Author Topic: PanFa War; Supply Chain issues  (Read 4622 times)

Crafty_Dog

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« Last Edit: July 15, 2022, 01:13:43 AM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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Crafty_Dog

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Fire on Madeira
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2022, 07:06:46 AM »
https://michaelyon.locals.com/upost/1957664/another-supply-chain-fire-this-time-on-the-island-of-madeira

Edited to add:

"1. Independent Portuguese island, Madeira has allowed use of BTC"
« Last Edit: April 07, 2022, 06:36:00 PM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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Re: Russian uranium
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2022, 07:45:34 AM »

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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G M

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Re: MY: Screaming from the balconies in China
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2022, 03:45:01 PM »
second

https://michaelyon.locals.com/upost/1973155/slaves-scream-from-shanghai-prisons-their-apartments

My wife says the Shanghainese are signing "We are the world" in English at night as a form of protest.

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: Supply chain issues; PanFa War
« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2022, 08:30:50 PM »



Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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GPF: Russia increases export quotas for fertilizer
« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2022, 11:04:11 AM »
ore fertilizer. Russia increased export quotas for mineral fertilizer producers until May 31. The boost will add 231,000 metric tons of nitrogen fertilizers and 466,000 metric tons of complex fertilizers to the market. Meanwhile, Russia’s agriculture minister announced over the weekend that the government would release an estimated 500 billion rubles ($6 billion) in assistance for the agriculture sector this year to help with lending, seed production and transport.



Crafty_Dog

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Stratfor: Sub-Saharan Africa
« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2022, 02:12:39 PM »
Food Shortages Risk Destabilizing Sub-Saharan Africa's Fragile Governments
4 MIN READApr 19, 2022 | 18:27 GMT


In sub-Saharan Africa, a surge in global commodity prices, inflation and supply shortages — combined with major regional droughts — are increasing food insecurity, which will trigger unrest and could destabilize some governments. Prior to Russia's invasion of Ukraine in February, many Africans were already struggling to find affordable food due to the lingering global economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. But the ongoing war in Ukraine and the West's subsequent sanctions campaign against Moscow have only worsened food insecurity across countries in sub-Saharan Africa by exacerbating global inflation and creating more supply shortages. According to a recent U.N. report, 25 of the 69 countries that are currently seeing an increase in hunger due to disruptions in food, energy and finance systems are in Africa. Domestic inflation compounds the effects of global price hikes for basic food supplies like wheat, sorghum, rice, millet and yams, significantly reducing Africans' purchasing power. Environmental crises, meanwhile — increasing the ongoing droughts in the Western Sahel and the Horn of Africa — are also adding to agricultural shortages by reducing farmers' crop yields, which then further increase the prices of scarce commodities.

The U.N. humanitarian office warned that Kenya and countries in the Horn of Africa (including Somalia, Eritrea, Ethiopia and Djibouti) are facing the worst drought in 40 years, leaving 29 million people in affected areas at severe risk of famine.

The World Food Program predicts that nearly 22 million Sudanese will face hunger this year, in part due to the fact that in previous years, Sudan imported 35% of its wheat supplies from Russia and Ukraine.

The price of a gallon of oil in Ghana's Agbogbloshie market, one of the busiest trading hubs in the country, rose from 105 Ghana cedis (about $13) in August 2021 to 400 cedis (around $52) in April 2022.

Nearly 90% of Kenya's open water sources have dried up, leading to a 70% drop in crop production that is causing acute hunger for 3.5 million people in the country.

Food insecurity has historically been a key driver in political instability in Africa, a trend that the current economic crisis could exacerbate. Multiple factors have historically led to social resistance to central governments in Africa, like high unemployment, economic inequality, political repression and armed conflict. Severe hunger, however, is often a leading cause of extreme political volatility. Indeed, many of those who participated in recent anti-government protests in Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and Sudan cited hunger and/or an inability to feed their families as a key reason for taking to the streets.

In 2018, protests over food and fuel prices in Sudan evolved into the political revolution that ultimately ousted the country's long-time authoritarian leader Omar al-Bashir and paved the way for a transitional government.

Food insecurity and other economic grievances in Kenya helped fuel the massive wave of violence following the country's 2007 election, during which nearly 1,300 people reportedly died.

In January, a military coup in Burkina Faso ousted former President Roch Marc Christian Kabore. In the weeks leading up to the coup, hundreds of protesters took to the streets nationwide to demand economic relief after price increases resulted in widespread hunger, as well as government accountability for the deteriorating security situation in the country's north.

