Author Topic: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom  (Read 902209 times)

DougMacG

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Homeland [in]Security, Neglecting to protect our Border
« Reply #2550 on: May 05, 2022, 06:29:42 AM »
https://www.realclearinvestigations.com/articles/2022/05/03/all_the_biden_border_policies_that_have_migrants_heading_north_830219.html

"Since Joe Biden’s first day in office, when he signed seven executive orders on immigration that, among other things, suspended deportations and ended the Trump administration’s “Remain in Mexico” program that had eased the crush of those awaiting asylum hearings, the president has in word and deed sent signals that migrants have interpreted as welcoming. The initiatives include reviving the Obama-era policy known as “catch and release,” “paroling” illegal border crossers so they can enter the country, resettling migrants through secret flights around the country, and ending the “no match” policy that had helped the government identify people who were using fraudulent credentials to find work."
...
“We’re stopping nobody coming into our country,” said Clint McDonald, the executive director of the Texas/Southwestern Texas Border Sheriffs’ Coalition, “and we have no idea who is in our country.”
...
Within hours of taking office Biden began to make good on his signals, moving aggressively against the existing infrastructure that dealt with illegal immigration at the southern border. In addition to temporarily suspending deportations and ending the “Remain in Mexico” program, he issued an executive order stopping work on Trump’s border wall. Policy memos from the Homeland Security also gave Customs and Border Protection and ICE agents more latitude in how they handle people encountered crossing the southern border without papers. These policy directives effectively ended ICE’s usual practice of taking custody of immigrants released from local or state jails, and placed more restrictions on the ability of federal authorities to arrest illegal immigrants.
...
In yet another policy change that facilitates illegal immigration, the Social Security Administration quietly announced on its website last May that it would cease to issue what are known as “no-match” letters, which informed employers of discrepancies between its records and information provided by employees. Critics of the system said it targeted immigrants and claimed the letters were often sent in error. The SSA reportedly sent 791,000 no-match letters in 2020.
...
Most recently, the Biden administration insisted on ending Title 42, a clause from a 1944 public health law the Trump administration had used to limit illegal immigration during the COVID pandemic. Experts predicted its removal would lead to a tsunami of more illegal immigrants, and at least 10 congressional Democrats, including those up for reelection this year such as Georgia Sen. Raphael Warnock, have voiced reservations about lifting it.

Much more at the link.


Crafty_Dog

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ET: DHS explanations for empty beds don't add up
« Reply #2552 on: May 11, 2022, 08:49:29 AM »
Explanations for detention bed vacancies don’t add up

Plea to end Mexico policy gets muddled

BY STEPHEN DINAN THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Biden’s attorney, defending the government’s immigration policies to the Supreme Court late last month, painted a picture of an administration eager to detain illegal immigrants to the full extent of the law but stymied by a stingy Congress that won’t provide any more beds.

The numbers don’t back that up. From Dec. 1 to March 31, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Homeland Security Department agency tasked with detaining illegal immigrants, left an average of more than 7,600 beds empty on any given day, or about 27% of its total capacity.

Now, as the Biden administration pleads with the justices for permission to end the Trump-era “Remain in Mexico” policy, those empty beds could come back to haunt officials.

“If you are complying with the law, you are going to use as close as possible to the total number of ICE beds you are authorized for,” said Gene Hamilton, a former top official at the Justice and Homeland

Security departments who has tracked the Supreme Court case for America First Legal. “It’s another example of just being very disingenuous with what their capabilities are as compared to what the law requires.”

The beds are at the core of immigration policy. Under the law, Congress laid out three options for handling illegal immigrants caught jumping the border. They can be detained while they fight deportation, they can be “paroled” into the country in limited circumstances where there is a compelling public interest, or they can be pushed back into Mexico to wait for their deportation cases to be processed.

That latter option was the basis for Remain in Mexico, officially known as the Migrant Protection Protocols, or MPP, which the Trump administration used to resolve the border surge in 2019.

Now facing a worse surge, the Biden administration says MPP is cruel and doesn’t want to use it.

The administration also is reluctant to use all the detention space it has been given and instead is paroling record numbers of people, sometimes nearly 100,000 a month, into the U.S.

“Historically, the detention beds have not been used effectively. We are emphasizing use of alternatives to detention,” Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas told Congress in hearings late last month.

Mr. Mayorkas said he wants to use detention only when it is “a public safety imperative” or it’s critical that someone show up for their deportation proceedings in court.

The problem is that just a day before Mr. Mayorkas’ testimony, the Biden administration’s solicitor general, Elizabeth Prelogar, was painting a different picture for the justices. She suggested that Mr. Mayorkas is using every bed Congress has given him.

“Congress expected us to use the detention capacity that we have, and that’s what we’re doing,” she told the court.

She said Homeland Security was at full capacity in March.

“At that point in time, DHS was appropriated for a little under 32,000 detention beds,” she said. “And the average daily amount of detention over that same month was also at about 32,000 individuals. That’s ICE being a little under its capacity and CBP being over capacity.”

Andrew “Art” Arthur, a resident fellow in law and policy at the Center for Immigration Studies, said equating ICE and CBP beds doesn’t work.

CBP space is for short-term custody while fingerprinting, checking records and figuring out what happens next for an illegal immigrant. By contrast, ICE uses jail cells meant for longer-term detention. Indeed, in many instances, ICE is renting jail space from local communities.

“She could have clarified the facts of this a whole lot better than she did,” Mr. Arthur told The Washington Times.

