Author Topic: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters  (Read 629 times)

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #50 on: January 18, 2023, 06:50:08 AM »
In an earlier post, there was something about "their story beginning in the middle".  Here it would seem we begin to peel back a layer of the onion.

WHY was DOJ looking into this to begin with?


DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 16773
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #52 on: January 18, 2023, 01:25:44 PM »
In an earlier post, there was something about "their story beginning in the middle".  Here it would seem we begin to peel back a layer of the onion.

WHY was DOJ looking into this to begin with?

What are you thinking here?

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #53 on: January 18, 2023, 03:29:44 PM »
If I have this right, DOJ/FBI were the impetus for the search and oddly they allowed the President's lawyers to conduct the search!  Without the FBI agents even being present! 

A cynical person might view this as:

a) an invitation to destroy any evidence; or

b) a prompting to find evidence so as to undermine Biden so he can't run again,

c) Could the timeline of Hunter's appearances in the house and/or Penn Biden Center play a role here?

Yes, the two theories push in opposite directions but if I have it right, neither is contradicted by the facts as we now know and perceive them.   

Perhaps a bigger question is WHY/WHAT TRIGGERED THE DOJ/FBI TO WANT TO CONDUCT THE SEARCH?

« Last Edit: January 18, 2023, 03:38:08 PM by Crafty_Dog »


Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #55 on: January 18, 2023, 04:17:11 PM »
third

BIDEN GETS THE HILLARY TREATMENT… FBI LETS HIM SORT THROUGH GOV’T DOCUMENTS AND TURN OVER WHATEVER HE FEELS LIKE… WSJ: Justice Department Considered but Rejected Role in Biden Documents Search

WASHINGTON—The Justice Department considered having FBI agents monitor a search by President Biden’s lawyers for classified documents at his homes but decided against it, both to avoid complicating later stages of the investigation and because Mr. Biden’s attorneys had quickly turned over a first batch and were cooperating, according to people familiar with the matter.

After Mr. Biden’s lawyers discovered documents marked as classified dating from his term as vice president at an office he used at a Washington-based think tank on Nov. 2, the Justice Department opened an inquiry into why and how they got there. Mr. Biden’s legal team prepared to search his other properties for any similar documents, and discussed with the Justice Department the prospect of having FBI agents present while Mr. Biden’s lawyers conducted the additional searches.

Instead, the two sides agreed that Mr. Biden’s personal attorneys would inspect the homes, notify the Justice Department as soon as they identified any other potentially classified records, and arrange for law-enforcement authorities to take them.

 

JONATHAN TURLEY: The Wall Street Journal is reporting that the DOJ declined to have the FBI conduct searches and instead allowed uncleared private counsel to do so. If true, it is a level of accommodation that would make a Kardashian blush.

… Why would any investigator not want to conduct a search? The alternative was to allow uncleared, unknown counsel to sort through potential classified material. There is no legal or logical reason why the DOJ would prefer private counsel to do such a search.

…It also undermines the Justice Department’s position in both cases. This is the department threatening criminal charges over mishandling of classified material. Yet, WSJ is reporting that it opted for the least secure method of searching for additional documents…

…The preference to use uncleared lawyers violates core policies in the handling of potentially classified material. The DOJ went along with a bizarre “look but don’t read” approach in the use of uncleared persons after finding highly classified material.

 

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #56 on: January 18, 2023, 05:07:37 PM »
fourth

Why Have the Biden Papers Surfaced, and to What End?
Benjamin WeingartenBenjamin Weingarten January 16, 2023 Updated: January 16, 2023biggersmaller Print

0:00
12:54



1

Commentary

On the first business day after Republicans got their House in order, word came that the president they were planning to probe was being probed by the Deep State they too were planning to probe.

In fact, as House Republicans were readying a Church-style committee to investigate the weaponization of the FBI and DOJ, illustrated by acts such as the unprecedented raid of the personal residence of former president Donald Trump over his removal and retention of classified documents, these agencies were pursuing the current president, Joe Biden, on similar grounds.

Now, amid revelations the Biden Papers turned up not just at the Penn Biden Center, but in President Biden’s Delaware garage, and amid public outrage over a seeming double standard in the Justice Department’s relentless pursuit of Trump, and deferential treatment towards Biden regarding classified document handling, Attorney General Merrick Garland has appointed a special counsel to Biden’s case.

With dueling special prosecutors probing the former and current presidents over their removal and retention of files upon their exits from office—Trump from the presidency, which gave him a right to declassify that he maintains he exercised, and Biden from a vice presidency that gave him no such authority—Americans will be fixated on how the DOJ disposes of these cases, and the impact on the 2024 presidential election.

As significant as these matters are, one question looms over them: Why have the Biden Papers surfaced, and to what end?

There are no coincidences in politics. Beyond the conspicuous timing of the Biden Paper leaks, and the Justice Department’s action, are we to believe that six years after Joe Biden left the vice presidency, his lawyers just happened to stumble upon classified documents he took with him, implicating Biden in the same conduct used to pursue his predecessor and opponent for the Oval Office in 2024? Looking further into the timing, actors involved, and how they might benefit from the Biden Papers leads us to several plausible explanations for what’s going on.