Riots over food insecurity will risk compounding unrest that could destabilize and, in extreme cases, even topple fragile regimes in sub-Saharan Africa. As food staples become increasingly expensive and harder to find, demonstrations demanding relief are likely to intensify over the next few months across sub-Saharan Africa. The risk of extreme political volatility will be highest in countries that have recently witnessed military coups and/or are battling ongoing insurgencies — including Burkina Faso, the Central African Republic, Ethiopia, Mali, Niger, Somalia and Sudan. Protests against the price of food supplies or lack of access to basic products have the potential to escalate into violence and looting, further undermining the stability of the already fragile governments in these countries. If security forces respond by cracking down on protesters (as they have most recently done in Sudan), a broader movement against the government in question could gain momentum. In countries with less vulnerable central governments (such as Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, Ghana and South Africa), food insecurity will still likely result in unrest that could trigger security crackdowns, business disruptions and political uncertainty. Nigeria and Kenya are at particular risk of these factors, as they are both approaching general elections.



G M

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They have plans
« Reply #26 on: April 19, 2022, 08:02:43 PM »
https://nationalfile.com/wef-advisor-yuval-harari-ponders-how-world-will-deal-with-useless-people/

The ClotShot was one way for a "soft kill".

Starvation and war are next.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Supply chain issues; PanFa War
« Reply #27 on: April 19, 2022, 08:17:41 PM »
Fascinating point, but somehow this is not the thread for it.  Perhaps the Intelligence thread?

G M

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Re: Supply chain issues; PanFa War
« Reply #28 on: April 19, 2022, 08:34:32 PM »
Fascinating point, but somehow this is not the thread for it.  Perhaps the Intelligence thread?

Maybe we need a "Great Reset" thread.

G M

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DougMacG

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Re: Supply chain issues; PanFa War
« Reply #30 on: April 20, 2022, 08:54:45 AM »
"The ClotShot was one way for a "soft kill"."

One problem with the intentional theory is the upside down motive.  A bad vax kills the government compliant people.  Don't they want exactly the opposite?

G M

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Re: Supply chain issues; PanFa War
« Reply #31 on: April 20, 2022, 09:51:46 AM »
"The ClotShot was one way for a "soft kill"."

One problem with the intentional theory is the upside down motive.  A bad vax kills the government compliant people.  Don't they want exactly the opposite?

The compliant are just the low hanging fruit. That’s what the starvation and war is for. If you want your cyberdollars for your allotment of gruel and insect paste, better get vaxxed and turn in your guns.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Supply chain issues; PanFa War
« Reply #32 on: April 22, 2022, 02:31:16 AM »
https://michaelyon.locals.com/upost/2027562/what-do-you-think

BTW, Tucker noted this phenomenon last night.

G M

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Countdown
« Reply #33 on: April 23, 2022, 07:16:09 AM »
https://www.zerohedge.com/commodities/rockefeller-foundation-president-starts-countdown-until-all-hell-breaks-loose

"The ClotShot was one way for a "soft kill"."

One problem with the intentional theory is the upside down motive.  A bad vax kills the government compliant people.  Don't they want exactly the opposite?

The compliant are just the low hanging fruit. That’s what the starvation and war is for. If you want your cyberdollars for your allotment of gruel and insect paste, better get vaxxed and turn in your guns.


Crafty_Dog

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Re: Supply chain issues; PanFa War
« Reply #35 on: April 23, 2022, 12:04:32 PM »
Too bad the click bait ads accompanying the article are there-- makes it hard to share , , ,

G M

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Re: Supply chain issues; PanFa War
« Reply #36 on: April 23, 2022, 12:05:54 PM »
Too bad the click bait ads accompanying the article are there-- makes it hard to share , , ,

I know, very irritating!

Crafty_Dog

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China's economic suicide
« Reply #37 on: April 23, 2022, 04:16:01 PM »
China’s Economic Suicide: ‘Zero COVID’
Antonio Graceffo
Antonio Graceffo
 April 22, 2022 Updated: April 22, 2022biggersmaller Print


Chinese leader Xi Jinping has been adamant that he will maintain his “zero-COVID” policy even as it destroys China’s economy.

By the first week of April, approximately 75 percent of China’s 100 largest cities, which account for over half of the GDP, have imposed COVID-19 restrictions. Shanghai’s draconian lockdown was the most widely publicized. Jilin, a major agricultural and commercial center, was also subjected to harsh restrictions. In March, the manufacturing city of Shenzhen saw a suspension of nearly all economic activity for a week.

With school closures and travel restrictions being implemented in Guangdong, home to tens of millions of people, another lockdown with dire implications for international trade may be on the horizon.