Experts said ICE’s capacity matters when it comes to ending the cycle of catch-and-release of border jumpers. If they can be detained while awaiting their court hearings, they can be deported in a matter of weeks. Those who are released can linger in the system for six to eight years — if they bother to show up for court dates at all.

Digging into the numbers only makes things murkier.

The Justice Department, in filings with a lower court judge in the case, said CBP’s holding capacity is about 6,000 spaces. Mr. Mayorkas said CBP can hold at least 13,000 people under his new border plan and will have the capacity for 18,000 by later this month.

The Times reached out to CBP last week to clarify which figure is correct, but the agency did not provide a response in time for this article.

The fuzziness of CBP’s numbers underscores the difference between its capacity and the capacity for ICE, where Congress has set a hard cap of funding for 34,000 beds.

ICE said that meant bed space for 31,500 adults as of March 15, but because of COVID-19 restrictions and court orders, its actual operating capacity was 25,780 beds.

On any given day, ICE left more than 5,000 of those beds empty, with an average daily capacity of 20,045 people. The low point was March 4, when it counted 17,988 detainees. The high point was March 21, when it tallied 21,287 people, 4,000 beds shy of capacity.

Looking back from Dec. 1 to March 31, the agency averaged more than 7,600 empty beds a day, according to data ICE has submitted to the court.

The justices homed in on detention capacity in exchanges with Ms. Prelogar.

“You’re sort of making it even harder for you to do anything other than release the people encountered at the border into the United States,” Chief Justice John G. Robert Jr. told her — though he quickly acknowledged that there are “not nearly enough beds to take care of the problem.”

“Did you ask for more?” Justice Stephen G. Breyer prodded Ms. Prelogar.

She ignored the question the first time he asked it, but he came back to it minutes later: “Has the administration asked Congress for more money for detention?”

Ms. Prelogar didn’t answer directly. She said only that funding decisions are up to Congress. She did say Mr. Biden’s new budget asks for more immigration judges to expedite cases and more ways to monitor migrants who are caught and released.

She did not mention that Mr. Biden has asked for fewer beds. His budget would slash 9,000 beds from ICE’s inventory by cutting the spending from $2.9 billion to $2.4 billion.

The Justice Department declined to comment on the record for this article.

Immigrant rights legal advocates contacted by The Times didn’t respond to inquiries.

Neither did Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, the lead challenger to the Biden administration in the case.

Mr. Hamilton said the Biden administration’s bed cuts undermine the argument that the administration is making a good-faith effort to comply with the law.

“You’re admitting you don’t have the ability to detain everybody, and you’re also admitting you don’t want to use MPP, and you’re also admitting you have a record flood of people at the border — hundreds of thousands a month — and yet you’re asking for fewer beds from Congress?” he said.

The Trump administration took the opposite approach. It asked for more detention space. When Congress lowballed the number, the Trump administration used flexibility in the law to reprogram money and add more beds.

Biden officials treat detention as an option only for worst cases.

“In a world where we don’t have sufficient beds, as everyone acknowledges, there is an imperative public interest in ensuring that we are detaining the people who might be criminals or who might abscond or who threaten our national security, and not simply filling those beds on a first-come basis with no accounting for the limited detention capacity,” Ms. Prelogar told the high court.

She also said MPP relies on cooperation from Mexico.

The Trump administration won that cooperation through threats of economic sanctions. The Biden administration has been reluctant to use similar pressure tactics, and Mexico’s cooperation on taking back migrants has deteriorated.

During the April 26 oral argument, Ms. Prelogar said Mr. Mayorkas has made a carefully crafted decision that the public interest is better served by releasing illegal immigrants rather than pushing them back to Mexico.

She said the high court doesn’t need to evaluate detention beds at this point.

The only question before the justices right now, she said, is whether Mr. Mayorkas has the freedom to end MPP.

“I think that the secretary is well justified in thinking that in light of the tremendous costs that he identified with the program and in light of his determination that it actually detracted from other strategies and programs he thought would be more effective in stemming the tide of irregular migration, that he was well justified in making that policy determination,” Ms. Prelogar said.


Immigration and Custom Enforcement had thousands of empty beds at its detention facilities in March even with a flood of border jumpers and the Biden administration’s reluctance to return them to Mexico. ASSOCIATED PRESS


Crafty_Dog

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AZ too begins shipping illegals to DC
« Reply #2554 on: May 13, 2022, 05:51:57 AM »
Arizona follows Texas’ lead, buses migrants to Washington

BY STEPHEN DINAN THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Arizona has started its own busing campaign to deliver newly arrived illegal immigrants straight to Washington, following in the footsteps of Texas, which pioneered the policy last month.

Gov. Doug Ducey announced the move as part of a broader border security crackdown that includes deploying more National Guard troops and working with ranchers and other landowners to try to secure their property from the onslaught of migrants.

Mr. Ducey’s office confirmed to local news outlets that the first bus arrived Wednesday, carrying 20 people.

The governor said he turned to busing because Arizona’s communities are overwhelmed by the number of illegal immigrants being caught and released, and they aren’t getting much help from the feds.

Migrants who are being shipped to Washington volunteered for the trip, meaning it’s likely they were already headed to the East Coast anyway. Mr. Ducey’s office said they will be fed and will have access to “support” services while on the road.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott pioneered the busing strategy, with the first shipment of illegal immigrants from his state reaching Washington a month ago.

Texas has averaged more than a bus a day, with 32 loads so far, totaling 835 migrants, according to the governor’s office. All of the migrants volunteered to come. They are being dropped off near the U.S. Capitol.

