Author Topic: Gov. Ron DeSantis  (Read 4781 times)

Crafty_Dog

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Gov. Ron DeSantis activates National Guard at State Prisons
« Reply #100 on: September 12, 2022, 04:35:43 PM »
ET
Gov. DeSantis Activates National Guard at Florida State Prisons
By Jack Phillips September 12, 2022



Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has activated the state National Guard in a bid to aid corrections officers amid staffing issues at prisons.

The Department of Corrections “is authorized to employ over 20,000 correctional and correctional probation officers, almost a quarter of all state employees,” the governor’s order states, noting that there’s currently a “severe shortage” of officers that “threatens the safety” of inmates, officers, and the public.

The state’s corrections agency said that National Guard members will be deployed as a supplemental measure to security posts at some institutions. They will be supervised by respective prison wardens or similar staff, the agency said.

“We think, as we continue to hire and reduce the stress on the compounds, the existing officers are going to want to stay because they’re not going to work that amount of overtime they’re currently working,” Department of Corrections Chief Financial Officer Mark Tallent told WPTV. “They’re going to have a better family life, be able to get out of the institution more. We definitely think we’re trending in the right direction.”

The Guard members won’t be expected to directly supervise inmates, according to DeSantis’s order.

“Members of the Guard have the training and capability to assist Florida’s correctional officers with certain duties, such as manning guard towers, perimeter patrols, and control stations, which will allow the correctional officers to concentrate on directly supervising and caring for inmates,” the Republican governor’s order reads.

Financial Incentives
Earlier this year, DeSantis approved a pay increase to recruit and retrain current corrections officers.

Florida National Guard Lt. Col. Peter Jennison told the Tallahassee Democrat newspaper that he expects all the Guard members who are assigned would volunteer for the prison assignments.

Tallent said that as many as 300 National Guard members would be deployed.

“We think we’ll be able to right-size ourselves by the end of the fiscal year,” he said.

Democrats in the state Legislature expressed concerns about DeSantis’s order. A leader within the Florida Democratic caucus said the Legislature has ignored funding of the Department of Corrections for years.

“Florida has ignored this agency and ignored this problem, and underfunded this agency for years,” Democrat House Minority Leader-designate Rep. Fentrice Driskell said on Sept. 9. “Now, it looks like the governor wants to activate the Florida National Guard, which will take people away from their homes, their families, and their jobs.”

Nonetheless, members of the Joint Legislative Budget Commission voted on Sept. 9 to approve sending Florida National Guard members to the prisons. The GOP and most Democrats supported the plan, with Sen. Audrey Gibson and Rep. Ramon Alexander opposing it.

Shortly after the vote, DeSantis activated the Guard via executive order, local media reported.

G M

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis activates National Guard at State Prisons
« Reply #101 on: September 12, 2022, 09:28:49 PM »
Funny how after villifying law enforcement, now we can't fill positions.



ET
Gov. DeSantis Activates National Guard at Florida State Prisons
By Jack Phillips September 12, 2022



Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has activated the state National Guard in a bid to aid corrections officers amid staffing issues at prisons.

The Department of Corrections “is authorized to employ over 20,000 correctional and correctional probation officers, almost a quarter of all state employees,” the governor’s order states, noting that there’s currently a “severe shortage” of officers that “threatens the safety” of inmates, officers, and the public.

The state’s corrections agency said that National Guard members will be deployed as a supplemental measure to security posts at some institutions. They will be supervised by respective prison wardens or similar staff, the agency said.

“We think, as we continue to hire and reduce the stress on the compounds, the existing officers are going to want to stay because they’re not going to work that amount of overtime they’re currently working,” Department of Corrections Chief Financial Officer Mark Tallent told WPTV. “They’re going to have a better family life, be able to get out of the institution more. We definitely think we’re trending in the right direction.”

The Guard members won’t be expected to directly supervise inmates, according to DeSantis’s order.

“Members of the Guard have the training and capability to assist Florida’s correctional officers with certain duties, such as manning guard towers, perimeter patrols, and control stations, which will allow the correctional officers to concentrate on directly supervising and caring for inmates,” the Republican governor’s order reads.

Financial Incentives
Earlier this year, DeSantis approved a pay increase to recruit and retrain current corrections officers.

Florida National Guard Lt. Col. Peter Jennison told the Tallahassee Democrat newspaper that he expects all the Guard members who are assigned would volunteer for the prison assignments.

Tallent said that as many as 300 National Guard members would be deployed.

“We think we’ll be able to right-size ourselves by the end of the fiscal year,” he said.

Democrats in the state Legislature expressed concerns about DeSantis’s order. A leader within the Florida Democratic caucus said the Legislature has ignored funding of the Department of Corrections for years.

“Florida has ignored this agency and ignored this problem, and underfunded this agency for years,” Democrat House Minority Leader-designate Rep. Fentrice Driskell said on Sept. 9. “Now, it looks like the governor wants to activate the Florida National Guard, which will take people away from their homes, their families, and their jobs.”

Nonetheless, members of the Joint Legislative Budget Commission voted on Sept. 9 to approve sending Florida National Guard members to the prisons. The GOP and most Democrats supported the plan, with Sen. Audrey Gibson and Rep. Ramon Alexander opposing it.

Shortly after the vote, DeSantis activated the Guard via executive order, local media reported.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #102 on: September 13, 2022, 03:05:10 PM »
Once again, DeSantis shows his real world executive chops.

Crisp call him "DeSatan" btw , , ,


ccp

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illegals to MV MASS
« Reply #104 on: September 15, 2022, 02:14:02 PM »

G M

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Gov. Ron DeSantis FTW!
« Reply #105 on: September 17, 2022, 08:07:03 AM »

ccp

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national guard called by Mass Gov. for the migrant "emergency"
« Reply #106 on: September 17, 2022, 08:18:36 AM »
https://nypost.com/2022/09/16/marthas-vineyard-migrants-sent-to-cape-cod-mass-calls-national-guard/

you know Obama et al got on the phone to the gov

use of NG

to make a point:

"we have the military apparatus on our side "

any thoughts?