Theory 1: Joe Biden is no longer useful to Democrats and/or the Deep State, and the Biden Papers can be used to purge or minimally control him. There’s no shortage of motives for the Democratic Party and/or Deep State to hoist Biden on his own “mishandling of classified materials” petard, leveraging the Biden Papers to induce him to step down, or, at a minimum, stand down for the 2024 election.

For Democrats, the rationale for discarding Biden is straightforward: The president has advanced the radical progressive agenda demanded of him, but that agenda may advance no further with the House lost, Biden is past his “sell by” date, and the Party wants to reset with a fresh figurehead.

Under this theory, the timing of the fishy finding of the Biden Papers in November 2022 was perfect—landing squarely in the period when the DOJ would claim it was prohibited from disclosing politically sensitive investigations. By keeping a lid on the story until January 2023, the politically damaging revelations couldn’t impact the midterm elections, nor derail the Democrat agenda while the Party still controlled Congress.

The post-midterm timing could also prove relevant for another reason. While a president may only be elected for two terms, under the Constitution’s 22nd Amendment, one could serve as president for up to ten years by replacing a president for the last two years of his term, and then winning two presidential elections. Once the clock begins ticking on Biden’s third year in just a few short days, were he to step down or be removed, Vice President Kamala Harris could assume the office and reign for a decade.

However improbable the prospect of VP Harris getting elected twice might be, it isn’t impossible. Remember, Democrat power brokers, presumably led by Barack Obama, thought well enough of Harris to install her as Biden’s VP knowing she might well replace the declining now-octogenarian. And it’s worth noting that in recent weeks, some in the media have seemingly been straining to rehabilitate Harris, while the president’s most visible presence came at a Southern border that stands as a symbol of his administration’s failures—and for which Harris was supposed to bear responsibility. Who a potential President Harris might nominate as a vice president, and how that process might play out alone, could create further political opportunities for Democrats to exploit.

At a minimum, with the Biden Papers hanging over Joe’s head, the Democratic Party could use the probe to pressure him out of running in 2024, particularly with more political carnage perhaps to ensue under oversight onslaught from House Republicans. Down the road, Democrats could argue no person facing federal investigation for his handling of classified documents should run for the president, using it to torpedo Joe and try to claim a “moral high ground” to undermine Trump, knowing he would never bow out.

As for the Deep State, it’s harder to pinpoint specifically why it might wish to see Biden out of power. It is telling, however, that the national security apparatus and Biden White House mouthpieces have repeatedly walked back the president’s proclamations on a whole slew of critical matters of national security and foreign policy. If nothing else, as for the Democrats, this probe provides the Deep State leverage over Biden.

Now, why threaten the president with political and legal liability over his handling of classified documents of all things? Set aside for a moment the significant relevance given the ongoing Trump probe. Recall that as Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer told Trump, the intelligence community can get you “six ways from Sunday.” This is to say, the feds could unleash a barrage of far more damaging information on Biden and his relatives to the public—rooted in the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop alone—not only humiliating the family but putting its members in far graver potential legal peril.

Put yourself in Biden’s shoes. Would you rather cry uncle over relatively less serious charges of having mishandled classified documents, or risk getting hit with bigger bombshells, leading to potential impeachment—impeachment Democrats might wish to goad Republicans into, thinking it will backfire on them going into 2024—possible removal, charges once out of office, and trouble for your family?

On that note, let’s not forget, as the New York Times reminded readers just as the Biden Papers saga was starting to unfold, that Hunter Biden himself is still under investigation and potentially facing charges. Could it be that there’s a quid pro Joe—that if the president walks away now, authorities will spare his son?

Theory 2: The Justice Department and FBI are using the Biden Papers to protect themselves and grow their power. It’s always a safe assumption that government bureaucracies act first and foremost in their own perceived self-interest. For the Justice Department and FBI in particular, the Biden Papers can be manipulated for ends unrelated to sidelining Joe Biden. In fact, if we have learned one thing in recent years, it’s that the national security and law enforcement agencies operate as if they’re superior to commanders-in-chief.

That said, there’s no Deep State without public funding for it, and that funding in part requires political support. It’s perhaps unlikely the Republican House will attempt to use the power of the purse as leverage to rein in the Deep State, but at minimum, the public image of the likes of the FBI and DOJ is under threat with the just-established House Judiciary subcommittee on the Weaponization of the Federal Government. So, from the perspective of the Deep State, what better way to blunt the force of a committee claiming weaponization against conservatives than to, two days after that subcommittee comes into being, announce a special counsel probe of the current president over similar conduct to that which a special counsel was already probing the prior Republican president?

AG Garland made the intended optics quite clear in announcing that the appointment of a special counsel to probe the Biden Papers “underscores for the public the Department’s commitment to both independence and accountability in particularly sensitive matters, and to making decisions indisputably guided only by the facts and the law.”

However many times AG Garland returns to this refrain, of course, it doesn’t make it true. The entirety of his DOJ’s record in targeting Wrongthinkers on everything from Jan. 6 and election integrity, to draconian public school lockdowns and abortion, gives lie to the narrative. The disingenuousness is even reflected in AG Garland’s selection of a special counsel who, though presented as a Republican, a la Robert Mueller, has longtime ties to senior leaders in the DOJ/FBI who have led its politicization and weaponization—conduct he allegedly supported in at least one notable instance.