The federal government has sent mixed signals on busing operations.

The White House initially mocked Mr. Abbott, saying he was helping migrants reach their final destinations and at Texas taxpayers’ expense.

But Homeland Security offi cials said the busing operation was interfering with its efforts to keep track of the migrants.

“As individuals await the outcome of their immigration proceedings, they are legally obligated to report in for the next steps in their immigration process and permitted to travel elsewhere. CBP’s close partnerships with other government and non-governmental stakeholders are essential to this effort, and to ensuring fairness, order, and humanity in the process,” Chris Magnus, commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, said last month.

The Border Patrol’s Tucson and Yuma sectors, which cover all of Arizona and a sliver of eastern California, tallied nearly 57,000 illegal entry attempts in March, the latest month for which data has been released. That’s the highest rate in years.

Less than half of those caught were turned back under the Title 42 pandemic border shutdown. Given rates of recidivism and “gotaways” — those who made it in while avoiding capture — it means a majority of illegal crossers were successful.

Communities have been so overwhelmed that one city mayor took to piling illegal immigrants into his vehicle and driving them to the airport in Phoenix so they could disperse throughout the country

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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Re: Hit squads coming through?
« Reply #2556 on: May 24, 2022, 01:01:47 PM »
https://michaelyon.locals.com/upost/2184351/possible-dic-to-bush-strike-attempt

Easy for anyone globally to send hitters anywhere in the US over our wide open border.

No prints on file, no DNA database to connect them to a US crime scene.

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Border agents still to get disciplined
« Reply #2560 on: June 15, 2022, 02:03:52 PM »

G M

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Re: Border agents still to get disciplined
« Reply #2561 on: June 15, 2022, 02:25:30 PM »
for administrative reasons whatever that means

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/dhs-punish-border-patrol-agents-haitian-whipping-incident

 :x

It's like we live in a post-constitutional banana republic.

Be sure to voter harder!



Crafty_Dog

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2562 on: June 15, 2022, 03:20:30 PM »
« Last Edit: June 15, 2022, 03:29:23 PM by Crafty_Dog »

G M

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2563 on: June 15, 2022, 07:38:33 PM »
You've been voting for how long?

And here we are.



A profound outrage!

https://dailycaller.com/2022/06/15/border-migrants-immigration-haiti-biden/?utm_source=piano&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2680&pnespid=6L9nDHgbM7JC3KfE_DKwGpeFsUq0V5V3IvDixrd58BpmgHSkD6nUXldZekI4AWiPPAe8D7V1

And yes, one more reason to vote harder.

If a fix of the vote changes the outcome, then it will be time to re-examine.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2564 on: June 16, 2022, 01:44:37 AM »
Let's take this to the Electoral thread.

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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Running out the clock
« Reply #2566 on: June 23, 2022, 10:04:44 PM »
Tricky legal issues when it comes to undrawing a guilty plea , , , the Judge has ultimate say if I am not mistaken.

A separate issue from the many federal charges that could be filed against many deep state operatives and aren't. It's called running out the clock.

https://emeralddb3.substack.com/p/durham-played-you-for-a-fool?utm_source=email

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2567 on: June 23, 2022, 10:50:31 PM »
Dammit man!  You are relentless!

Meanwhile here is this:

https://michaelyon.locals.com/upost/2324583/american-d-day


Crafty_Dog

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ET: Fed Court: Biden/Mayorkas cannot ignore law, must remove IAs
« Reply #2569 on: July 09, 2022, 01:51:41 PM »
JUDICIARY
Biden Administration Cannot Ignore Federal Law, Must Remove Illegal Alien Criminals: Court
By Zachary Stieber July 8, 2022 Updated: July 8, 2022biggersmaller Print

President Joe Biden’s administration cannot ignore federal law that says authorities must arrest, detain, and remove illegal aliens convicted of certain crimes and/or aliens who are ordered deported, an appeals court has ruled.

Federal law says the attorney general “shall take into custody,” “shall detain,” and “shall remove” illegal aliens convicted of certain crimes and aliens who are ordered deported. But the Biden administration has attempted to prevent the holding and removal of some illegal immigrants convicted of those crimes.

“The fact an individual is a removable noncitizen therefore should not alone be the basis of an enforcement action against them,” Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, a Biden appointee, said in a memorandum in September 2021 outlining new guidance that narrowed immigration enforcement priorities.

Mayorkas also said that immigration agents should not “rely on the fact of conviction … alone” when deciding to take action against an alien.

That has led to a sharp drop in criminal aliens detained by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), a panel of the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals said. The memo and others like it has led to a spike in the rescinding of criminal detainers, or orders to local authorities to detain aliens, court documents show. One hundred and seventy aliens had detainers rescinded in Texas between Jan. 20, 2021, and Feb. 15, 2022, with at least 17 failing to comply with their parole conditions and four committing fresh crimes.

“The data show that the Final Memo ‘increases the number of aliens with criminal convictions and aliens with final orders of removal released into the United States,’ and Texas has shown by a preponderance of the evidence that the cost of that reality has fallen on it and will continue to do so,'” the panel said in a ruling dated July 6.

DHS is trying “to claim it acts within the bounds of federal law while practically disregarding that law,” it added.

The panel upheld an earlier ruling from U.S. District Judge Drew Tipton, a Trump appointee who said the policy had resulted in criminal aliens “roam[ing] free” and ordered the department not to follow the memo.

The Biden administration had appealed, arguing that the lower court order should be overturned because the states lack standing, because they have not suffered any injury, and because any injury that the speculative injury was not traceable to the Mayorkas memo. The appeals court panel disagreed.