Going into 2022, the central government had already set the lowest GDP growth target in decades, which was 5.5 percent. But now, the Ukraine war and the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) adherence to a “zero-COVID” policy are slowing the economy even further.

The Caixin/Markit services purchasing managers’ index (PMI), a measure of general economic activity, dropped from 50.2 in February to 42 in March. A Caixin index of less than 50 means that the economy is contracting.

To put the economic damage of the Shanghai lockdown into perspective, this financial hub generates 3.8 percent of the country’s GDP and 10.4 percent of its trade. More than 800 hundred multinational firms have regional or country headquarters in Shanghai, and 70,000 foreign-owned businesses are located there.

Shanghai’s seaport is the largest in the world, with a volume four times that of the Port of Los Angeles, and it accounts for 16.7 percent of China’s shipping.

As a result of COVID measures, export container costs in Shanghai are five times higher and air freight rates are double what they were before the pandemic. Lockdowns are also causing port congestion.

As of April 11, the number of container ships waiting off the coast of Shanghai had increased by 15 percent since March. A shortage of port workers is delaying the processing of documents necessary for unloading, and trucks are unable to transport goods to the processing mills. Consequently, port usage has seen its first contraction since 2020.

Across the country, restrictions on truckers—such as mass testing and the need to show negative COVID results at multiple checkpoints—are causing log jams, shortages, and production stoppages.

During the first week of April, freight traffic in China dropped by about 25 percent. The number of passenger trains is down to 30 percent. Flight ticket prices have also declined steeply as fewer people are able to travel. The International Energy Agency (IEA) had expected to see China’s jet fuel consumption grow by 10,000 barrels per day; however, jet fuel demand is expected to fall by 3.5 percent compared to last year.

Metal producers have cut production due to an inability to ship raw materials or finished products. A Shanghai Metals Market survey found that 6 of 12 copper rod plants in Shanghai’s neighboring provinces had halted or planned to halt output. Consequently, the purchase of raw materials is declining. In March, iron ore that is used in steelmaking and in construction was down 14.5 percent.

With transportation, construction, and manufacturing restricted, crude imports dropped by 14 percent year on year, and natural gas imports reached a low not seen since 2020.

Technology companies were already hampered by a shortage of raw materials and regulatory crackdown. As the extreme lockdowns came, many firms terminated production. Among them were Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corp., Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., and iPhone maker Foxconn Technology Group. As of April 13, 30 Taiwanese companies, including Pegatron Corp. and Macbook maker Quanta Computer Inc., had ceased operations.

Other tech companies have adopted a closed-bubble system for employees. This may allow them to restart manufacturing, but they will still be plagued by the problems of shipping, transportation, and port congestion.

Compared to figures seen in February, passenger car sales in March decreased by 10.9 percent. Shanghai’s Tesla factory has been closed since March 28, while Volkswagen AG and Chinese EV maker Nio Inc. suspended production in April. Auto parts maker Robert Bosch GmbH (commonly known as Bosch) also closed two of its factories in April.


Domestic sales of excavators, a proxy measure for the health of the construction sector, decreased by nearly 64 percent in March from last year.

Home sales dropped 53 percent last month from a year ago.

While residents under lockdown scramble to find food, the price of fresh vegetables has risen more than 17 percent nationwide. The National Bureau of Statistics’ data showed that farmers in the northeast, where much of China’s food comes from, were prevented by COVID restrictions from plowing their fields and sowing seeds. This can only add to food inflation and shortages in the coming year.

Consumer confidence and spending are down, with Bloomberg estimating that retail sales declined by 3 percent in March compared to 2021. While Beijing plans to inject economic stimulus, its effectiveness is limited if people are unwilling to spend.

Goldman Sachs is predicting a mere 4.5 percent GDP growth this year, but that number presumes that lockdowns will end at some point.

Xi remains adamant that he will stick to the zero-COVID policy and make it the top priority. All provinces have been told to prepare quarantine camps as lockdowns may be extended.


Impact on the US
China’s imports were down .1 percent in March, which is considered a lagging indicator. This means that if imports are down now, exports will be down later. A decline in imports is having direct impact on China’s trading partners.

U.S. exports to China have already fallen by 11.6 percent. Meanwhile, for all of the talk over the past two years about diversifying supply chains, many U.S. companies are still dependent on China. For this reason, as Chinese exports decrease, the United States experiences supply chain disruption.

China’s March producer price index is currently up 8.3 percent. Factory gate inflation and the cost of goods at the factory are expected to rise even further, driving up the cost of imported consumer goods in the United States.

Inflation in the United States already stands at a 40-year high, and the situation in China will just make things worse.

Views expressed in this article are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Epoch Times.








Crafty_Dog

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