Author Topic: Crime and punishment  (Read 11085 times)


ccp

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ccp

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shoplifter thrown to curb
« Reply #52 on: January 16, 2023, 06:55:12 AM »
https://pjmedia.com/culture/athena-thorne/2023/01/15/watch-guitar-hero-tosses-would-be-shoplifter-to-the-curb-n1662051

good thing shoplifter is not Black
otherwise Crump Sharpton Obama would be all over this

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Crime and punishment
« Reply #53 on: January 16, 2023, 07:47:20 AM »
We've been having a good time with this one in my martial arts circles  :-D






ccp

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Atlanta and Chicago homicide rates
« Reply #59 on: February 27, 2023, 08:19:27 AM »
lets see

homicide rate in Atlanta is 19.53/100,000

homicide rate for Chicago is 18.26/100,000

according to this :

https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/murder-map-deadliest-u-s-cities/39/

 :roll:  the LEFT will say anything
« Last Edit: February 27, 2023, 05:18:06 PM by Crafty_Dog »


G M

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The Floyd Effect
« Reply #61 on: March 12, 2023, 09:27:47 AM »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Crime and punishment
« Reply #62 on: March 12, 2023, 05:13:47 PM »
That is a very challenging article.

As I read it I had moments wondering if he was sometimes blurring the distinction between "murdered" and "murderer".

Given the implications of the article, it is very important that this be gotten right.

ccp

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look what white supremacy has done
« Reply #63 on: March 13, 2023, 11:45:16 AM »
wonder what he is going to buy with the stolen cash?
https://www.yahoo.com/news/houston-woman-left-unable-walk-171448057.html

milk?
food?
sneakers?
a basket ball?
down payment for a text book for school?
help pay for his mother's diabetes medicine?
what do ya think?

G M

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Re: look what white supremacy has done
« Reply #64 on: March 14, 2023, 07:15:24 AM »
wonder what he is going to buy with the stolen cash?
https://www.yahoo.com/news/houston-woman-left-unable-walk-171448057.html

milk?
food?
sneakers?
a basket ball?
down payment for a text book for school?
help pay for his mother's diabetes medicine?
what do ya think?

Black Crime Matters




ccp

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elizabeth holmes
« Reply #68 on: May 07, 2023, 07:58:29 AM »
https://dnyuz.com/2023/05/07/liz-holmes-wants-you-to-forget-about-elizabeth/

con artist cons
again

prosecutors judges

so get of jail card is granted if one suddenly has babies ?

since when is that a defense ?

so frustrating

crime and punishment  --->

crime and no punishment

the state of our two tiered legal system today


ccp

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larceny essentially legal in some locations
« Reply #70 on: May 14, 2023, 08:58:28 AM »
https://hotair.com/john-s-2/2023/05/12/story-on-san-francisco-shoplifting-confirms-there-are-no-consequences-n550475

crime and punishment

I could have never imagined yrs ago we would have leaders who only enforce laws  that suits them and simply not enforce those they do not like .

and they keep expanding the free stuff crowd and stirring up anger over race sexual preference and gender to decide what they will and will not enforce

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Crime and punishment
« Reply #71 on: May 14, 2023, 04:55:02 PM »
You and me both. :cry: :cry: :cry:


G M

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Massively drop your homicide rate with this one weird trick!
« Reply #73 on: June 11, 2023, 08:23:42 PM »
https://traditionsofconflict.substack.com/p/gebusi-homicide-and-the-cultural

It must have really hurt them to begrudgingly discuss the role Christianity played.








ccp

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Re: Crime and punishment
« Reply #81 on: September 10, 2023, 11:33:44 AM »
"The prosecution of Danny Masterson - and other cases like it - undermine that very need for speed that is so critical for the security of the American citizenry.

There are exceptions, yes.  Some crimes, such as treason, certainly should have no statutes of limitations. But these exceptions should be as rare as possible, because the reasons listed above are still applicable to every case.  "

what about tax fraud that was know but simply not pursued by prosecutors strictly to protect a favored politician and family?


Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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PP on FBI Crime Stats
« Reply #84 on: October 23, 2023, 09:49:19 AM »
The Real Spin Cycle on FBI Crime Stats
The Leftmedia made nary a peep about soft-on-crime or anti-police policies, instead blaming guns and a virus.

Nate Jackson


The FBI's annual report on crime in the nation isn't what it used to be. As the FBI updates its methods for reporting crimes, and the Leftmedia ramps up its efforts to blame guns and COVID and to make the narrative about crime be one of victim groups, getting to the truth can be a challenge.

The FBI says that "national violent crime decreased an estimated 1.7% in 2022 compared to 2021 estimates." Murder dropped 6.1%, rape fell 5.4%, and assault and robbery both decreased a little more than 1%. That's great news, right? Maybe.

The problem is that the previous year didn't have all the data. And by not all the data, we mean that, as the Associated Press notes, "nearly two-fifths of all policing agencies failed to participate, including big cities like New York, Los Angeles and Miami."

This year's report was better, but it still had holes. "In 2022, 83% of US law enforcement agencies submitted data to the federal government, which means that about 10% of the population is not represented in this data," The Guardian reports.

Also remember that a lot of reporting to police is voluntary, and crimes like rapes and robberies are not always reported.

With the caveats out of the way, we'll move to the politicization of crime. As far as the Leftmedia is concerned, it's all about who or what you blame for crime.

Naturally, most outlets blame "an increase in guns," as NPR framed it. NPR also says crime rose in both Alabama and Massachusetts, so it can't be blamed on Democrats. The AP offers this bit of related misinformation: "Gun-safety advocates decry the loosening of gun laws, especially in conservative-leaning states around the U.S." As if law-abiding Republicans are the ones committing crime.

The FBI report "underscores how pervasive gun violence has become," says The New York Times. In fact, "Firearms were used in almost half a million violent crimes across the country, about the same number as in 2021."

No news reporters seem to care that firearms are also used at least that many times each year to prevent crimes. Nor do they care that firearms sales were increasing for many years while crime went down, or that black women are the fastest-growing demographic of gun buyers, or that law-abiding, permit-holding gun owners are not the ones committing crime.

The Times also offers borderline disinformation: "The profile of the victims has shifted significantly. In 2020, gun violence became the leading cause of death for American children, and in 2022 things became even worse: The number of children killed in shootings increased by almost 12 percent, and those wounded increased by almost 11 percent." As the "fact-checkers" like to say, that's "missing context." Most of those "children" are older adolescents who are involved in gang or drug violence.

Another fascinating and revealing thing from media coverage is the universal effort to blame the coronavirus pandemic, which the AP says "created huge social disruption and upended support systems." To be sure, crime did spike beginning in 2020, but it wasn't caused by a virus from China. (Though maybe Democrats tyrannically shutting down everything might have irritated some people.)

Something else happened in 2020 that ignited "mostly peaceful protests," otherwise known as violence and unrest in urban centers.

That's right — the death of George Floyd, which Joe Biden disgracefully elevated again last week, and the ensuing summer of rage are to blame.

As the Times notes, "There were 25 percent more homicides in 2022 than in 2019." Many of those murders are blacks killed by other blacks. Don't black lives matter?

Speaking of blacks, another big feature of the FBI report was so-called "hate crimes." NPR says, "Black people, Jewish people and gay men were the most likely to be targeted." Well, yeah. Not to be insensitive, but only the Left's select "marginalized" groups can be the victims of hate crime, so it stands to reason that increases would only happen among those groups. And as noted above, however, black-on-black crime is a huge problem. How often is that also true of gays? We've noted the case of Matthew Shepard twice in recent days.

There's so much more to say, but, in short, we're outraged at every robbery, carjacking, and rape. We lament every human life needlessly taken. Yet until the media and our elected representatives tell the truth about crime and its causes, and until the Democrats who've run our cities (into the ground) for decades change their soft-on-crime policies, more property will be destroyed or taken, and more lives will be lost.