G M

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Re: national guard called by Mass Gov. for the migrant "emergency"
« Reply #107 on: September 17, 2022, 08:24:24 AM »
https://nypost.com/2022/09/16/marthas-vineyard-migrants-sent-to-cape-cod-mass-calls-national-guard/

you know Obama et al got on the phone to the gov

use of NG

to make a point:

"we have the military apparatus on our side "

any thoughts?

The fake and gay military will put you into camps or shoot you if ordered to do so.

Plan accordingly.


ccp

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game on
« Reply #109 on: September 23, 2022, 06:03:38 AM »
Kushner bashes DeSantis

and promotes Donald:

https://www.breitbart.com/clips/2022/09/22/kushner-on-desantis-migrants-flights-using-human-beings-as-political-pawns-very-troubling/

[while promoting his self promoting book]

he sounds more like an elite NY liberal here like his father

G M

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Re: game on
« Reply #110 on: September 23, 2022, 07:49:08 AM »
Exactly.


Kushner bashes DeSantis

and promotes Donald:

https://www.breitbart.com/clips/2022/09/22/kushner-on-desantis-migrants-flights-using-human-beings-as-political-pawns-very-troubling/

[while promoting his self promoting book]

he sounds more like an elite NY liberal here like his father

Crafty_Dog

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Gov. Ron DeSantis on the real divide
« Reply #111 on: September 23, 2022, 07:31:47 PM »
Migrant Flights Obscure the Real DeSantis Divide
The governor has noted a historic shift that no political outrage will change.
Daniel Henninger hedcutBy Daniel HenningerFollow
Sept. 21, 2022 6:14 pm ET


Wonder Land: Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has noted a historic shift that no political outrage will change. Images: AP/Zuma Press/AFP via Getty Images Composite: Mark Kelly

What phenomenon of our time produces more falsity than any other? The list of contenders is long but we have a winner—political outrage. These days it surges by the minute. The past week produced faux political outrage for the record books when Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis flew 50 migrants to Martha’s Vineyard.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom called it “almost monstrous,” adding, “I say that quite thoughtfully.” White House spokesperson Karine Jean-Pierre likened the governor to Guatemalan smugglers. Unsurpassable is a long piece by six CNN staffers that says flying 50 migrants to the Vineyard “has revived memories of strikingly similar tactics employed by southern segregationists 60 years ago.”

You probably didn’t notice that Gov. DeSantis did something else last week that has a lot more relevance to this country’s future. We’ll get to that but not before relating Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s view that the migrants being bused to her city from Texas are a “manufactured crisis” even as the federal government said that since January more than two million migrants have come illegally across the southern border in fiscal 2022.

Shortly before the Vineyard controversy, Gov. DeSantis delivered an interesting speech near Miami to a convocation of conservatives. Some called it a test drive of ideas for a presidential run, and it probably was. One DeSantis idea, though, should have caught the eye of anyone focused on the flow of U.S. history.

The governor described something he called a “Great American Exodus.” In short, he means the recent movement of U.S. population out of California and the North—primarily New York, New Jersey and Illinois—into states in the South and West. He says this shift has a “political character,” which he was happy to describe. Since the pandemic began, he said, “more adjusted gross income [moved] into the state of Florida than has ever moved into any one state over a similar time period in American history.”

For years, demographers have studied this population migration from North to South, a shift with significant implications for the economic health and political power of both regions.

In May, the Census Bureau released data noting a large departure from Northern cities between July 2020 and July 2021. The populations of San Francisco fell 6.3%, New York City 3.5%, Boston and Washington both 2.9%. The New York Post reported this week that, according to Florida driver’s-license registrations, 41,885 New Yorkers moved there this year.

More broadly, the Census Bureau reported in 2019 that “Florida had the most domestic inmovers, with 566,476 people moving from another state within the past year.” Meanwhile, “California had the most domestic outmovers, with 661,026 people moving to another state” in the previous year. Some movement has occurred inside state borders, for instance out of New York City to the suburbs or from Los Angeles and San Francisco to inland California counties. The “political character” point is that many cities administered for decades by liberal, and more recently progressive, Democrats are hemorrhaging population.

It’s not just the 1% fleeing high-tax states for lower taxes. Receiving little attention is the fact that black Americans are also moving south, reversing the Great Migration into the North during the 20th century.

Brookings Institution demographer William Frey details this in a September report. Describing what he calls “a virtual evacuation from many northern areas,” Mr. Frey writes the “movement is largely driven by younger, college-educated Black Americans, from both northern and western places of origin. They have contributed to the growth of the ‘New South,’ especially in Texas, Georgia, and North Carolina, as well as metropolitan regions such as Atlanta, Dallas, and Houston.”

Mr. Frey notes that these migrations to the South have increased black Americans’ political power there, much of it flowing to the Democratic Party. But an undeniable reality, emphasized by Gov. DeSantis, is that this movement is overwhelmingly driven by the prospect of greater economic opportunity.


Arguably the biggest boomtown in America is Miami, led by Republican Mayor Francis X. Suarez and described recently in this newspaper. A primary reason, according to the article, is Miami’s “friendlier business climate.”

You’ve probably noticed that the mayors of New York, Chicago and Washington say they lack resources to provide for several thousand migrants. I believe it. Decades of unrestrained public spending have turned their budgets into a ball and chain. Many once-great American population centers are tapped out.

Here’s the kicker, literally: Last week, 13 treasurers from Democratic states including California and Illinois plus New York City’s comptroller issued a letter attacking West Virginia, Idaho, Oklahoma, Texas and Florida for resisting public-pension investments tied to environmental, social and governance sustainability goals. The letter accuses these states of acting on behalf of “corporate interests.” What a spectacle—Democratic state treasurers denouncing corporations that are the bedrock of their tax base. Or were.

His critics call Gov. DeSantis “divisive.” The real DeSantis Divide, however, is about public-policy choices that are causing historic losses in the North and gains in the South and West. No amount of political outrage will change that.

ccp

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Trump getting jealous
« Reply #112 on: September 24, 2022, 10:37:46 AM »
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/trump-and-desantis-once-allies-now-in-simmering-rivalry-with-2024-nearing/ar-AA12bTSD

I still say DeSantis would be hurting himself if he were to run on. ticket with Trump

if wasn't 100% on his knees for 4 yrs

trump will turn on him like he always does.