Response
Biden “tried to throw out immigration law, saying DHS didn’t have to detain criminal illegals. The court now says he must,” Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, one of the plaintiffs, said in a statement.

“Had the administration won its stay, it would have gone on releasing criminal aliens while its appeal of the district court’s ruling wound through the courts,” added Dale Wilcox, executive director of the Immigration Reform Law Institute, which filed a brief in the case. “We are pleased that didn’t happen, and applaud the Fifth Circuit for denying the administration the extra time it sought to violate the law and endanger Americans.”

The administration is expected to appeal, which could send the case to the full Fifth Circuit or to the Supreme Court, which recently ruled the administration can end the Trump era “Remain in Mexico” policy while explicitly avoiding weighing in on whether the detention requirement outlined in federal law is “subject to principles of law enforcement discretion” and whether the administration’s current approach to immigration enforcement violates the provision.

The panel consisted of Judges Edith Jones, a Reagan appointee; Edith Clement, a George W. Bush appointee; and Kurt Engelhardt, a Trump appointee.

Its ruling diverged from an opinion from the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in a similar case brought by the states of Arizona, Montana, and Ohio that in April overturned (pdf) a lower court’s nationwide preliminary injunction that blocked the same guidance.

The Fifth Circuit panel said its divergence is explainable by the benefit of bench trial and precedent in other cases brought before the court. “Until there is a contrary ruling from the Supreme Court, we adhere to our precedent and the facts found by the district court,” it said.

ccp

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2570 on: July 09, 2022, 02:22:51 PM »
"President Joe Biden’s administration cannot ignore federal law that says authorities must arrest, detain, and remove illegal aliens convicted of certain crimes and/or aliens who are ordered deported, an appeals court has ruled."

which is exactly what they have been doing for 18 months

the only remedy would be impeachment - which will not happen
and
then we get Harris anyway

we are stuck till '24.


Crafty_Dog

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2571 on: July 09, 2022, 05:20:05 PM »
Both Biden and Harris can legitimately be impeached for dereliction of duty under Article 4 Section 4.  If Reps take House, Speaker of the House will be Rep.

Just sayin' , , ,

G M

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2572 on: July 09, 2022, 09:15:33 PM »
Did the dems promise not to cheat this time?



Both Biden and Harris can legitimately be impeached for dereliction of duty under Article 4 Section 4.  If Reps take House, Speaker of the House will be Rep.

Just sayin' , , ,


G M

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ccp

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2575 on: July 14, 2022, 07:58:55 AM »
"It's almost like the feral government is controlled by enemies of the American people, isn't it?"

everything this administration does is to hurt US citizens

and make things worse

=YES  it does seem this way -

In my lifetime there was never an administration or party that went to such great lengths
to screw its own citizens

Jimmy Carter , was bad but nothing like this.
Obama however, was terrible too, just a bit more subdued in efforts to screw us over.

DougMacG

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Border Protection, Overdose deaths hit record, Democrats don't care
« Reply #2576 on: July 15, 2022, 10:56:49 AM »
Build the damn wall.  108,000 reasons (per year) to do it.   Secure the border.

https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/11/health/drug-overdose-deaths-record-high-2021/index.html

According to the DEA, Los Angeles is a major transport and shipment hub for illegal drugs coming from the U.S.-Mexico border and are often stored in warehouses, storage units and residential properties in the region.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/1-million-fentanyl-pills-linked-to-sinaloa-cartel-seized-in-record-breaking-drug-bust/ar-AAZBJXv?cvid=526e5d0507fa4044a14f5d11fad78c24
« Last Edit: July 15, 2022, 11:04:58 AM by DougMacG »

ccp

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2577 on: July 15, 2022, 11:46:40 AM »
over 100K people dying of fentanyl
drugs

but they can't blame it on doctors over prescribing anymore

don't expect politicians or Democrats to take any responsibility

this will only get air time if Republicans get control back


till then we are only to worry that politically incorrect speech may cause trans to kill themselves

Crafty_Dog

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ET: Biden makes two big changes for Illegals
« Reply #2578 on: July 16, 2022, 01:08:18 PM »
IMMIGRATION & BORDER SECURITY
Biden Administration Makes Two Big Changes to Help Illegal Immigrants
By Zachary Stieber July 16, 2022 Updated: July 16, 2022biggersmaller Print


President Joe Biden’s administration has made two major changes to immigration policies by re-interpreting federal law.

Immigrants, many illegal, from certain countries are shielded from deportation and allowed to be legally employed if the secretary of homeland security decides their home country meets certain conditions.

The designation is known as Temporary Protected Status (TPS).

Fifteen countries are currently designated, including Afghanistan, El Salvador, Somalia, Ukraine, and Venezuela. Hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of immigrants from those countries are protected.

Up until July, those protected by TPS had to remain in the country unless they received approval to travel.

If TPS beneficiaries did leave the country and returned, they’d have the same status—illegal or legal—when they returned, based on language from Miscellaneous and Technical Immigration and Naturalization Amendments, even though they could remain temporarily protected by TPS.

But U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), which handles the nation’s legal immigration system, has changed that policy.

Now, all beneficiaries that return will be “inspected and admitted,” a bureaucratic term that means one has entered the country legally. “This is true even if the TPS beneficiary was present without admission or parole when initially granted TPS,” USCIS said in an alert (pdf).

“That basically launders the fact that they came here illegally and that will put them on the path to a green card,” Jessica Vaughan, policy studies director at the Center for Immigration Studies, told The Epoch Times.