Body-by-Guinness

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Re: PP on FBI Crime Stats
« Reply #85 on: October 23, 2023, 03:48:40 PM »
The Real Spin Cycle on FBI Crime Stats
The Leftmedia made nary a peep about soft-on-crime or anti-police policies, instead blaming guns and a virus.

Nate Jackson


Marc, what’s the source for this (very apt) piece? I’d like to cite it elsewhere.

Any The Wire fans here? That show did a dive into “juking the stats,” including the political motivations that inspire it, that was all sorts of telling.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Crime and punishment
« Reply #86 on: October 23, 2023, 05:00:02 PM »
Patriot Post.

I should have said.


Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Riley: No, the criminal justice system is not racist
« Reply #88 on: January 03, 2024, 08:56:05 AM »
No, the Criminal-Justice System Isn’t Racist
Another academic paper finds scant support for the theory that bias causes incarceration disparities.
Jason L. Riley
Jan. 2, 2024 6:34 pm ET

The notion that the U.S. criminal-justice system is stacked against black people has gained currency since the death of George Floyd. It’s often cited as a basis for everything from ending cash bail and closing prisons to legalizing drugs, decriminalizing petty theft and offering reparations to the descendants of slaves. But is it supported by the evidence?

Not according to a new academic paper by two Stetson University sociologists, Christopher Ferguson and Sven Smith. After analyzing 51 studies on sentencing disparities that were published between 2005 and 2022, they conclude that “overrepresentation among perpetrators of crime explains incarceration disparities to a greater degree than does racism in the criminal justice system.” In other words, blacks are incarcerated at higher rates than other groups because they commit crimes at higher rates, not due to systemic bias.

Some of the studies found that “race had little clear impact on criminal adjudication,” while others found that “Black defendants receive more lenient sentences than Whites.” Tellingly, the authors note that “better quality studies were less likely to produce results supportive of disparities,” which raises the possibility that conventional wisdom about race and criminal justice is not only misguided but also drawing on sloppy research.

“Our results suggest that for most crimes, criminal adjudication in the U.S. is not substantially biased on race or class lines,” the researchers write. “For drug crimes there appear to be very small race differences, though confidence in these effects is reduced somewhat due to the quality of many of the studies involved.” These findings, they stress, do not mean “there is not potential for bias in other areas such as police treatment, arrests, or other outcomes,” but “Overall, perceptions of bias in US criminal adjudications do not seem proportionate to the available evidence.”

Some will be eager to dismiss the paper, but it isn’t an outlier. In 2016 Harvard economist Roland Fryer published research on policing that also countered the preferred narrative of social-justice advocates. Mr. Fryer found no evidence of racial bias in fatal police shootings, which he told the New York Times had surprised him. He did find large racial differences in police use of nonlethal force—grabbing and shoving suspects, for example—but concluded: “It is plausible that racial differences in lower level uses of force are simply a distraction and movements such as Black Lives Matter should seek solutions within their own communities rather than changing the behaviors of police and other external forces.”

In 2019 psychologists Joseph Cesario of Michigan State and David Johnson of the University of Maryland published findings that were similar to Mr. Fryer’s. After controlling for race-specific violent-crime rates, they found “no significant evidence of anti-black disparity in the likelihood of being fatally shot by police.” Mr. Fryer has stood by his work, despite considerable blowback, but following the death of George Floyd in 2020, Messrs. Cesario and Johnson retracted their paper.

All the empirical evidence under the sun might not stand a chance against a viral video of Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd, but Messrs. Ferguson and Smith deserve credit for following the facts where they lead and reporting the politically incorrect findings. Academic integrity and courage seem to be in short supply these days, and the paper performs a public service for people who put hard data above political spin.

The authors suggest that policy makers focus on poverty to address these racial imbalances. It’s true that the poor are more likely to engage in violent crime, and that blacks are more likely to be poor. But it’s also true that black violent crime rates were significantly lower in the 1940s and ’50s, when the black population was significantly poorer than it is today, and when racism inside (and outside) the criminal-justice system was rampant and overt.