DeSantis has a better future then that

That is why Kushneck had to criticize DeSantis sending illegals to MV . Trump team could not give him credit for it since it was so successful - and trump could not take the glory

IMHO

DeSantis for Prez!! '24



Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #113 on: September 24, 2022, 11:26:33 AM »
"That is why Kushneck had to criticize DeSantis sending illegals to MV . Trump team could not give him credit for it since it was so successful - and trump could not take the glory"

I was on the road and did not see this.  Is there a convenient citation?

ccp

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #114 on: September 24, 2022, 11:38:34 AM »
" I was on the road and did not see this.  Is there a convenient citation?"

please
see ccp post from

september 23rd

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #115 on: September 24, 2022, 11:45:21 AM »
Thank you.

Kushner is such a cunt, though I must say he is coming across very well now in his TV appearances pushing his book etc.  Very much looks like he is up to something.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2022, 06:37:06 PM by Crafty_Dog »

ccp

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lawfare on DeSantis
« Reply #116 on: October 03, 2022, 03:53:11 PM »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/story-behind-desantis-migrant-flights-121036625.html

he transported migrants to the Siberia that is MV
without legal permission

what?

who was he supposed to get "legal permission from ?"

Mayorkas?

DNC ?

DC Shysters

ccp

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word from Florida
« Reply #117 on: October 06, 2022, 02:36:11 PM »
is DeSantis is doing a great job

with Ian.  :-D

suck off MSM!   :wink:

and without the nasty tweets !

ccp

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Ron backs anti trump candidate in Colorado
« Reply #118 on: October 24, 2022, 11:00:13 AM »
https://www.yahoo.com/news/garland-hold-news-conference-significant-164441880.html

why because he could win

Trump response "big mistake!"   :roll:


Crafty_Dog

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DeSantis in NY for Zeldin
« Reply #119 on: October 30, 2022, 06:19:20 PM »
Ron DeSantis Stumps for Lee Zeldin

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis campaigns alongside New York Republican gubernatorial hopeful Rep. Lee Zeldin (R., N.Y.) at a Get Out The Vote Rally in Hauppauge, N.Y., October 29, 2022. (David Dee Delgado/Getty Images)
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By DAN MCLAUGHLIN
October 30, 2022 12:12 AM
Lee Zeldin’s campaign for governor of New York now has a classic puncher’s chance: His is still very much an underdog race, with Kathy Hochul still holding a seven-point lead in the poll average, but with nine days to go, the national tailwind at his back, and fresh from capitalizing on gaffes by Hochul at their lone debate Tuesday night, Zeldin is still in the game. Republicans are not sending their frontline talent to help dead-in-the-water candidates like Darren Bailey in Illinois, Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts, or Dan Cox in Maryland. In fact, you know who is campaigning in Maryland the night before the election? Joe Biden.

But for Zeldin, they are rolling out the big guns. In heavily upscale suburban Westchester County north of the Bronx, maybe the single most critical swing county in this race, Virginia governor Glenn Youngkin is campaigning for Zeldin on Monday. That’s a change from 2014, when Rob Astorino ran a respectable but obviously doomed race against Andrew Cuomo, and couldn’t get Chris Christie to campaign for him. Meanwhile, Hochul is calling in Hillary Clinton — maybe the most tone-deaf choice possible even in New York — and First Lady Jill Biden is campaigning for New York congressional candidates upstate.

Then, there’s one of the few Republican stars bigger than Youngkin: Ron DeSantis. DeSantis has been intensely focused on his own re-election campaign — he was noticeably absent from Republican primary fights except in his own state — and he was at the Florida-Georgia game earlier today, but one of the luxuries of a double-digit poll lead is that you can afford to spend a little time helping to build your party’s team. DeSantis planned to come to a Zeldin fundraiser in late August, but had to cancel to attend a funeral for a former member of his protective detail killed in the line of duty. This time, he made it. I drove out to see both Zeldin and DeSantis live on the stump.

The event was behind Zeldin’s campaign headquarters in Hauppauge, which is geographically in the center of Long Island. If Youngkin is the right man for Westchester County crowds, DeSantis is the right man for the Island, which is not the fully-Trumpy areas of economically-desolate upstate, but is stocked with cops, firemen, nurses, and other blue-collar types. It was a cold night, dropping into the mid-40s by the time of the rally, and it was only publicly announced yesterday, but there were thousands in attendance — I’m bad at counting crowds, but an hour before the event, there was a nearly half-mile line to get in. There were people packed behind the press riser where I was stationed with some two dozen members of the media.

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A visit from DeSantis was treated as a big deal by the New York Republicans. We were treated to speeches by Suffolk County GOP Chairman Jesse Garcia, state chairman Nick Langworthy (who is also running for Congress in New York’s 23d district, but could spare the time from a district Donald Trump carried by 17 points in 2020), Nassau County executive Bruce Blakeman (who was elected in the red wave that swept the Island in 2021), Zeldin’s running mate, NYPD Deputy Inspector Alison Esposito (not to be confused with former NYPD detective Anthony D’Esposito, who is the House candidate in my district on the Island), and then finally Zeldin and DeSantis.

This was a very law enforcement-heavy and pro-cop, anti-crime crowd. Langworthy and Blakeman pulled no punches in their warmup speeches: Langworthy said of the supporters of New York’s bail reform laws, “there’s blood on their hands,” and Blakeman urged the crowd to “get down to business throwing out those government officials who masked our kids…and sent our senior citizens back to nursing homes to die!” Esposito zeroed in on Hochul’s big gaffe at the debate, when Zeldin pressed her to talk about actually locking up criminals, and she responded, “I don’t know why that’s so important to you.”


Langworthy also set what would become the central theme of the night, repeated by both Zeldin and DeSantis: that Zeldin would be “our own Ron DeSantis” for New York. A skeptic might say that New York is too ungovernable for a governor in the Ron DeSantis mold to have a similar impact, and it is surely true that getting the Democrat-run state legislature on board would be a harder slog, but New Yorkers of a certain age remember being told the same thing about an ungovernable state and city before Rudy Giuliani became mayor of New York City in 1993 and George Pataki was elected governor of the state in 1994 — leading to positive changes in the state’s day-to-day life as dramatic as any in American political experience in the past three decades.