“This is an end run on U.S. immigration law, and Congress,” added Emilio Gonzalez, who directed USCIS during the George W. Bush administration. “It really is a left-handed way of legalizing people.”

USCIS said in its alert that the change stemmed from a court decision, guidance from the lawyers at its parent agency, the Department of Homeland Security, and an evaluation of current and past policy. The agency did not respond to requests for comment.

Supreme Court
The Supreme Court in 2021 ruled that immigrants who receive TPS are not admitted for purposes of obtaining legal permanent residency.

“A grant of TPS does not cure a foreign national’s entry without inspection or constitute an inspection and admission of the foreign national,’” Justice Elena Kagan, an Obama appointee, wrote in the 9–0 decision.

But USCIS seized on a footnote in the ruling, in which the court said it was not expressing a view on whether a parole enables a TPS recipient to become a legal permanent resident. The secretary of homeland security can parole an illegal immigrant, which allows them to enter or remain in the country legally.

The USCIS also cited a decision from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, which said that the law mandates TPS beneficiaries who travel outside the country be inspected and admitted upon returning, and be treated as entering the United States legally, even if they originally entered illegally.

The DHS Office of General Counsel, on the request of USCIS, reviewed the rulings and the law and concluded that USCIS was “well within its authority” to rescind Trump era guidance and allow illegal immigrants to use leaving the country and coming back to become legal.

“This is just a transparent workaround that I believe is illegal, and almost certainly is going to be challenged,” Vaughan said.

Epoch Times Photo
Activists and with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) march in Washington on Feb. 23, 2021. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Another Big Change
The Immigration and Nationality Act, says that immigrants who were illegally in the United States and left cannot re-enter for a certain period of time. Illegal immigrants who were in the country for less than one year have to wait three years to be able to re-enter the country; those who were present for one year or more would be inadmissible unless he or she waits 10 years to re-enter.

The immigrants were expected to wait outside the United States, to comply with the law.

USCIS, though, is now saying that an immigrant can be inside the United States, and that will not reset the clock.

“The statutory 3-year or 10-year period begins to run on the day of departure or removal (whichever applies) after accrual of the period of unlawful presence. This statutory period continues to run, without interruption, regardless of whether or how the noncitizen returned to the United States during the 3-year or 10-year period. Thus, it is immaterial whether the noncitizen has spent the applicable statutory 3-year or 10-year period in or out of the United States,” USCIS says in its policy manual.

The change was made on June 24 to be consistent with two recent court rulings and an unpublished Department of Justice Board of Appeals decision, the agency said in an alert on the alteration.

“This is basically an invitation for any deported alien to pay the cartels to smuggle them back into the U.S. while they let the clock run out,” Rob Law, who headed the USCIS policy office during the Trump administration and directs the America First Policy Institute’s Center for Homeland Security and Immigration, told the Washington Times, which first reported on the update.

Court Decisions
The move stemmed from two 2020 rulings.

In the first, a Japanese woman overstayed her nonimmigrant status by five years. She left voluntarily in 2003 but returned just two years later, well before the 10-year period mandated in the law.

While she didn’t follow U.S. immigration law, her lawyer argued she shouldn’t have been denied permanent residency when she applied for it in 2019 because she was married to a United States citizen and because over 10 years had elapsed.

Government lawyers said that aliens to whom the law applies “must remain outside of the country for the entire duration of the inadmissibility period” and, if they do not, they cannot be admitted.

U.S. District Judge Consuelo Marshall, a Carter appointee, ruled for the plaintiff, agreeing on the argument that over 10 years had gone by before Yayomi Kanai asked for residency.

“This policy change would be great for our client. That means she could have been granted adjustment of status by the USCIS and she wouldn’t have had to go through all these problems,” Michael Piston, who represented Kanai, told The Epoch Times.

“It feels very, very good that they’re doing the right thing,” Mario Urizar, a lawyer who represented the man in the other case, told The Epoch Times.

In that case, a Brazilian national overstayed a tourist visa and was ordered deported in 1994. He left the United States in 2000.

Two years later, the man re-entered, even though the 10 years had not elapsed. When he went to adjust his status later, in 2016, authorities noted he violated the law and thus remained inadmissible.

U.S. District Judge Kevin McNulty, an Obama appointee, ruled that the law “is silent” on the time after 10 years elapses. He said imposing what amounted to a lifetime ban from the United States was wrong.

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WT: Illegals evade notices for court
« Reply #2579 on: July 29, 2022, 04:37:55 AM »
IMMIGRATION

ICE officers pulled off security duty to go on wild ‘ghost’ chase

Illegal border crossers evade notices for court

BY STEPHEN DINAN THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Exclusive

The Biden administration’s attempt to track down catch-and-release illegal immigrants and serve them with court summonses turned into a “complete waste of time,” according to officers who say they were pulled off higher priority cases to chase down “ghosts.”

Out of a universe of more than 30,000 potential targets, officers were able to locate and serve only about 600, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement sources.

That means tens of thousands of illegal border crossers remain at large in the country without an official Notice to Appear for their immigration proceedings — and there are no good prospects for tracking them down.

Officers who spoke to The Washington Times said the agency should have known the operation was doomed because the migrants had given bogus addresses to authorities when they were caught at the border.

Also, themigrants haven’t been in the U.S. long enough to generate phone or utility records that would allow them to be tracked down.

“I haven’t went on one where there was a person at the house where they said they would be,” one West Coast offi cer said. “It seems like this administration is trying to find busy work to keep us from actually arresting people.”