The appointment of a special counsel in a bid to shield the Justice Department from the House Weaponization subcommittee, and perhaps divert attention from the subcommittee’s findings of Deep State depredations, itself can be seen as political. But the political nature of the Biden Papers probe goes deeper than that.

By selecting a special counsel now for Trump and Biden, the FBI and DOJ likely believe they have now hived off these two cases from the prying eyes of House Republicans and any other inquiring minds. They will stonewall requests for documents and testimony remotely touching on either of the two probes. Just how reckless was Joe Biden with classified documents, what did those documents really consist of, and what else might the FBI and DOJ unearth as they lock down every location tied to him? We may never know.

The special counsel also gives the DOJ optionality. For the sake of argument, assume that the Justice Department recognizes its case against Trump on the mishandling of classified materials, given precedent, and on the merits, is weak. Assume that its case against Biden is relatively stronger, particularly given his lack of declassification authority. How best to “save face?” Punt the pretextual charges against Trump, find no wrongdoing in Biden’s case too as a matter of “fairness,” but ultimately indict Trump on other matters such as obstruction, or those pertaining to the 2020 election. In this way, the Justice Department will claim it acted fairly and independently while still achieving its goal of charging and perhaps convicting Trump.

Creating these dueling special counsels also provides the Deep State optionality of a kind we have seen before—now having leverage over two leading candidates for the presidency in 2024. Remember that in 2016, while authorities were relentlessly pursuing Trump over purported Russian collusion, at the same time it was engaged in a sham probe of Hillary Clinton over her emails. After exonerating Clinton, in the waning days of the election, the FBI Director James Comey, in effect, hedged his—and the agencies’—bets by re-raising the matter of Hillary’s emails based on the bureau’s review of those found on former Congressman Anthony Weiner’s laptop. As with their kid gloves treatment of Clinton, the FBI and DOJ have served as a sword and shield for Biden to this point, but by appointing a special counsel to him, they are, in effect, hedging once again in investigating Trump and Biden.

Theory 3: The Biden Papers aim to distract us from a bigger scandal. This supposition speaks for itself. If Americans are focusing on the Biden Papers, what other scandals or disasters of the Biden administration, the Democrats, or the Deep State are we the people not focusing on?

That it isn’t only reasonable but prudent, based on what we’ve witnessed in recent years, to consider the theories presented herein is a beyond sad commentary about the state of our republic and the power and politicization of our Deep State.

We’re left with one question: If Joe Biden is in effect deep-sixed by that Deep State, will he get behind the House Republicans’ New Church Committee?

Views expressed in this article are the opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Epoch Times.

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
Who Ordered the Review of Papers at Penn-Biden?
« Reply #57 on: January 19, 2023, 02:48:36 PM »
https://www.nationalreview.com/the-morning-jolt/who-ordered-the-review-of-papers-at-the-penn-biden-center/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MJ_20230119&utm_term=Jolt-Smart

By JIM GERAGHTY
January 19, 2023 8:33 AM
On the menu today: One of the reasons that White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre keeps getting hit with questions about the classified documents found in Biden’s home and private office is due to her vague explanation of how and why they were discovered there. In 2018, former vice president Biden announced the creation of the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement in Washington, D.C., the second new university-affiliated institution named after him in a year. And yet, by November 2022, the Biden team was preparing to “vacate office space” at the Penn Biden Center. Why? What prompted that move? And who decided that one of Biden’s personal lawyers should go through his old papers at that time?

The Penn Biden Center Mystery

Why was one of President Biden’s personal lawyers going through his papers at the Penn Biden Center in November? Jonathan Turley cracks, “It seems a fairly pricey moving crew.”

Richard Sauber, special counsel to President Biden, said last Monday that “The documents were discovered when the president’s personal attorneys were packing files housed in a locked closet to prepare to vacate office space at the” Penn Biden Center.

But that explanation only raises more questions. Why were Biden’s closest and most trusted aides — covered by attorney-client privilege — preparing to vacate office space at a center named after him? Who decided that the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement was not a good place to store documents from Biden’s time as vice president, and why?

The Penn Biden Center officially opened its doors on February 8, 2018. It’s not a remote campus for the University of Pennsylvania, although sometimes small groups of UPenn students traveled down to Washington for meetings and guest speakers.

TOP STORIES
DeSantis: AP African-American Studies Program, as Written, Violates Florida Law
GOP Representative Greg Steube ‘Sustained Several Injuries’ in Accident at Home
San Francisco’s Insane ‘Reparations’ Program
Facebook, Instagram Lift Breast Ban — But Only for Trans, Nonbinary Users
The Virginia Schools Scandal
Supreme Court Refuses to Block New York Gun-Control Law
As president, Biden described himself as “a full professor at the University of Pennsylvania,” but that isn’t an accurate label. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported in 2019 that, “The former vice president collected $371,159 in 2017 plus $540,484 in 2018 and early 2019 for a vaguely defined role that involved no regular classes and around a dozen public appearances on campus, mostly in big, ticketed events.” Note the words “on campus,” meaning that while the Penn Biden Center would intermittently host once-a-week class sessions, it wasn’t primarily used for classes or teaching.

