/chinese-military-discussed-weaponizing-covid-2015-cause-enemys-medical-system-collapse?utm_campaign=&utm_content=Zerohedge%3A+The+Durden+Dispatch&utm_medium=email&utm_source=zh_newsletter

Scary stuff.  Quite incriminating.  Whether it was intentional or they were collecting and investigating these viruses for offensive and defensive purposes and it escaped accidentally, the result is the same and the crime is the same.  Think Derrick Chauvin.  The recklessness of what China did in the lab and planning for this possibility was criminal, the result was pandemic worldwide.  The verdict must be mass murder, multi-million counts.  I would add hate crime to the charge and double the penalty.  BTW, what is the penalty?  With Biden, obviously nothing.  The rest of the country and the world should insist this be taken to The Hague and tried as a war crime, with real charges, discovery, witnesses and Journalists covering it.  Hold the PLA accountable, all the way up to Xi.

Liberals in US and Europe want world government.  Let's try it here with basic world law enforcement.  Try the case and make the Chinese regime give up power if guilty.  Is that too much to ask? 

Crafty_Dog

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China vs. Australia
« Reply #160 on: May 11, 2021, 09:32:08 AM »
Risky tactic. China’s pressure campaign against Australia is increasingly moving into energy commodities, with at least two Chinese importers of liquefied natural gas reportedly ordered to buy from elsewhere. This is partially the result of trade diversion that was bound to happen with the signing of the “phase one” U.S.-China trade deal in early 2020; to even come close to meeting its ambitious import targets, China needs to buy a whole lot of energy from the United States. But targeting Australian gas, coal and other energy commodities is a little risky, given that Chinese demand is likely to remain high for a long time.

DougMacG

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Re: China vs. Australia
« Reply #161 on: May 11, 2021, 10:06:10 AM »
Risky tactic. China’s pressure campaign against Australia is increasingly moving into energy commodities, with at least two Chinese importers of liquefied natural gas reportedly ordered to buy from elsewhere. This is partially the result of trade diversion that was bound to happen with the signing of the “phase one” U.S.-China trade deal in early 2020; to even come close to meeting its ambitious import targets, China needs to buy a whole lot of energy from the United States. But targeting Australian gas, coal and other energy commodities is a little risky, given that Chinese demand is likely to remain high for a long time.

Yes, risky. 

Definition of a trade war:  You shoot a hole in the bottom of your boat.  I retaliate by shooting a bigger hole in the bottom of mine. 

Trade is mutually beneficial by definition.  Energy goes beyond that; it is essential for survival and prosperity.  Seems dumb to screw around with that.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2021, 10:27:49 AM by DougMacG »

Crafty_Dog

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GPF: China-Australia, more
« Reply #162 on: May 18, 2021, 01:05:30 PM »
Chinese squeeze play on Australia still on. China’s National Development and Reform Commission on Monday said it was encouraging importers to look elsewhere for iron ore, Australia’s most lucrative commodity export. Meanwhile, a new study suggests that Sino-Australian tensions led to a 29 percent drop in investment in Australian real estate. Australian exports to China and Chinese investment in Australia were the two foremost reasons Australia was able to avoid a recession for more than two decades pre-pandemic.

Not-so-secret talks. China has reportedly been holding behind-the-scenes talks with a handful of countries on potentially joining the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, the strategically important 11-nation (12 before the U.S. withdrew in 2017) trade pact. Officials from Australia, Malaysia and New Zealand have apparently taken part, and likely some other member states as well. If such talks gain traction, it would say quite a bit about the direction regional states see the Sino-U.S. competition going over the long term. Japan and several other members are anxious to get Washington back in the pact ASAP, so expect to see more of these sorts of reports leak as a tactic aimed at generating pro-CPTPP momentum in the United States.

Crafty_Dog

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GPF: China penetration via Huawei
« Reply #163 on: May 24, 2021, 07:39:28 AM »
May 21, 2021
View On Website
Open as PDF

    
Even Under Siege, Huawei Increases Its Reach
Its global footprint is still huge and steadily expanding.
By: Geopolitical Futures
Huawei's Developing Global Reach

(click to enlarge)

U.S. measures targeting Chinese telecoms giant Huawei have hit the company hard. U.S. restrictions on semiconductor sales have pushed it into crisis mode at home. U.S. software restrictions have hammered Huawei's smartphone market share. And U.S. efforts to deny it access to Western markets have been fruitful, with dozens of countries in Europe and elsewhere adopting at least partial bans on including Huawei gear in their 5G network rollouts. But Huawei's global footprint is still huge and steadily expanding. After all, the full suite of products and services it offers goes far beyond smartphones and 5G – and Huawei wields tremendous advantages thanks, in part, to government financial and diplomatic backing.
Naturally, the developing world is where these advantages deliver the most diplomatic bang for their buck. This is evident in Huawei's sales of cloud infrastructure and e-government services. More than half of the 70 deals in 41 countries Huawei is confirmed to have inked in these sectors are in emerging markets. Among these, the largest share – around 36 percent – have come in sub-Saharan Africa. A full 72 percent of deals have been inked with countries characterized as middle income. And given Huawei's talent for wooing authoritarian governments in places notorious for a lack of transparency, the true number is likely higher.