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The two headliners are, at first glance, quite similar. DeSantis, at 44, is the nation’s youngest governor; Zeldin, at 42, would supplant him for that title if elected. Both served in Iraq; both have law degrees and have been prosecutors. Both were elected as Tea Party congressmen, then served together in the House during the Trump era and adapted themselves accordingly. Both are fathers of two daughters, although Zeldin’s girls are teenagers and DeSantis also has a son. Zeldin has survived leukemia; DeSantis has seen his wife through breast cancer. DeSantis is an Italian Catholic in the South, Zeldin a Jewish Republican, making both of them outsiders of a sort. DeSantis was an eyewitness to the congressional baseball shooting, having passed and spoken with the assassin on his way out of the practice; Zeldin survived an attempted stabbing while giving a speech upstate during this campaign.

DeSantis played up the parallels. His speech settled into a recurring callout: Here’s what I did in Florida, New York didn’t do it, but Lee Zeldin will. They also offered bookends: Zeldin talked about why people are leaving New York, and DeSantis talked about why New Yorkers are coming to Florida. Those themes recurred across issues: vaccine and mask mandates, taxes, crime, parents’ rights in education, rogue prosecutors who won’t enforce the law. Zeldin emphasized, in terms that could have come straight from a DeSantis stump speech, that “A parent has a fundamental right to control the upbringing of their children, and they do not relinquish that right when they send their children off to school.” DeSantis argued that New York has twice the budget of Florida with 3 million fewer people, worse infrastructure, higher debt, and worse educational results. He talked about rebuilding a bridge to Pine Island in three days after the latest hurricane, and offered to sell oceanfront real estate in Arizona to anyone who thinks Hochul could do the same thing in New York. (The Second Avenue subway line began opening stops in 2017, but is still a decade from completion; it was first proposed in 1920).

But there were also noticeable contrasts in style. Zeldin is a little bit nebbishy, and comfortable with self-deprecating humor. He talked about the importance of humility. He noted that he is the fourth-ranking person in his own household and would stay that way if elected. He contrasted this with Hochul calling herself the “mother” of the state, and calling voters her “apostles.” “I promise you, if elected governor, at no point will I refer to myself as the father of New York’s 62 counties.” He also offered a humorous riff on how he wasn’t sure he’d have the courage to show up today after actor Mark Ruffalo made a video attacking him. “And then Leonardo diCaprio retweeted it! I was crushed!”

DeSantis doesn’t do self-deprecating; he radiates intensity and swagger. In fact, his entire presentation on the stump is a testament to the power of narrative. DeSantis isn’t naturally charming or funny. Crowds warm to him because he offers them a story of accomplishment and victory, backed by specific fights he had and won, specific things he did. He rarely rails with futility against unstoppable forces; like Giuliani 30 years ago, his message is this can be done, I did this, I fought and won, come with me if you want to win. For the Republican voters of Long Island, desperate to be heard, this is a powerful message. I was at the Mets-Padres game when Jacob deGrom took the mound, the wounded ace at home with the team down to an elimination game, and the mood tonight was much the same combination of desperate determination. Langworthy set the stakes: “This is our last stand in the State of New York.” If DeSantis runs nationally, he won’t be selling the sizzle, he’ll be selling the steak to people who are hungry for it.

In what might in some quarters be a nod to the next presidential race, DeSantis emphasized in his endorsement of Zeldin how nice it is to vote for somebody who is not just a lesser evil:


He stuck the landing, too:


 


DougMacG

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #121 on: November 10, 2022, 03:33:32 AM »
Here's how you avoid runoffs and cheating, DeSantis won by more than a million and a half votes, in a state that was evenly divided in 2000 and in his first Governor election in 2018. Worthy opponent, Crist is a former Gov of Florida.

Governor · Florida
From The Associated Press
Ron DeSantis wins · 99% reporting ·Associated Press

Ron DeSantis
Republican Party
59.4%
4,609,110

Charlie Crist
Democratic Party
40%
3,102,136
« Last Edit: November 10, 2022, 03:45:39 AM by DougMacG »

Crafty_Dog

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NRO: The DeSantis Difference
« Reply #122 on: November 11, 2022, 04:47:57 PM »
The DeSantis Difference

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis speaks at a press conference in Daytona Beach, Fla., November 22, 2021.(Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
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By MICHAEL BRENDAN DOUGHERTY
November 11, 2022 6:30 AM
His approach to the Covid crisis was a triumph of conservative statesmanship.
In the 2022 midterms, Florida was another country entirely. While Republicans underperformed in much of the nation, Ron DeSantis and Marco Rubio posted absolutely enormous wins against their Democratic opponents. DeSantis’s win — much larger than the generous one expected of him — immediately changed the conversation about 2024. His own supporters began chanting, hilariously, “Two More Years” at his victory party. GOP megadonors began declaring their interest in him. And former president Donald Trump began raging and sulking about him.

When was it that DeSantis’s brand diverged so much from Donald Trump’s? It is being presently forgotten. But if you had predicted four years ago that Republicans closely associated with Donald Trump’s brand were getting massacred in the 2022 elections, you would have assumed DeSantis was the first goner, having only squeaked by in 2018, and having done those ads that seemed to have no other purpose than to impress the Donald himself.

Instead DeSantis triumphed with a 20-point win.

I have cast about among friends and colleagues for their answer to why. They cited his competent governance. The fact that he became the locus of hostile media attention for a long time, but thrived. That he was organized and tactically sound. He had an unerring sense of where the electorate was, and how much room for maneuver he had. For instance, he occupies the governor’s mansion of the most pro-choice red state. And so his position on abortion, restricting it only after 15 weeks’ gestation, was more liberal than the policies pursued by Ohio or Texas. But on the issues related to transgenderism and children, he could pursue aggressive policies, knowing that he had the backing of 70 to 80 percent of the electorate. One friend said Trump was all talk, but DeSantis was a culture warrior with substance.

These are all important factors. But the truth is simpler and more profound. DeSantis understood his job.

In the speech he delivered to the National Conservatism Conference in September, he bragged about his state’s success due to his approach on Covid. Florida had prioritized keeping schools open. And businesses open, too. The results in test scores, economic recovery, and in-migration told a very obvious story. At the conference and in many speeches since, these are all huge applause lines.