The Penn Biden Center also wasn’t a vice-presidential library, although clearly Biden stored some of his papers there. Biden himself had a sizable office at the center, but CNN reported that, “It wouldn’t be uncommon to be told during a visit that Biden himself didn’t spend much time there,” citing a source familiar with the office and its layout.

In fact, the Penn Biden Center was the second major university center named after himself that Biden had founded in about a year. In 2017, the former vice president unveiled the Biden Institute at the University of Delaware’s Joseph R. Biden, Jr. School of Public Policy and Administration. But the Penn Biden Center offered a much more glamorous and cosmopolitan home base for the former vice president and his staffers than Newark, Del.

The Penn Biden Center is located at 101 Constitution Avenue, an office building that touts itself as “the front seat to power” and boasts that it is “the closest commercial office building to the U.S. Capitol.” A university press release noted that, “To Mr. Biden’s particular joy, it is only a few blocks from the Amtrak hub, Union Station.”

As you would imagine, leasing office space in that building costs a pretty penny. Rand Construction and Jacobs designed and developed the 13,800 square foot space. Right now, leases in the building are currently going for $40 per square foot per year, so the lease for a space the size of the Biden Center costs about $552,000 per year.

When Biden opened the center, he described its mission as cutting through the clutter:

At a time when there seems to be so much clutter and misinformation involving global issues, it’s Biden’s hope to “cut through it,” he said, and to do so by reaching out and working with Penn’s brilliant minds. He wants to, from his perspective, provide a clear sense of what’s at stake, and what the U.S. must do to sustain growth, security, and leadership in the world.

“I know that sounds grandiose, but that’s literally what we are trying to do with this center,” he said.

“Cutting through the clutter” apparently involved operating like any one of the other small think tanks in Washington, D.C., by issuing reports, cosponsoring programs, and hosting events.

The center launched various projects, including the Refugee Admissions Project, which generated a report calling for a dramatic increase in the number of refugees permitted to resettle in the U.S., and the Democracy Project, which commissioned a national survey in partnership with Freedom House and the George W. Bush Institute. The center also cosponsored the Kakehashi Project, a program that brings graduate and undergraduate students to Japan for a week of cultural exchange. The center’s “leaders dialogue” featured only two events, a Biden discussion with Andrea Mitchell of NBC News, and another discussion with Sir Nick Clegg, the former U.K. deputy prime minister.

The center also became the employer for the future Biden administration-in-waiting; among the employees were future Secretary of State Antony Blinken, White House counselor Steven Richetti, and at least eight others who would go on to serve in the administration.

The Biden Institute at the University of Delaware was one of the other big employers of future administration officials. The initial Biden Institute staff featured current White House senior adviser Mike Donilon; Don Graves, the deputy secretary of the Department of Commerce; Ben Harris, the assistant secretary for economic policy at the Treasury Department; Stefanie Feldman, a deputy assistant to President Biden at the White House; Sophia Sokolowski, the director of intergovernmental affairs in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative; and Catherine McLaughlin, whom Biden nominated to the AmeriCorps Board of Directors.

The America First Legal Foundation filed an IRS complaint this week, contending that the Penn Biden Center “functioned as a vehicle for Penn to raise and funnel large amounts of Chinese Communist money to Joe Biden and his political cronies.”

The University of Pennsylvania has a $4 billion per year operating budget, and more than $1 billion of its revenues come from federal grants. Thus, it wouldn’t be surprising if UPenn determined it needed a permanent base in the nation’s capital to help maintain working relationships with congressional appropriators, as well as grant-writing institutions such as the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and the Department of Defense.

CNN’s coverage of the Biden document controversy mentions this curious detail:

The documents were discovered in November by the president’s personal attorneys when they were packing files housed in a locked closet as they prepared to vacate the office, the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement, according to Biden’s White House lawyer. They were preparing to vacate the space less than five years after Biden had cut the ribbon to unveil it. [Emphasis added.]

The center opened in February 2018, and yet Biden’s team was vacating the space by November 2022. What happened? Back in November 2020, the university told the Inquirer, “The center was always intended to continue even after Biden moved on.”

The desire to go through boxes of old documents before moving them indicates some interruption of the usual bureaucratic inertia. Nobody goes through boxes of old government papers for fun; someone was looking for something. In fact, CNN reported, apparently these boxes had moved from one office to another several times, without anyone going through them and noticing the classified papers:

Many of the boxes of personal items — not deemed covered by the records requirements to submit to the National Archives — were transported from the vice president’s office to a temporary facility about one block away from the White House, run by the General Services Administration. From there, they went to another temporary office before eventually being moved to the offices of the Penn Biden Center.

That CNN report also offered a few more details:

It was a manilla folder marked “VP personal” that contained one of the classified documents that was first discovered last November by the Biden attorney, setting off the chain of events, according to one person familiar with the find.

Among the items from Biden’s time as vice president are 10 classified documents including U.S. intelligence memorandums and briefing materials that covered topics including Ukraine, Iran and the United Kingdom.

Biden’s lawyer felt comfortable opening a manilla folder labeled “VP personal.” That sounds like a thorough review of everything in those boxes, much more than a routine moving of boxes from one storage closet to another. What was Biden’s lawyer looking for? What did he expect to find?