One difference between then and now is the rate of absent fathers in black communities. Our jails and prisons aren’t teeming with people from intact families. Yet the disintegration of the nuclear family and other cultural problems in low-income neighborhoods where violent crime is common is a topic that few people in academia, politics or the media wish to tackle.

“At present, we believe that the evidence on racial bias in criminal justice adjudication has been poorly communicated to the general public and policymakers,” Messrs. Ferguson and Smith write. “In many cases, it appears that data calling into question beliefs in structural racism in the criminal justice system are simply being ignored, both by scholars in the field and by policy makers.”

Blaming black outcomes on the criminal justice system will do little to help the black underclass, but it helps activists raise money, and it helps politicians secure votes. Don’t expect it to stop anytime soon.


Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: Homicide rates fell sharply in 2023
« Reply #90 on: January 07, 2024, 02:08:27 AM »
Homicide Rates Fell Sharply in 2023 After Rising During Pandemic
Cities like Houston, Los Angeles and Philadelphia saw major declines as police step up efforts
By
Zusha Elinson
Follow
Jan. 6, 2024 9:00 pm ET






Killings were down about 15% in the 10 largest cities last year when compared with the previous year. PHOTO: DAMIAN DOVARGANES/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Homicides in big U.S. cities fell in 2023 after skyrocketing during the first two years of the pandemic.

Killings were down about 15% in the 10 largest cities last year when compared with 2022, according to local government data. That includes a 20% drop in both Philadelphia and Houston and 16% in Los Angeles.

Murders rose in two of the top 10 cities. Dallas reported a 15% increase, while homicides in Austin edged up by 3%.

The overall trend shows that the factors that contributed to an increase in violent confrontations in the early days of the pandemic are receding, police officials and criminologists say.

Shootings are falling as gang-violence prevention programs get back up and running. Domestic killings have declined as families are no longer cooped up together at home. Police are more active after a pullback in enforcement during the racial-justice protests over the murder of George Floyd, according to local officials.

In 2022, murders in the U.S. dropped 6% after rising 4% in 2021 and spiking by nearly 30% in 2020, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The agency isn’t expected to release national crime figures for 2023 until later this year.

Even with declining numbers, Americans remain jittery about crime. A Gallup poll from November found that 63% of the U.S. residents saw crime as a serious problem, up from 54% in 2022 and the highest in at least two decades.

 In the nation’s second-largest city, Los Angeles, homicides dropped for a second straight year.

“We’re not seeing the levels of violence that we saw earlier,” said Michael Moore, the city’s chief of police. “We’re still above where we were in 2019, so there’s a lot more work to be done.”

Los Angeles’s 327 homicides last year were down from a 15-year-high of 402 in 2021. In the early days of the pandemic—with the closure of courts and the release of prisoners due to Covid-19—“the criminal element and others felt it was ‘olly olly oxen free,’ ” said Moore.

With the criminal-justice system up and running again and the city’s army of gang-intervention workers back to heading off rivalries and retaliatory shootings, killings have fallen, he said.

Another major factor: The city’s leadership, which at one time supported calls to “defund the police,” is now pushing to hire more officers, Moore said.


A few major cities like Dallas and Washington, D.C., which isn’t one of the 10 largest, saw increases in homicides in 2023. Killings had declined in Dallas in 2021 and 2022, and the city was considered to be a model for crime prevention with its surgical approach to violent crime hot spots.

Dallas police officials said that nearly two-thirds of the killings last year occurred inside residences or apartment complexes and that more than 70 percent of the people involved were involved in criminal activity or high-risk behavior.

Some criminologists say that the drop in killings is tied most closely to the dissipating effects of the pandemic. During the pandemic, Americans were disconnected from schools, churches, counseling and gang-intervention programs, which resulted in more deadly conflicts, said John Roman, a senior fellow in the Economics, Justice & Society department at NORC at the University of Chicago.

“It teaches us that there are things that work, that police and teachers and social workers and behavioral health workers, they help to keep people from being victimized and committing crimes,” Roman said. “When they weren’t there, everything shot up and they came back and everything started to decline.”