While DeSantis says that he championed freedom, in Florida he did so in a way that wasn’t strictly ideological. In fact, he earned objections from libertarians and some conservatives when he banned businesses from instituting vaccine passports for entry and from instituting vaccine mandates for employees. But he explained that his job as a statesman (and yes, he used that word) was not to listen only to the experts in narrow fields, but to “harmonize” the diverse interests of the state he governs.

The approach DeSantis took had the insight that the new Covid-era restrictions were rapidly altering social relations between enterprises and customers, and between employers and employees — for the worse. Only where the data were extremely compelling — as in the need to protect the people in nursing homes — would the state take drastic action that disrupted normal life.

If you can describe the ideology of DeSantis’s approach, it was one of conserving the social fabric. You were free to be as careful as you wanted to be, but you weren’t free to change the social order. In Florida, you could have business meetings unmasked. In Florida, you weren’t going to be subjected to a permanent, or even temporary, biomedical security state that threatened your job. Just as before, you could expect your private medical decisions to remain your business, and not that of your human-resources department. Your kids could go to school, and socialize, and see their speech therapist unmasked. You could be who you are in Florida: a businessman, a kid on a softball team, a hypochondriac, or a vax-skeptic.

DeSantis’s approach seemed outrageous to some: He was defying expert advice. But it had a small-l libertarian humility to it, an understanding that a crisis will pass. This form of leadership had the effect of tempering the moral manias that afflicted so many institutions and cities across the country. That’s what attracted so many hundreds of thousands of people to Florida the past two and half years. And Florida’s success likely inspired other states to give up on these alterations to the social order earlier than they otherwise would have.

DeSantis is going to get absolutely Olympian praise on the right in the coming weeks and months, for all sorts of reasons. Some of them true, some of them mercenary, some of them just because he’s the best option not named Donald J. Trump. But his approach to the Covid crisis was a triumph of conservative statesmanship. Which is to say, it was anti-ideological, and by being so, it served well the diverse, strange, and prosperous society that we call Florida.

Crafty_Dog

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Fed judge blocks DeSantis' WOKE ACT
« Reply #123 on: November 19, 2022, 03:31:24 PM »

Judge Blocks Florida’s Anti-Woke Law At Colleges And Universities
Ron DeSantis Holds Election Night Event In Tampa
(Photo by Octavio Jones/Getty Images)

Daily Caller News Foundation logo


A federal judge on Thursday blocked Florida’s “Stop W.O.K.E. Act,” signed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, from being enforced at colleges and universities.

U.S. District Judge Mark Walker ruled Thursday that the legislation, which prohibits faculty from teaching race in a way that might induce “guilt, anguish or other psychological distress,” cannot be enforced at higher education institutions calling it “positively dystopian.” The ruling comes after two lawsuits by a Florida A&M professor and University of South Florida student and professor who argued the act was unconstitutional. (RELATED: Gov. DeSantis Signs ‘Parental Rights’ Bill Into Law)

“Striking at the heart of ‘open-mindedness and critical inquiry,’ the State of Florida has taken over the ‘marketplace of ideas’ to suppress disfavored viewpoints and limit where professors may shine their light on eight specific ideas,” Walker wrote. “And Defendants’ argument permits zero restraint on the State of Florida’s power to expand its limitation on viewpoints to any idea it chooses.”

Under the law, professors who teach race in a way that induces guilt or blame in the classroom could be fired or penalized. Professors accused of violating the law would be reviewed by faculty members and could be fired if given an “unsatisfactory review”

DeSantis signed the “Stop W.O.K.E Act” into law in April, and it became effective on July 1. Walker blocked another aspect of the law in August, which prohibited businesses from implementing race-related training programs.

“The Stop W.O.K.E. Act protects the open exchange of ideas by prohibiting teachers or employers who hold agency over others from forcing discriminatory concepts on students as part of classroom instruction or on employees as a condition of maintaining employment,” DeSantis’ office said in a statement to the Daily Caller News Foundation. “An ‘open-minded and critical’ environment necessitates that one is free from discrimination. We intend to appeal.”

Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at a campaign rally at the Cheyenne Saloon on November 7, 2022 in Orlando, Florida. DeSantis faces former Democratic Gov. Charlie Crist in tomorrow's general election. (Photo by Octavio Jones/Getty Images)
Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at a campaign rally at the Cheyenne Saloon on November 7, 2022 in Orlando, Florida. DeSantis faces former Democratic Gov. Charlie Crist in tomorrow’s general election. (Photo by Octavio Jones/Getty Images)

In his opinion, Walker quoted “1984” by George Orwell.

“‘It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen,’ and the powers in charge of Florida’s public university system have declared the State has unfettered authority to muzzle its professors in the name of ‘freedom,’” Walker wrote

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #124 on: November 22, 2022, 05:41:30 AM »
Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at the Republican Jewish Coalition Annual Leadership Meeting in Las Vegas, Nev., on Nov. 19, 2022. (Wade Vandervort/AFP via Getty Images)
REPUBLICANS
Florida Offers ‘Blueprint for Success’: DeSantis Says at Major GOP Gathering in Las Vegas
By Rita Li November 21, 2022 Updated: November 21, 2022biggersmaller Print

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a potential presidential hopeful in 2024, said during the weekend that the midterm results show that the Sunshine State presents a “blueprint for success” for the Republican Party looking forward.

“What the election results in Florida show is that Florida really has a blueprint for success,” DeSantis told the influential crowd of Republican leaders, donors, and activists at the annual leadership meeting of the Republican Jewish Coalition on Nov. 19.

“What we’ve shown in Florida is you can stand up for truth, you can stand on principle, you can fight the woke elite, and you can win,” DeSantis said during his 25-minute speech, which generates the most applause including multiple standing ovations.

Beginning a day earlier, the Las Vegas gathering was seen as the first major GOP cattle call in the next White House race, featuring about 10 possible presidential candidates in the 2024 GOP nomination race, such as former President Donald Trump, former Vice President Mike Pence, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley, and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, most of whom addressed in person.

Despite securing one of the biggest wins in the midterm elections, rising GOP star DeSantis declined to address a 2024 speculation. Trump has recently taken to calling the governor “Ron DeSanctimonious,” and warned that DeSantis running in 2024 would be “a mistake.”