Perhaps the most intriguing possibility in all this was whether Biden’s lawyer was specifically looking for classified information that had been left over from Biden’s time as vice president. After all, about a month or so earlier, Biden appeared on 60 Minutes and asked, with stern disapproval, how anyone could possibly be so irresponsible as to take classified information out of a government facility. Did someone on Biden’s team belatedly realize that Biden or one of his staffers may have done the same?

By the way, notice how Biden’s initial answer on the document controversy makes it sound like his office was at the main university, then makes it sound like it’s in the U.S. Capitol Building, and then again insists that he was a professor: “When my lawyers were clearing out my office at the University of Pennsylvania, they set up an office for me — a secure office in the Capitol, when I — the four years after being Vice President, I was a professor at Penn.”

The Penn Biden Center is quieter these days. The last tweet from the center was in May 2022.

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
AMcC: Biden's DOJ was grossly negligent
« Reply #58 on: January 20, 2023, 07:07:27 AM »
Biden’s DOJ Was Grossly Negligent in Handling Classified-Document Searches

A.G. Merrick Garland announces that he is appointing a special counsel to investigate President Biden's handling of classified documents in Washington, D.C., January 12, 2023.(Leah Millis/Reuters)
By ANDREW C. MCCARTHY
January 19, 2023 11:52 AM

The DOJ decided Biden aides without security clearances, rather than the FBI, should conduct searches virtually certain to turn up classified documents.

If only we could indict the Department of Justice for felony mishandling of classified documents.

Attorney General Merrick Garland and his accomplices at the FBI appear to deserve it, at least if an eye-popping Wall Street Journal report published Tuesday has it right. The report harpoons a dubious defense President Biden’s apologists have floated: the notion that Biden did not know about the classified documents he was illegally retaining, notwithstanding that he — not an aide, not a lawyer, but he himself — is the common denominator tying together the multiple locations where classified intelligence has been found (his office, his homes, his garage, his library).

The Journal reports that the Biden team decided to have aides who did not have security clearances search the president’s private residences for additional classified documents after the first batch was found. Perhaps even worse, the Biden Justice Department declined to have the FBI present and overseeing these searches, even though it had abundant reason to know more secret intelligence would be found, as well as a duty to ensure that the bureau both preserved evidence and protected national security.

Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information

According to various reports, the first batch of classified documents was found on November 2 at Biden’s office in the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement in Washington. Garland has acknowledged that Biden’s private office was not an authorized location for retention of such intelligence (and nor were the locations in his private residences, where other classified intelligence was later found).

The substance of the first batch has been described only vaguely. The documents apparently trace to the Obama administration, in the period from 2013 to 2016, which is to say they’re records Biden had lawful access to when he was vice president. In that position, he was given significant foreign-policy responsibilities, about which he wrote extensively in a memoir that he seems to have produced while retaining the documents upon leaving office. It comes as no surprise, then, that some of the documents reportedly relate to Iran, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom.

First, note that vice presidents are typically permitted to retain their security clearances upon leaving office. Biden, however, had no authority to remove and retain classified information in unauthorized places, nor to transmit or otherwise expose that information to unauthorized people.


Second, some of the documents found in Biden’s office are said to be very highly classified — specifically, at the Top-Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information (TS/SCI) level. Under federal rules, intelligence is designated top secret — the highest of the three classification categories — only if its unauthorized disclosure “reasonably could be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to national security.” Beyond that, the SCI designation (which is common to top-secret intelligence) is triggered when the information at issue could compromise deep-cover intelligence sources and/or highly sensitive methods of gathering intelligence that the government needs to keep under wraps.

This has obvious relevance: We’re talking about a potentially catastrophic mishandling of classified information. But let’s consider the less obvious relevance.

Biden apologists have stressed from the start that the president’s private attorneys immediately self-reported their November 2 discovery of classified information. As we’ll see, that’s not quite accurate — they reported it to the Biden White House, and neither they nor the White House reported it to law enforcement. But put that aside for now. The issue is: Why did they self-report? Was it really that they’re just upright people?

Well, documents graded TS/SCI are unusual in that, because of their gravity, U.S. intelligence agencies make an effort to keep track of exactly which officials are given access to such documents and whether they are returned to government-secured safekeeping — think of checking out a book from the library, if you were only allowed to read it in a secure setting. To be sure, Biden should get credit for his aides’ doing the right thing and reporting the violation, rather than destroying evidence of it. Remember, though, they were also undoubtedly aware — especially after Biden’s lawyers consulted with White House officials — that there could be government records showing that Biden had been given these documents and failed to return them. Of course, we can and should wonder why no one in our $67 billion per annum Intelligence Community noticed until recently that Biden still had Obama-era TS/SCI documents; still, the possibility that such records exist would have provided incentive to report the discovery of the documents.

(As for the vast run of intelligence classified below the TS/SCI level, maddeningly, our government does not keep track of it — even in a technologically advanced era when a system for doing so is easy to imagine. This is because far too much information is classified, and a staggering 4.2 million people have been given security clearances, including 1.3 million with top-secret clearances.)

Biden Aides Did Not Notify Law Enforcement

With that as background, let’s move on to the discovery of the documents.