“I’ve got child molesters, I’ve got aggravated felons, I’ve got more important people to go after,” said an officer who works the southern part of the country.

“There were plenty of good cases that we’ve had to push to the side because, on a weekly basis, we had to go out and try to do something with these cases,” said an officer who works on the East Coast. “It was basically three months of at least going out weekly when there were plenty of cases that were definitely more of a public safety consideration that we couldn’t work.”

The Washington Times contacted ICE multiple times for this article, but the agency did not comment.

The Times revealed the atlarge operation in April. At that time, ICE called it a “law enforcement sensitive” matter but said the migrants targeted counted as enforcement priorities under Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas’ framework.

Officers counter that the operation was a distraction, leaving them chasing “ghosts” instead of going after the big cases Mr. Mayorkas said he wanted.

“They say they have us focusing on the worst of the worst, but they took us off of these quality cases to do this, which never should have happened in the first place,” the East Coast officer said.

That “never should have happened” remark referred to the way the migrants were handled at the border.

When illegal immigrants are caught and released, they are usually served with court summonses, known in the field as a Notice to Appear.

But during the initial wave of the Biden border surge last year, the number of migrants caught and released was so overwhelming that Border Patrol agents were instructed not to do the full processing of an NTA and instead issue a Notice to Report.

Issuing an NTA can take 90 minutes to fill out the forms, while issuing an NTR can take just a small fraction of that time. That meant agents could move migrants through the processing more quickly.

Rodney Scott, who was chief of the Border Patrol at the time, said it was a calculated decision designed to get agents back into the field quickly so they could try to detect other illegal crossings.

“We carved out the groups of individuals that the Biden administration had already said were going to be released, and only after we did records checks,” he told The Times.

Mr. Scott said they knew the chance that the migrants would ever be removed from the U.S., whether they were issued NTAs or not, was close to zero, so the balance of risks made it more important to speed through them to get agents back on the line.

“We decided to prioritize national security and having agents on the border,” he said.

An NTA enters a migrant into deportation proceedings. Migrants can be ordered removed by immigration judges if they don’t show up for their hearings.

Those given NTRs are not officially in deportation court proceedings. Instead, an NTR asks them to check in with an ICE office within 60 days and, usually, to collect an NTA.

Tens of thousands have failed to do so.

In communications to Congress, Mr. Mayorkas revealed that from late March to the end of July last year, 104,171 illegal immigrants were caught and released with NTRs. About half had failed to check in.

ICE was then assigned cleanup duty.

The agency tried to send NTAs to the addresses that the migrants reported to border authorities, but in many cases, the addresses were bad. ICE decided to pull its fugitive operations teams off their normal duties and try to clean up the mess by tracking down the absconders in communities.

ICE’s Law Enforcement Support Center, based in Vermont, was roped in to come up with addresses to give to the fugitive teams. The problem, officers said, is that they had little to work with and the migrants haven’t been in the U.S. long enough to develop the kind of electronic trail that would help track them down.

Even when the right street address was included, the apartment number might have been wrong. That left officers with the choice of giving up or knocking on all the doors in a building — which could feed into fears of ICE “raids.”

Of the 600 or so migrants tracked down, some were issued NTAs on the spot. Others were issued ICE’s Form G-56 instructing them to check in at an ICE office.

That meant even more processing time, which meant less time out looking for high-value targets, officers said.

The officers were particularly frustrated at having to play cleanup. If the Department of Homeland Security had been on top of the situation, they said, the migrants would have been served NTAs in the usual way at the border and ICE’s fugitive operations teams never would have been dragged into the matter.

It was particularly galling to officers because, even if they did track down one of the border migrants, they weren’t arresting or detaining them, merely issuing new paperwork, officers said.

“If I wasn’t going after that guy, I could be going after another guy I could potentially be taking into custody or removing,” the West Coast officer told The Times.

It’s not clear what Homeland Security’s next steps are for the tens of thousands of migrants who couldn’t be found. One of the ICE officers said the fugitive teams have been told to expect ongoing operations to try to track down the absconders.


OVERWHELMING: So many people were crossing into the U.S. illegally that Border Patrol officers didn’t have time to process official documents for hearings. ASSOCIATED PRESS


Rodney Scott, as chief of the Border Patrol, said he wanted to get agents into the field instead of doing paperwork. He acknowledged he knew that many illegal immigrants would never be removed. ASSOCIATED PRESS

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WT: The Wall in AZ
« Reply #2580 on: July 29, 2022, 04:47:02 AM »
second

Homeland Security defends new border wall construction

Says it will save migrants’ lives

BY STEPHEN DINAN THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Homeland Security announced plans Thursday to complete sections of President Trump’s border wall in Yuma, Arizona, defending the new construction as a way to save illegal immigrants’ lives.

The four gaps were left in the wall when President Biden took office and shut down wall construction, looking to make good on his campaign promise not to build “another foot” of his predecessor’s marquee project.

But Homeland Security says it has concluded some of the halted projects were too essential to forgo — including the ones in Yuma.

The department, in a statement, cast the new construction as a way to protect illegal immigrants themselves from running risks by trying to run through the gaps.

“Due to the proximity to the Morelos Dam and the swift-moving Colorado River, this area presents safety and life hazard risks for migrants attempting to cross into the United States where there is a risk of drownings and injuries from falls,” the department said. “This area also poses a life and safety risk to first responders and agents responding to incidents in this area.”