The Florida governor, who won the reelection with a double-digit lead over his Democrat rival, began his Saturday night speech by underscoring the fresh landslide victory and the Republican leadership across his state.

“We added four new Republican congressmen to the U.S. House of Representatives from the state of Florida,” DeSantis said after taking the stage. “We secured supermajorities in the Florida legislature, the most Republicans we’ve ever had in Florida history.”


“We dominated with independent voters, we secured record margins with Hispanic voters, we swept the suburbs all across the state of Florida. Our margins with rural voters were gravity-defying, we won by double digits, Miami Dade County. We won for the first time in almost 40 years, Palm Beach County.”

After taking office in 2018, DeSantis rolled out policy initiatives during his first term as a governor, such as fighting against woke indoctrination and the Disney corporation’s political activism.

“It is wrong to teach a kid that they were born in the wrong body. It is wrong to teach them that gender is a choice,” he reiterated, saying common sense is in “very short supply” nowadays.

DeSantis said a leader should never “stick your finger in the wind and try to contort yourself to wherever public opinion may be trending on one given moment,” but set out a vision, execute it, and deliver concrete results.

“And when you do that, the people respond,” the governor continued. “When you show people you’re willing to fight for them, they will walk over broken glass barefoot to come vote for you and that’s exactly what they did to me.”

“What we’ve shown is people respond to strong leadership,” he spotlighted.

After riding the endorsement of then-President Trump in the contested 2018 gubernatorial race, DeSantis barely won what was known as a swing state for many years.

More conservatives rallied behind DeSantis in the wake of the November midterms, as Republicans underperform expectations across the country outside of several states like Florida and New York. Some Republicans blame Trump, though a number of others noted he was not on the ballot. Some said DeSantis’s big win portended a strong result if he runs in 2024.

ccp

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #125 on: November 22, 2022, 08:39:40 AM »
"Some Republicans blame Trump, though a number of others noted he was not on the ballot. "

I dunno
every Dem in the country put Trump front and center 24/7
so his name was not on the ballot in writing but it was on the minds to some extent with every voter

so to say trump was not an issue is ridiculous



DougMacG

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #126 on: November 22, 2022, 10:05:12 AM »
"to say trump was not an issue is ridiculous"

   
Yes, Trump was on the ballot.  Every exit poll confirms he was a major motivator for opposition.  The test of it, had Republicans swept with his candidates, Oz, Masters, Bolduc, Walker, etc.  who would have taken credit?
« Last Edit: November 22, 2022, 01:33:39 PM by DougMacG »





Crafty_Dog

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NR: Let's go with Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #131 on: December 02, 2022, 03:40:59 PM »
third


The Case for Putting It All on Ron DeSantis
By MICHAEL BRENDAN DOUGHERTY
December 2, 2022 6:30 AM

Do I need to see more of Trump? No. Nor Nikki Haley, Mike Pence, or Mike Pompeo.

After the shortest possible amount of time, and the minimal amount of evidence, I’ve seen enough. I’m ready to bet the future of the Republican Party on Ron DeSantis. Let’s just get on with Ron.

The case is simple. While Donald Trump’s 2016 candidacy was remarkably efficient at attracting the precise number of voters it needed in the precise states to narrowly win the Electoral College, the Republican Party under Trump has repelled voters faster than it attracted them. It posted losses among white women and white men that could not be offset by gains among Hispanic voters. Ron DeSantis is the only figure in the Republican Party who has substantially expanded the appeal of the GOP in this recent era.

Donald Trump has unique attributes as a candidate that are useless to deny. He has star power. He is genuinely funny. And, most hateful to admit, his moral deficiencies come with political advantages. His shamelessness allows him to overpromise to every possible voting bloc. The intensely polarized dynamic he can establish with his establishment antagonists — Donald contra mundum — is intoxicating to Trump’s devoted supporters.

Trump is also profoundly unpopular outside of the Republican Party. He unites, outrages, and mobilizes the Democratic Party and many independents against him, the same way that Hillary Clinton united the Republican Party and many independents against her. And there are tremendous downsides to a Trump sequel. The chaotic nature of his first administration is likely to be exacerbated in a second. And he will not be eligible to run again in 2028. He will be nearly as old as Joe Biden was when he was elected.

The case against having an overcrowded field of underwhelming candidates for the Republican nomination is obvious. The effect is to diminish everyone. And the result will be to advantage Donald Trump, who starts with universal name recognition and all that star power.

Hundreds of thousands of people moved to Florida during Ron DeSantis’s first term as governor. They did so because DeSantis made a different choice on how to handle Covid-19, different from the establishment, and even from Donald Trump. Not all of these people were Republicans when they sought refuge in Florida, but the evidence on the voter-registration rolls suggests that many have become Republicans in Florida. DeSantis’s strong encouragement for schools to open benefited Florida students and won him fans nationwide, particularly among suburban moms who hated school closures, masked developmental therapies for their children, and the hasty imposition of Covid-19 vaccine mandates.

DeSantis was the figure in this era who made the Republican emphasis on removing the heavy hand of government appealing to entirely new groups of voters. Anecdotally, I know many Hillary 2016 voters who are all on board for DeSantis in 2024. Some were on the crunchier, skeptical left. Others were in what you might call the Joe Rogan middle. Public-health conformism and errors during the pandemic drove them to the political right. Why? Because of figures such as DeSantis. The cultural fights he has picked on education and gender ideology speak to their concerns. He is a conservative statesman who understands that present emergencies should not impel us to rashly alter ways of life that exist for a reason. That’s why he is already as effective a fund-raiser in the party as Donald Trump is.

And then there is the most obvious reason to bet on DeSantis. He can unite the Republican Party. The party may disagree deeply about trade, the rate and type of immigration that is useful, and foreign policy. But most Republicans seem to be able to agree on him.

He has a deep appeal to Trump voters who appreciate how DeSantis has taken up Trump’s mantle against the media and even big “woke” corporations. He appeals to anti-Trump voters, who see in him a bridge from the party as Trump re-created it — and a future where they aren’t embarrassed to pull the lever for Republicans. His political success compels Republicans to trust his instincts. His competence reassures independents.