President Biden’s family is embroiled in a controversy involving the peddling of his influence to rake in millions of dollars in foreign money, particularly from Chinese “partners.” His Penn Biden Center was established after tens of millions of dollars in Chinese-sourced funds poured into the University of Pennsylvania. Did concern about such matters induce Biden to have his lawyers, rather than low-level aides, pack up his office? Why, for that matter, did he decide to pack the place up two years into his presidency? We don’t know.

What we have been told is that one of the president’s private lawyers, Patrick Moore, found the documents. The claim from Biden’s team is that there was a “small amount” of them — maybe ten, maybe a dozen. (A precise number has not been provided.) Moore did not report to the Justice Department or the FBI that the Biden team had found classified documents illegally stored in an unauthorized location. Rather, he notified the Biden White House.

We have not been told which Biden officials were involved in deliberations over what to do at that point. The administration’s point-man for providing sketchy explanations appears to be Richard Sauber, a lawyer the president recruited to the White House Counsel’s Office primarily to navigate what the administration expects will be an investigative onslaught by House Republicans. Sauber has indicated that the White House decided to notify the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) — again, not the Justice Department or the FBI.

Thus, it was not FBI agents who picked up the documents after their discovery; it was officials of NARA, a self-proclaimed “independent” agency — though it’s an executive agency, and one that is already helping the Biden administration stonewall congressional Republicans. Federal law-enforcement agencies did not learn about the discovery of the highly classified information illegally retained in Biden’s private office until the following day, November 4 — i.e., four days before the midterm elections. And this notification to DOJ came not from Biden’s lawyers or the Biden White House, but from NARA’s inspector general.

Given that it is a felony punishable by ten years’ imprisonment (under Section 793(f) of the federal penal code) for an official entrusted with access to national-defense information, such as Biden, to be grossly negligent in mishandling it (e.g., to remove it from government custody, to retain it in an unauthorized place, or to cause its transmission or exposure to unauthorized persons), the Justice Department naturally opened an investigation. DOJ appears to have soft-pedaled this probe as a “preliminary inquiry” or an “assessment,” rather than a full-blown criminal investigation. That, no doubt, is because the main suspect is the sitting president — the chief executive and thus the superior of those who are “investigating” him.

The FBI is said to have opened its inquiry on November 9. Neither the White House nor the Justice Department has explained why, having received evidence of the commission of a serious crime on November 4, the Justice Department and FBI waited five days — i.e., until the day after the midterm elections — to open the inquiry.

DOJ and Biden Agree: Searches Conducted by Non-Cleared Aides, Not the FBI

Note that the Penn Biden Center did not open until February 2018, over a year after the Obama administration ended. So investigators had to know, instantly, that the highly classified documents Biden retained after leaving office in January 2017 had to have been transferred to at least one other unauthorized location before finally landing at Biden’s Penn Biden Center office. In turn, it was reasonable to infer from this knowledge that there could be more documents in other Biden locations.

And sure enough, the Journal reports that, in the days after the Justice Department first learned about the documents, unidentified DOJ officials engaged in discussions with Biden’s legal team (presumably, both his private lawyers and Sauber) about the need to search the president’s other private properties for any additional classified documents. In light of the threat posed to national security and the need to preserve the integrity of the evidence, it was imperative that any such searches be conducted by FBI agents with high security clearances. (Recall that in the Trump classified-information case, a problem arose because the FBI assigned agents whose security clearances were not high enough to review some of the documents seized.)

Yet, although the Biden team and unidentified Justice Department officials are said to have discussed “the prospect of having FBI agents present while Mr. Biden’s lawyers conducted the additional searches,” it was ultimately decided that the bureau’s investigators would not take part. “Instead,” the Journal says, “the two sides agreed that Biden’s personal attorneys would inspect [Biden’s] homes, notify the Justice Department as soon as they identified any other potentially classified records, and arrange for law-enforcement authorities to take them.”

This boggles the mind.

To be fair, we can’t fault Attorney General Merrick Garland for not directing that prosecutors obtain warrants for the FBI to search Biden’s residences. After all, Trump apologists still argue that the Mar-a-Lago search was extreme and unnecessary — notwithstanding Trump’s defiance of a grand-jury subpoena after a year and a half spent ignoring the government’s well-justified demands that he surrender government records. A search of a former president’s home is a drastic step, and a search of a current president’s home — i.e., a search of the homes of the incumbent chief executive, at the direction of his subordinate, the attorney general — would be even more drastic. Plus, even if (as discussed above) Biden’s claims of cooperation are overstated, his less-than-helpful actions over a few days do not approach Trump’s months of stonewalling.

But note: We need to distinguish the end from the means. It was appropriate for Garland to be politically deferential to the president’s status, and therefore to refrain from immediately resorting to search warrants, which are the most intrusive means of acquiring evidence. Nevertheless, as a strict legal matter, the Justice Department did have sufficient grounds to seek a search warrant — i.e., there was probable cause that a crime had been and/or was then being committed, and that evidence of the crime would be found in the locations to be searched. It was therefore essential for Garland to ensure that the classified evidence was acquired by government agents with appropriate clearances. Only such agents could ensure that the evidence was preserved for investigative purposes, and that national security was thus protected.