Roman said that the country is headed for prepandemic levels of violent crime but he worries that it will be difficult to go lower because of the increase in guns in civilian hands. Americans bought more than 70 million guns over the past four years.

“The guns weigh heavily on the crime story,” he said

As homicides fell, robberies and burglaries also dropped in the first six months of 2023, compared with the first six months of 2022, according to a study of 37 cities by the Council on Criminal Justice, a nonpartisan think tank. Motor-vehicle thefts rose 33.5% in 32 of those cities in that same period of time. Some police officials say that Hyundais and Kias in particular are inviting targets for thieves because of technology glitches and account for much of the rise.


Crafty_Dog

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Re: Crime and punishment
« Reply #92 on: January 25, 2024, 05:39:32 AM »
Judge is way out of line here.  The jury, the finder of fact, rejected her theory blaming the pot.



Body-by-Guinness

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Re: Man charged after killing a pedo
« Reply #95 on: February 05, 2024, 06:38:57 AM »
https://www.oann.com/newsroom/man-charged-after-allegedly-posing-as-minor-to-lure-and-kill-convicted-sex-offender/

I served on a grand jury a couple months back (we were sworn to secrecy and hence can't get into specifics) and found it to be quite depressing given most of the cases we heard involved meatheads taking, selling, or carrying proscribed substances and then doing something stupid to attract police attention. For fornication's sake, when I was 16 and doing doobies out back of the high school we had more freaking sense than these yoyos casually flinging fentanyl or whatever around.

As that may be, the second eye-opening set of felons were child predators who had supposedly met a 14-year-old girl online they then proceeded to send sundry lewd photos to before arranging a tryst at a local hotel. These short-eyed Romeos would show up at a said low-rent love nest pumped full of Viagra and equipped with sundry sex toys, only to learn their paramour was an overweight cop they'd been whippin' their skippies to while exchanging virtual pleasantries. These reprehensible gents all had done NOTHING to disguise themselves online, leading to the full weight of the law to fall on 'em, which was fine by me and my fellow jurors.

I am still agog that these wretched gents were unable to run a basic cost/benefit analysis: ten years of their life in a hellhole v. a night of sleazy pleasure at a run-down motel. The moral of the story, in other words, is that it seems it doesn't take much in the way of trolling to entice these child predators so this fellow who took things into his own hands probably didn't have to work particularly, ah, hard to lure one into his clutches. Oh, and that you probably shouldn't take a fistful of Viagra while involved in illegal activities as it will leave you looking pretty darn silly while trotting around handcuffed in a prison jumpsuit.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2024, 03:07:34 PM by Body-by-Guinness »


Crafty_Dog

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Re: Crime and punishment
« Reply #97 on: February 05, 2024, 07:40:41 AM »
"Oh, and that you probably shouldn't take a fistful of Viagra while involved in illegal activities as it will leave you looking pretty darn silly while trotting around handcuffed in a prison jumpsuit."

 :-D :-D :-D

Crafty_Dog

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AMcC: Clarifies our understanding of bail in the Constitution and The Law
« Reply #98 on: February 06, 2024, 04:43:23 PM »


https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/mob-illegal-immigrants-maul-cops-new-york-city-get-away-it

Here's how a mob of illegal immigrants can maul cops in New York City and get away with it
In New York City it is now routine to find high-flight-risk offenders released without conditions – and then to find that they flee, often after committing more crimes

By Andrew McCarthy Fox News
Published February 6, 2024 5:00am EST


Nothing is more perilous to the safety of a community than a prosecutor who won’t enforce the law. Yet, in New York, a close second-place goes to a "justice" system in which elected Democrats consciously undermine the community’s capacity to detain dangerous criminals.

If you’re wondering how it could be that a gang of illegal aliens is able to maul two New York City cops near Times Square in broad daylight and on video, consider the toxic combination of those two factors.