Do I need to see more of Trump? No. Nor Nikki Haley, Mike Pence, or Mike Pompeo. I don’t want 18 months of drama. Just pencil in Ron and move on.



Crafty_Dog

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Prepare for DeScovery!
« Reply #134 on: December 23, 2022, 10:49:18 AM »
FLORIDA TO PFIZER: PREPARE FOR DeSCOVERY… Florida Supreme Court Approves Ron DeSantis’ Grand Jury To Investigate Pharma Companies

The Florida Supreme Court approved GOP Gov. Ron DeSantis’ request to convene a grand jury to investigate any wrongdoing related to the Covid-19 vaccines.

DeSantis called for the investigation in a Dec. 13 petition to the court, which goes through claims made by pharmaceutical companies and government officials about how covid-19 vaccines could “reduce the spread of disease.”

The petition also goes into detail about alleged vaccine-induced myocarditis among males aged 18-39 in particular, based on Florida Department of Health figures, according to the petition.

“The pharmaceutical industry has a notorious history of misleading the public for financial gain. Questions have been raised regarding the veracity of the representations made by the pharmaceutical manufacturers of COVID-19 vaccines, particularly with respect to transmission, prevention, efficacy, and safety. An investigation is warranted to determine whether the pharmaceutical industry has engaged in fraudulent practices,” the petition states.

It focuses on Covid-19 manufacturers Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, the companies’ executives and other public health organizations who promoted the vaccines in Florida, the petition shows.


DougMacG

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis, second inaugural
« Reply #136 on: January 04, 2023, 09:49:00 AM »
Calling Florida a “promised land of sanity” in a sea of cities being destroyed by woke ideology, DeSantis noted that “Many of these cities and states have embraced faddish ideology at the expense of enduring principles. They have harmed public safety by coddling criminals and attacking law enforcement. They have imposed unreasonable burdens on taxpayers to finance unfathomable levels of public spending. They have harmed education by subordinating the interests of students and parents to partisan interest groups.”

“They have imposed medical authoritarianism in the guise of pandemic mandates and restrictions that lack a scientific basis. [applause] This bizarre, but prevalent, ideology that permeates these policy measures purports to act in the name of justice for the marginalized, but it frowns upon American institutions, it rejects merit and achievement, and it advocates identity essentialism,” said DeSantis.

The crowd went wild when he declared: “We reject this woke ideology! We seek normalcy, not philosophical lunacy! We will not allow reality, facts, and truth to become optional. We will never surrender to the woke mob. Florida is where woke goes to die!”
   - via PJMedia

ccp

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Byron York
« Reply #137 on: January 04, 2023, 11:20:15 AM »


Crafty_Dog

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Gov. DeSantis seeks to ban Chinese entities from purchasing FL property
« Reply #139 on: January 12, 2023, 12:32:02 PM »
DeSantis Seeks to Ban China-Based Entities From Purchasing Florida Property
By Andrew Thornebrooke
January 11, 2023Updated: January 12, 2023

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is considering a move to ban Chinese entities from purchasing property in the state because of the economic and security risks posed by  China’s communist regime.

“If you look at the Chinese Communist Party, they’ve been very active throughout the Western Hemisphere in gobbling up land and investing in different things,” DeSantis said during a press conference on Jan. 10.

“And, you know, when they have interests that are opposed to ours, and you’ve seen how they’ve wielded their authority … it is not in the best interests of Florida to have the Chinese Communist Party owning farmland, owning land close to military bases.”

The remarks follow warnings from security experts and lawmakers that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), which rules China as a single-party state, is seeking to purchase strategic parcels of land throughout the United States from which it can conduct espionage or otherwise sabotage U.S. national security interests.

In recent years, Chinese land purchases in Texas and North Dakota, which both were situated near U.S. military bases, raised alarm among locals and policymakers in state and federal governments.

DeSantis said that the CCP has “taken a much more Marxist–Leninist turn” under current Party leader Xi Jinping and suggested that communist China is now a “hostile nation.”

“We do not need to have CCP influence in Florida’s economy,” he said.

Chinese investors purchased more than $6 billion in U.S. real estate between March 2021 and March 2022, according to the National Association of Realtors, making it the largest foreign buyer in terms of dollars spent.

Florida has been at the center of that purchasing binge, with 24 percent of all foreign property purchases in the nation occurring there. The state with the next highest amount of foreign purchases was California, which accounted for 11 percent.

DeSantis described the CCP’s influence in U.S. society as “very insidious” and, to that end, said that he’s not only concerned with the CCP seeking out farmland, but also wanted to terminate its access to residential properties.

“Why would you want them buying residential developments and things like that?” he said. “I don’t want them owning subdivisions and things like that.”

While outrage over the issue has been widespread in recent months, there have been relatively few concrete actions taken to curb the buying of U.S. land by CCP-aligned organizations.

Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-Wash.) introduced legislation in November 2022 that would “prohibit the purchase of public or private agricultural land in the United States by foreign nationals associated with the Government of the People’s Republic of China.”

Likewise, Reps. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.) and Rick Crawford (R-Ark.) introduced legislation to improve national security by “preventing foreign adversaries from taking any ownership or control of the United States agriculture industry.”

There may be some movement on the issue. The House voted this week to establish a select committee to investigate issues related to the strategic competition between the United States and the Chinese Communist Party. That effort as well could help to shed light on the risk posed by CCP front companies that seek toscoop up U.S. land.

Still, there is the problem of identifying which companies are acting on behalf of the CCP, an issue that DeSantis said would need to be addressed to make any ban effective and fair.

“The issue is going to be, obviously, if someone comes in and buys, it’s not the CCP that’s signing that,” DeSantis said. “These are holding companies … So you have to structure that in a way that will effectively police it.”

ccp

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Trump will "handle" DeSantis if he runs
« Reply #140 on: January 17, 2023, 07:19:06 AM »

In his usual petty obnoxious fashion taking credit
for another's success, and making it about himself and his ego rather then what is good for the country and us :

https://www.yahoo.com/news/trump-possibility-ron-desantis-running-081608179.html

I don't want to relive Trump again ..     Boy I hope I don't "have to" vote for him.