Prosecutors do not necessarily need to get a search warrant just because they have legal grounds for one. If the subject of the investigation is being cooperative, a search can be consensual (i.e., warrantless, because the subject has agreed to it). In fact, a prosecutor need not even issue a grand-jury subpoena to facilitate the search if the subject is being cooperative. All that said, though, the Justice Department is duty bound to make sure that the search is done by federal law-enforcement agents — in this case, the FBI — when there are grounds to believe evidence, especially classified evidence, will be recovered. There would have been no problem with permitting Biden’s aides to be present and participate. But the search still should have been conducted principally by law enforcement.

This is common sense. Yet top Justice Department officials reportedly opted not to have the FBI participate in searches that DOJ knew the Biden team was going to undertake. And on top of that, the Biden team decided to have the searches conducted by lawyers who did not have security clearances.

Biden has already admitted, through his White House lawyer, that the documents were “inadvertently misplaced.” That is not a defense against charges of gross negligence in mishandling classified information. Consequently, while we can assume that Garland will exercise his prosecutorial discretion to decline to authorize an indictment (a choice DOJ guidance requires in the case of a sitting president), Biden’s main defense if he were facing indictment would be the farfetched claim that he didn’t know or have reason to know classified information was in his possession in multiple locations that were uniquely his, and that he is thus not responsible for the information’s potentially having been exposed to unauthorized people.

How can he now maintain even that dubious story?

Whatever he may have known or not known before November 2, he surely knew as of that date that he was in possession of at least some highly classified information, that he had been for about five years, and that there was reason to believe he was retaining still more classified information. With that knowledge, he arranged to have aides who did not have security clearances — i.e., who were not authorized to possess the documents — search for the additional documents.

Worse yet, Biden’s Justice Department knew the same things Biden knew, and still decided that Biden aides without security clearances, rather than the FBI, should conduct searches that were virtually certain to turn up — and, in fact, did turn up — more classified documents that those aides were not authorized to possess.

What a mess.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2023, 07:08:58 AM by Crafty_Dog »

ccp

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 15546
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #59 on: January 20, 2023, 08:12:31 AM »
so where are Woodward and Bernstein

during this obvious Presidential DOJ cover up ?

are we going to see a Hollywood movie about the intrigue?

will Dems come out and force Biden to resign

Clyburn of course, true to his 100% partisan religion recommends Biden for '24

 :roll:




DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 16773
    • View Profile
Re: And now, in today's episode , , ,
« Reply #62 on: January 22, 2023, 06:20:40 AM »
https://www.cnn.com/2023/01/21/politics/white-house-documents/index.html?fbclid=IwAR2fsbDf6RvrrAjBqESCSX16AICA7sPkV2fc0ZknzflDmEAx_aRxz1koKAI

Information keeps dripping out and strangely it all comes from Joe's criminal defense team.

The strangest part to me about written documents found at various Biden properties is that we have no indication that Joe can read.

For example, has he ever read a book about economics? Has he read anything about the border? Anything beyond a teleprompter? And we have seen the difficulty he has with that. It's hard to believe he had any of these documents for his own reading purposes. His reading skills follow directly from his deplorable lack of curiosity on national security and economic questions.

His reason for having the documents could only be as a conduit.

DougMacG

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 16773
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #63 on: January 22, 2023, 07:17:24 AM »
KJP: I was saying what we knew to be false to be true.

Did I get that quote right?

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2023/01/17/reporter_to_kjp_are_you_being_directed_by_someone_not_to_be_forthcoming_on_bidens_classified_documents.html

Molly Hemingway: It's abusive to put her out there.

The only explanation I see for all this is, we just reached the point where Kamala, if she ascended to the presidency, would still be eligible for two more terms.

They covered up everything from IRS targeting to Democrats writing the Russian hoax, how come they can't cover up this one?

ccp

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 15546
    • View Profile
counting to 100
« Reply #64 on: January 22, 2023, 09:30:32 AM »
even more "docs" found

countdown towards 100

at this rate

which will shut Dems up about

how Trump's is FAR FAR worse ; zero comparison

he had 100 !!!!!!

and joe takes "seriously " and is "fully cooperating"

unlike the the orange haired monster .......

Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #65 on: January 22, 2023, 01:13:23 PM »
If Biden runs again, they lose and they are out of power for a long time.

Therefore, they must get rid of Biden, as painful as the idea of Kommiela may be.

Of course, there will be plans to control her and then to get rid of her based upon her universally agreed upon incompetence and stupidity.

My current pet theory is that Obama and Nancy will look to substitute her nephew for Kommiela.

ccp

  • Power User
  • ***
  • Posts: 15546
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #66 on: January 22, 2023, 01:46:43 PM »
".My current pet theory is that Obama and Nancy will look to substitute her nephew for Kommiela."

he is almost certainly trying to set himself up for a run

some including one journalist on Newsmax think it will be Michelle Obama
using as reasons she is coming out with books and spoke at DNC
like Baraq before he ran

I am not convinced she has the "fire in the belly" though



Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
WSJ: Strassel: DOJ's double standards
« Reply #67 on: January 23, 2023, 09:18:14 AM »



The Justice Department’s Double Standards on Classified Documents
Biden and Trump both have special counsels. But the president’s lawyers got to conduct his search, while his predecessor’s weren’t even allowed to be present.
Kimberley A. Strassel hedcutBy Kimberley A. StrasselFollow
Jan. 19, 2023 6:27 pm ET



The White House can’t be happy that its document scandal has landed President Biden a special-counsel investigation. At the same time, the Justice Department has handled the affair in a way that’s proved convenient for the president.