G M

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Re: GPF: China penetration via Huawei
« Reply #164 on: May 24, 2021, 08:50:17 AM »
https://freebeacon.com/biden-administration/biden-intel-nominee-grilled-for-huawei-work/

May 21, 2021
View On Website
Open as PDF

    
Even Under Siege, Huawei Increases Its Reach
Its global footprint is still huge and steadily expanding.
By: Geopolitical Futures
Huawei's Developing Global Reach

(click to enlarge)

U.S. measures targeting Chinese telecoms giant Huawei have hit the company hard. U.S. restrictions on semiconductor sales have pushed it into crisis mode at home. U.S. software restrictions have hammered Huawei's smartphone market share. And U.S. efforts to deny it access to Western markets have been fruitful, with dozens of countries in Europe and elsewhere adopting at least partial bans on including Huawei gear in their 5G network rollouts. But Huawei's global footprint is still huge and steadily expanding. After all, the full suite of products and services it offers goes far beyond smartphones and 5G – and Huawei wields tremendous advantages thanks, in part, to government financial and diplomatic backing.
Naturally, the developing world is where these advantages deliver the most diplomatic bang for their buck. This is evident in Huawei's sales of cloud infrastructure and e-government services. More than half of the 70 deals in 41 countries Huawei is confirmed to have inked in these sectors are in emerging markets. Among these, the largest share – around 36 percent – have come in sub-Saharan Africa. A full 72 percent of deals have been inked with countries characterized as middle income. And given Huawei's talent for wooing authoritarian governments in places notorious for a lack of transparency, the true number is likely higher.

Crafty_Dog

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GPF: China vs. Lithuania and other "small countries"
« Reply #165 on: May 25, 2021, 08:20:05 PM »
China versus Lithuania. Over the weekend, Lithuania withdrew from a cooperation forum involving China and 17 Central and Eastern European states and called on other EU members to follow suit. On Monday, the Chinese Foreign Ministry tried to shrug it off, calling Lithuania's move an "isolated incident" that wouldn't derail Chinese cooperation with the grouping. But an article in the hawkish Global Times ripped into Lithuania, saying the country is "not qualified to attack China and this is not the way a small country should act" and that "when such a small country is aggressive ... it will invite trouble." This sort of rhetoric will resonate far beyond the Baltics. A similar statement from China's foreign minister in 2010 directed at "small countries" in Southeast Asia, for example, was considered an inflection point in regional perceptions of Chinese coercion.

DougMacG

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https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/jim-treacher/2021/05/25/chinese-communist-party-shelled-out-millions-for-propaganda-in-american-newspapers-n1449515

Chinese Communist Party Shelled Out Millions for Propaganda in American Newspapers

https://freebeacon.com/media/chinese-propaganda-outlet-paid-millions-to-american-%20newspapers-and-magazines/
-------------------------------------------------------------

Shouldn't cost that much, America's newspapers are already a propaganda arm for the Chinese Communist Party.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: China vs. the World; Chinese political intimidation & penetration
« Reply #167 on: May 26, 2021, 02:22:29 PM »
The FreeBeacon page is showing "not found".

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Must read/or view Gordon Chang on multiple Chinese topics
« Reply #169 on: June 02, 2021, 08:58:24 AM »
most stunning is his prediction that China's population could shrink by 1 billion people by end of century:
https://www.newsmax.com/newsmax-tv/gordon-chang-covid-19-intelligence-research/2021/06/01/id/1023488/

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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GPF: China vs. Hungary
« Reply #171 on: June 07, 2021, 11:02:21 AM »
Backlash in Budapest. Protests broke out in Budapest over the weekend against the Hungarian government’s plans to construct a Chinese university campus in the city. The project would require a $1.8 billion investment from Hungary.

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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GPF: China eyes stake in Hamburg, Germany port
« Reply #173 on: June 08, 2021, 11:30:14 AM »
China eyes stake at Hamburg port. Chinese state-owned shipping company COSCO is in advanced negotiations with the Port of Hamburg’s HHLA over acquiring a 30-40 percent stake in the Tollerort container terminal. The agreement would enable COSCO ships to receive priority handling there in the future. Talks have been conducted in coordination with the German government, which has not yet raised any serious objections.

Crafty_Dog

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China vs. NATO
« Reply #174 on: June 14, 2021, 09:51:18 PM »
   
Brief: NATO’s Concerns Over China
A communique specifically cites the problems over Beijing’s growing nuclear arsenal.
By: Geopolitical Futures
Background: NATO has had a bit of an identity crisis ever since the Soviet Union collapsed. Not only is there no longer a primary enemy to ally against, but each NATO member increasingly has national interests that may run counter to the others', including those over China. The United States in particular is trying to expand NATO cooperation to counter Chinese influence in Europe, which often takes the form of economic, not military, action.

What Happened: NATO issued its official communique after its June 14 summit. In it, the alliance expressed concern over China’s rapidly expanding nuclear arsenal (both in terms of the number of warheads and number of delivery systems to establish a nuclear triad). The communique also says China and Russia are cooperating militarily, including in Russian-led exercises in the Euro-Atlantic area.

Bottom Line: Russia and China already established bilateral military cooperation and drills through the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. These joint exercises and military maneuvers, however, take place primarily in Central and Eastern Asian countries, not the Euro-Atlantic area. It’s unclear what activities NATO is referring to, but the potential introduction of such a dynamic could greatly change the strategic calculus for European defense.