Crafty_Dog

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NR: DeSantis right to block FL African American Studies course
« Reply #143 on: January 24, 2023, 03:42:07 PM »
DeSantis Is Right on African-American Studies

Florida governor Ron DeSantis speaks in a neighborhood impacted by Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers, Fla., October 5, 2022.(Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images)
By RICH LOWRY
January 24, 2023 6:30 AM

With the state of American historical and civic knowledge in near collapse, who thinks high-school students need to be brushing up on ‘Black Queer Studies’?

Florida governor Ron DeSantis stands accused of a long parade of horribles to which has now been added a new count — allegedly opposing the teaching of African-American history.

Florida rejected the College Board’s pilot Advanced Placement African American Studies course, and the decision has been treated in progressive quarters like the curricular equivalent of George Wallace standing in the schoolhouse door.

White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre called the state’s decision “incomprehensible.” DeSantis wants to “block,” according to Jean-Pierre, “the study of Black Americans.” She noted, ominously, “These types of actions aren’t new, especially from what we’re seeing from Florida, sadly.”

Florida state senator Shevrin Jones, a Democrat, said the rejection of the course amounts to a “whitewash” of American history. Jones maintains that “we’re back at square one, seeing that we once again have to defend ourselves to be legitimate in America.”

Never mind that there’s obviously a difference between objecting to the ideological content of a pilot course that hasn’t yet been adopted and erasing the history of African Americans as such.

This is the typical game of pretending that the only way to teach the history of African Americans is through the tendentious political lens favored by the Left.

When red states push back against critical race theory, its proponents make it sound as if students will, as a consequence, never learn about the Transatlantic slave trade, the 13th Amendment, or Frederick Douglass.

This is preposterous. No reasonable person opposes teaching American history fully and truthfully. (In Florida, the controversial “Stop WOKE Act” itself stipulates that instructors should teach the history of African peoples, the Middle Passage, the experience of slavery, abolition, and the effects of segregation and other forms of discrimination.)

The problem is when the curriculum is used as an ideological weapon to inculcate a distorted, one-sided worldview, and here, Florida has the College Board dead to rights.

The College Board hasn’t released the pilot curriculum publicly, but, as conservative writer Stanley Kurtz and a publication called the Florida Standard have documented, it really goes off the rails when it addresses contemporary issues. The curriculum presents the Black Lives Matter and reparations movements favorably and recommends the writings of a clutch of writers on the left, from Robin D. G. Kelley to Michelle Alexander, without rejoinder.

Bias aside, with the state of American historical and civic knowledge in near collapse, who thinks high-school students need to be brushing up on “Black Queer Studies”? The curriculum explains that this topic “explores the concept of queer color critique, grounded in Black feminism and intersectionality, as a Black studies lens that shifts sexuality studies towards racial analysis.”

Surely, if anyone wants to marinate in this dreck, he or she can wait to do it in college, which specializes in wasting the time of students and spreading ridiculous cant and lies.

This is the more fundamental point. Such “studies” programs — African-American, women’s, queer, etc. — are intellectually corrupt and inherently biased at the university level and should be kept far away from the realm of K–12 public education.

It shouldn’t be a surprise that an AP curriculum developed with the input of practitioners of African-American studies at the university level would contain all the same perversities and warped ideas.

Florida should be commended for saying “no,” and other states that care about sound education should do the same.

African-American history is American history. It should be taught — and has been — as an inherent part of the American story. Only when we are confident that all students know that story should we be willing to entertain further specialization, and never if it is the poisoned fruit of “identitarian” courses at universities that take it as a given that their students should be encouraged to thoughtlessly adopt progressive attitudes and beliefs.

This fight isn’t about blocking history or erasing the country’s sins but drawing a line between hifalutin political advocacy and thorough, truthful instruction in the American past.

© 2023 by King Features Syndicate

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Gov. Ron DeSantis does a teacher two-step
« Reply #144 on: January 26, 2023, 03:08:56 AM »
DeSantis Does a Teacher Pay Two-Step
The Governor offers teachers a pay raise with protection from coerced union dues.
By The Editorial BoardFollow
Updated Jan. 25, 2023 6:34 pm ET

Florida’s population is growing fast, which means it needs more teachers. That’s the motivation behind Gov. Ron DeSantis’s new proposal to give teachers a raise while making it harder for unions to withhold pay before teachers see it.

Gov. DeSantis announced a plan Monday to pass a Teachers’ Bill of Rights and spend an extra $200 million on teacher pay in the coming school year. The funds will bring the total the state has spent on teacher salaries to more than $3 billion from 2020 to 2024. They’ll also lift the minimum salary to more than $48,000, eighth-highest among states according to the National Education Association.

Addressing a classroom in a Jacksonville school, the Governor said the money would help ward off a teacher shortage. “The nationwide average is three vacancies for every school,” he said, while Florida has kept average openings to about half that level.

Yet the plan devotes as much attention to making sure teachers get the full benefit of the their pay raise. It proposes a policy known as paycheck protection, which blocks schools from extracting member dues on unions’ behalf. Teachers would still be free to join or decline the union, but they would get a clearer sense of what they’re paying if they do.

The change would make a difference since Florida teachers can pay as much as $700 in annual dues, according to the Orlando Sentinel. “If you want to do it, send money—that’s fine,” as Gov. DeSantis put it. But the Florida Education Association (FEA) spends millions of dollars on political causes and candidates that many teachers don’t support, such as its unsuccessful 2020 lawsuit to block school reopenings.

The Governor also wants to ensure that teachers get their raises on time. “Not every school district has raised the teacher salaries like they’re required to,” he said of his previous expansions of school budgets. It’s common for schools to leave such funds undisbursed during internal budgeting squabbles, but boosting recruitment and retention requires making the pay available fast.

In a statement about the raises, the FEA complained that the bulk of the pay would go to newer teachers, saying long-term educators faced an “experience penalty.” It’s an ironic attack because the union opposed the introduction of merit pay for teachers when former Gov. Rick Scott enacted it in 2011. They want their members to be compensated for clock punches and time served but not based on their performance.

The DeSantis plan addresses a real problem and combines it with clever politics to increase the attractiveness of teaching in Florida. Union leaders are showing their hand by criticizing a plan that leaves teachers better off without a guaranteed cut for the union middlemen