The dam spans the Colorado River and has become a key crossing point for illegal immigrants, who then walk through one of the gaps in the wall on the U.S. side. Customs and Border Protection has released a video of migrants doing just that.

In June, a 5-year-old migrant child drowned at that point in the river. The child’s mother told agents she had last seen her child near the dam.

Homeland Security said funding for the construction will come out of $2 billion or so in border wall money Congress allocated during the Trump administration, but which has sat idle since Mr. Biden took office.

The department didn’t give a timeline for construction and said environmental concerns will still have to be addressed.

Arizona Sen. Mark Kelly told local news that the first contracts will be done by the end of September.

Mr. Kelly, a Democrat, portrayed the new wall construction as critical to gaining control of the border.

“I’m glad that the Department of Homeland Security has listened to Arizona and is going to close these gaps,” he said.

Mr. Kelly, who is facing a tough reelection battle this year, said he raised the gaps with Mr. Biden last year and had “numerous calls” with Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas over the issue


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Accidentally on purpose?
« Reply #2582 on: August 01, 2022, 05:50:44 AM »
IMMIGRATION

Study: 17% of new cases tossed due to filing errors

BY STEPHEN DINAN THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Immigration judges are tossing one out of every six new immigration cases because Homeland Security failed to file a basic form — the original court summons — according to a new study.

When illegal border jumpers are nabbed, Customs and Border Protection is supposed to issue the migrant a Notice to Appear, which is a summons for immigration court. CBP is then supposed to file the NTA with the immigration court itself.

But CBP failed to file the form in nearly 17% of cases so far this fiscal year, according to data compiled by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University and released Friday.

Analysts said it was a shocking bungle.

“DHS needs to get its priorities in order to ensure cases are properly filed, that aliens are properly served and that the ICE attorney is ready to go forward in court on the hearing date,” said Andrew “Art” Arthur, a former immigration judge and now a fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies. “This is indicative of a lack of interest on the part of the Biden administration in actually enforcing immigration laws.”

The Washington Times has reached out to CBP for comment.

The new TRAC report adds to a growing pile of evidence for how badly the Biden team has mishandled the record surge of illegal immigrants at the border.

The Times reported last week on tens of thousands of illegal immigrants who were caught and released without even an NTA being issued. Officers at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement were tasked this spring with tracking down some of them and serving them with the paperwork.

Out of more than 30,000 potential targets, roughly 600 were able to be served .

Officials have blamed the record numbers at the border for upsetting CBP’s processing. Issuing an NTA can take 90 minutes per person.

Once an NTA is issued, a migrant is entered into deportation proceedings and has an immigration court date scheduled. TRAC said CBP is required to upload the NTA into the court’s computer system before the first hearing.

That final step isn’t happening, TRAC said.

TRAC said it was previously exceedingly rare for an NTA not to be filed. In 2016, for example, just 11 cases out of 178,052 were dismissed because an NTA wasn’t filed.

That rose to about 1 in 40 cases in 2020. But the rate soared under the Biden administration, reaching more than 1 in 10 cases last year and now reaching 1 in 6 so far this fiscal year.

“This is exceedingly wasteful of the Court’s time. It is also problematic for the immigrant (and possibly their attorney) if they show up at hearings only to have the case dismissed by the Immigration Judge because the case hasn’t actually been filed with the Court,” TRAC said.

Mr. Arthur said if a case is dismissed for lack of an NTA, Homeland Security needs to reserve the migrant with new paperwork with a new court date.

That requires the willingness — and ability — to locate and serve tens of thousands of people. TRAC identified more than 47,000 cases in the first nine months of the current fiscal year alone.

Mr. Arthur said he expects Congress and the Government Accountability Office to take an interest in the lapse.

“The only question that remains is whether this is nonfeasance or malfeasance,” he said.

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Remain in Mexico axed
« Reply #2584 on: August 10, 2022, 05:39:21 AM »
Trump-era ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy axed

BY STEPHEN DINAN THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Homeland Security Department announced it will end the Trump-era “Remain in Mexico” policy and welcome ousted illegal immigrants back into the U.S. after a federal court dissolved the last remaining hurdle.

Judge Matthew J. Kacsmaryk lifted his permanent injunction Monday after the Supreme Court ruled in late June that Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas did have power under the law to end the border security program, officially known as the Migrant Protection Protocols.

The department said it will immediately stop ousting people under MPP, and said the several thousands who had been ousted under the policy in recent months will be welcomed back when they show up for their next appointments — though they remain under threat of deportation.

“As Secretary Mayorkas has said, MPP has endemic flaws, imposes unjustifiable human costs, and pulls resources and personnel away from other priority efforts to secure our border,” the department said in a statement announcing the move.

Under MPP, some migrants caught jumping the southern border illegally who then requested asylum were pushed back into Mexico to wait for their immigration court hearings.

The policy’s goal was to deny them the foothold that has served as an enticement for an unprecedented flow of immigrants, and it proved strikingly successful for the Trump team.

But the Biden administration called the policy cruel and has pushed from its early days to end the program, along with most of the rest of the Trump administration’s get-tough immigration policies.

Judge Kacsmaryk, in his initial ruling, had said Congress laid out a framework that calls for illegal immigrants to be detained or released under rare circumstances. In cases in which neither of those was possible, he said the law required they be returned to Mexico.

An appeals court backed Judge Kacsmaryk, but the Supreme Court disagreed in a 5-4 ruling led by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.

He said Congress made return of the immigrants to Mexico optional, and the Biden administration has more leeway to decide how to treat those jumping the border.