It is commonly although mistakenly believed that there is a right to bail – i.e., that a person who has been arrested is supposed to be released from custody pending trial. It is understandable that many of us are under this misimpression. After all, under constitutional due process principles, an accused is presumed innocent; and the Eighth Amendment speaks of setting bail.

But let’s look more carefully. What the amendment says is that "Excessive bail shall not be required." That does not mean bail must be set in every case. It means that in cases in which bail is set – i.e., in cases in which pretrial release is appropriate – the bail terms must not be set so high that a defendant could not possibly meet them.

If a person of sparse means is accused of a petty theft, it would be ridiculous to set bail at, say, $1 million; the accused doesn’t have those kinds of resources, or know people who have them and would be willing to post them on his behalf.

Yet, some crimes are sufficiently serious, and some defendants are so rootless in the jurisdiction where the crime took place, that bail should not be set. Plus, due process does not mean bail is required; it simply means bail may not be denied absent a fair legal process, after which the suspect may be detained. That doesn’t undermine the presumption of innocence; the presumption will still apply at trial, which is what it’s intended for.


Traditionally, the first inquiry in bail questions is risk of flight: What conditions are necessary to assure the court that the accused will show up for trial and other court proceedings? When a person is a just-arrived illegal alien who is video-recorded committing a serious crime, he should be detained as a flight risk. He has no roots in the community – indeed, his roots are in another country.


Moreover, under federal law he should already be detained because he is illegally present, which gives him an even more powerful incentive to flee if released. But of course, New York is a so-called "sanctuary city," which does not recognize and refuses to assist in the enforcement of federal immigration laws.

Karl Rove reacts to migrants accused of beating cops released without bail: 'So wrong on so many levels'Video
Plainly, New York is a slave to woke progressivism. What passes for logic in that ideology holds that, because non-white defendants are prosecuted at higher rates, the system must be inherently racist – it couldn’t possibly be that other groups offend at higher rates (as every objective study of crime data and crime-victim reporting proves). In New York, then, it is routine to find high-flight-risk offenders released without conditions – and then to find that they flee, often after committing more crimes.

Outside of a terrorist attack, there is no offense that more patently illustrates a person’s incorrigible dangerousness than attacks on police officers when they are in the act of carrying out their duties to protect the community and enforce its laws.

The second inquiry in setting bail is dangerousness. Here, the Empire State truly stands out. Throughout the United States, if prosecutors establish that no combination of conditions can satisfy the court that, if released, the accused will not imperil the community at large, including witnesses in his case, the court may detain the defendant pending trial. That is federal law. It is also the law in every state … except New York.


Think about it. Outside of a terrorist attack, there is no offense that more patently illustrates a person’s incorrigible dangerousness than attacks on police officers when they are in the act of carrying out their duties to protect the community and enforce its laws. Suspects who willfully attack armed police officers are not going to be restrained by bail conditions. Everywhere else in the country, such defendants are detained.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE FOX NEWS OPINION

But not in New York. In New York, judges are forbidden from taking into account that an accused’s criminal history and/or the nature of the crime he is credibly accused of committing render him unfit for release on bail conditions.

Even with New York’s asinine bail laws, there was plenty of basis to seek detention for the gang of illegal aliens that viciously beat the two cops last week. But it takes a prosecutor to make the case. District attorney Alvin Bragg is a progressive Democrat who resists prosecutions that would anger progressives – he’ll happily indict Donald Trump on a preposterous false business records case (and stack enough counts that Trump faces a potential of over a century in prison); but don’t ask him to seek bail for illegal aliens who beat up cops.


Note: After the public outrage over the release of the first five suspects without bail conditions, Bragg’s office did manage to have bail set on two others who are now detained pending further proceedings. It can be done. The prosecutor just has to be willing to prosecute.

The first five illegal-alien cop-beaters, who pranced out of court flipping their middle fingers at New Yorkers, have reportedly fled the jurisdiction. Good luck ever holding them accountable.

The middle finger is a sort of universal language. But in New York, where prosecutors and many judges are elected, it has a special meaning: Hey, why do you people keep voting for this?