It’s convenient that the White House was able to keep quiet for nearly 70 days the revelation that Mr. Biden inappropriately retained classified information. The media reported almost immediately in 2022 that the National Archives had asked the Justice Department to examine Donald Trump’s handling of documents and later that the Federal Bureau of Investigation had opened a probe. These unsourced stories contained details only department personnel would know—despite a strict prohibition on discussing or disclosing investigations. In the Biden case, officials managed to keep their mouths shut for months.


It’s convenient that the Biden news didn’t break prior to the midterm elections. In the Trump case, a torrent of leaks and the FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago inspired Attorney General Merrick Garland to break the policy of confidentiality. He publicly confirmed the investigation. The first Biden document was found Nov. 2 and the Justice Department knew about it by Nov. 4—four days before voters went to the polls. This time, Mr. Garland scrupulously followed policy and kept silent, allowing Team Biden more than two months to perfect the tidy story of “inadvertent” handling and “full cooperation” it later rolled out.

It’s convenient that the FBI immediately declined to engage in the Biden probe. The Journal reported Tuesday that, soon after the discovery, the Biden team “discussed with the Justice Department the prospect of having FBI agents present while Mr. Biden’s lawyers conducted the additional searches. Instead, the two sides agreed that Mr. Biden’s personal attorneys would inspect the homes.” Nice.


Former federal prosecutor Andrew McCarthy says this decision “boggles the mind.” The initial documents, including some classified at the highest security level, were discovered in an office that didn’t open until 2018—meaning they were moved there from yet another unauthorized location and heightening the likelihood of more document finds. Mr. McCarthy says the Justice Department is “duty bound” to ensure searches are “done by federal law enforcement agents—in this case, the FBI—when there are grounds to believe evidence, especially classified evidence, will be recovered.” Only agents “with high security clearances” could “ensure that the evidence was preserved for investigative purposes, and that national security was thus protected.”

Instead, the process was left entirely to Mr. Biden’s private lawyers, who didn’t have security clearances—allowing them access to national secrets and the potential to glean the nature of the material found (which might be useful in a later Biden defense). It also allowed them to craft the circumstances of the discovery—where they were, their condition, whether they were easily observable. The department allowed this process to continue even after the first tranche of additional documents was discovered—even though this confirmed the potential for yet more.

Biden attorney Bob Bauer in a recent memo laid out the “protocols” the attorneys followed in each instance of a document find, and assured that nobody saw or did anything improper. But this is an extraordinary level of trust—one the Justice Department doesn’t afford others suspected of mishandling classified information. Mr. Trump’s lawyers weren’t allowed to be present when the FBI searched Mar-a-Lago.

Putting the Biden legal team in charge also conveniently meant there would be no public FBI display to equate the Biden document mess to the Trump one. Biden defenders, including the media, continue to insist that what makes this case different is the Biden team’s dedication to discovering and returning classified information. That’s a hard case to make when the FBI takes over the process.

Finally, a little too convenient is the White House’s argument that it can’t speak to any of this given the investigation. Press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre remained mum even when informed by an NBC reporter that the Justice Department said it hadn’t told the White House it couldn’t speak to the underlying facts.

Mr. Garland is getting praise from the usual quarters for handling the Biden case with discretion, restraint and professionalism. The problem is that these supposed qualities seem to arise depending on partisan circumstances—and the unequal treatment predates Mr. Garland’s tenure. Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden are handled with kid gloves. Carter Page and Donald Trump—not to mention low-profile suspects—face the bluntest federal law-enforcement tools.

Despite all these advantages, Mr. Biden nonetheless faces a special counsel investigation. Yet the history here requires that probe receive extra scrutiny. The Justice Department seems unlikely to be done bestowing conveniences on this president.

Write to kim@wsj.com.


Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile




Crafty_Dog

  • Administrator
  • Power User
  • *****
  • Posts: 62817
    • View Profile
Re: Penn-Biden Think Tank, the Corvette Papers, and related matters
« Reply #73 on: January 31, 2023, 11:48:54 AM »
For ease of research down the road, pasting CCP's post here as well:

https://nypost.com/2023/01/31/fbi-searched-penn-biden-center-for-classified-docs-in-mid-november/

but we only hear about it now

Biden and China via U of P

then China $ to U of P

and $ to Hunter ..... then Hunter $ to Joe and uncle

interesting Antony Blinks was a director of the center in 2018:

https://nypost.com/2022/04/09/54m-in-chinese-gifts-donated-to-upenn-home-of-biden-center/

funny he is named Sec of S in 2020.    :wink:

professor emeritus of international corruption (woops ) , I mean International Relations urged Hunters daughter to go to all exp. paid to trip to open doors for her in China .

https://nypost.com/2023/01/21/upenn-teacher-urged-hunter-bidens-kid-to-cash-in-on-name/
Modify message