Since Judge Kacsmaryk’s original ruling last year, the Biden administration has put about 5,000 immigrants into MPP, according to the latest numbers through June 30.

Nearly 70,000 people were put into MPP during the Trump years.

Denied quick entry, many of those gave up their interest in reaching the U.S. and returned home or remained in Mexico. Others tried to sneak back into the U.S. again.

Few actually won their claims, with the American Immigration Council saying the success rate was about 1%.

The Trump administration saw the low rate of success as an indicator that most of the people had bogus claims to begin with.

Immigrant-rights activists, though, blamed lack of lawyers, bureaucratic complications and unsafe conditions in Mexico for making it tough for migrants to show up for their hearings and to make their arguments.

After Homeland Security’s announcement, activists urged the Biden administration to move quickly to bring the ousted migrants back.

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WT: Biden ends ICE worker union protection
« Reply #2585 on: August 12, 2022, 04:48:16 AM »
Biden team ends ICE workers’ union protection

Council whistleblowers at risk of losing jobs

BY STEPHEN DINAN THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Biden administration delivered a death sentence Thursday to the labor organization that represents thousands of employees at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The Federal Labor Relations Authority’s decision erases the National ICE Council and leaves its 7,600 members, mostly deportation officers, without a collective bargaining agreement or union representation, members said.

The move also dents a prominent critic of both the administration and the American Federation of Government Employees, the umbrella union that included the ICE Council.

AFGE moved to “disclaim” the ICE employees this summer after the council filed a complaint claiming gross mismanagement and hostile intentions at AFGE. AFGE President Everett Kelley said the ICE Council wasn’t a good partner in the labor movement.

FLRA Regional Director Jessica S. Bartlett agreed to AFGE’s request in a decision Thursday, saying that ICE also sided with AFGE in its battle to ax the council.

“Based on AFGE’s disclaimer of interest, I find that it is appropriate to revoke the certification for the unit of non-professional employees,” Ms. Bartlett wrote in her decision.

Chris Crane, president of the council, said the government colluded with AFGE to silence the organization and its members.

“There is no doubt that ICE and DHS leadership worked in unison with corrupt union bosses to make

this happen,” he said. “DHS and AFGE leadership both wanted desperately to silence ICE Council whistleblowers. Without a union, it’s doubtful those whistleblowers will have jobs much longer.”

He also called the FLRA’s decision “the largest single act of whistleblower retaliation in United States history” by depriving union members of their representation.

“We did what we were supposed to do. We reported to the Department of Labor that union bosses at AFGE were allegedly spending dues money on prostitutes and strippers, sexually assaulting their own employees, engaging in payoffs and coverups, and other unlawful and egregious acts. It was supposed to be investigated. We were supposed to be protected,” he said.

He added: “Federal employees must be alerted immediately that they have no protection from corrupt unions when reporting allegations to the Department of Labor. This can’t happen again.”

Neither AFGE nor ICE responded to requests for comment Thursday.

When it filed to oust the ICE employees’ union last month, AFGE blamed the employees for the bad blood and characterized the disclaimer as acceding to the council’s wishes.

“It is clear that the AFGE Council 118 remains steadfast in their desire to no longer be a part of AFGE or the broader labor movement,” Mr. Kelley said. “As a result, we have made the difficult decision to disclaim interest in this unit. While we had hoped to avoid this outcome, today’s action begins the process of granting Council 118’s request.”

The council had sought independence. Instead, AFGE’s disclaimer abolishes the council and leaves its members back at the starting point.

They must now go through a new organization drive and renegotiate a collective bargaining agreement.

The council has long been critical of the direction of activities at ICE, including playing a key role in sinking nominees to lead the agency in both the Trump and Biden administrations.

ICE officers also have battled Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas over his attempts to refashion the agency and its mission. Just before the end of the Trump administration, the ICE Council signed a controversial agreement with the Department of Homeland Security giving the union chapter a say in policy changes that the Biden team wanted to make. The new administration “disapproved” of the agreement.

The ICE Council has battled AFGE. It argues that the 700,000-member union doesn’t deliver good service to its members and takes stances that are hostile to the members. That includes backing politicians who have called for abolishing ICE, which could effectively end the members’ jobs.

Beyond those service complaints, the ICE Council has claimed serious management issues at AFGE, including in a complaint filed with the Labor Department asking for an investigation.

The complaint, first reported by The Washington Times in June, cited accusations that AFGE leaders used union money to hush up claims of racial discrimination and sexual harassment and used union dues to pay for “strip clubs” and “pursuing prostitutes.”

In filing their complaint, ICE Council officials sought whistleblower protections, fearing retaliation. Weeks later, AFGE filed its notice of disclaimer asking that the council be dissolved.

Rep. Michael Cloud, Texas Republican, said that appeared to be just the sort of retaliation that worried the council.

He sent a letter late last month asking the Labor Department to investigate AFGE.

Mr. Cloud also asked AFGE to defend itself against the council’s accusations of mismanagement.

The FLRA didn’t give the ICE council a say in its fate. The authority said the two parties involved were AFGE and the Homeland Security Department — specifically ICE.

Mr. Crane said the agency’s decision allowed AFGE to get away with retaliation.

“The FLRA absolutely knew this was whistleblower retaliation, but purposely prohibited the evidence from being introduced. They need to be investigated immediately. This investigation is a complete sham,” he said.

The FLRA did not respond to a request for comment on the process.


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Homeland Security, Border Protection hypocrisy
« Reply #2587 on: August 24, 2022, 07:58:56 AM »
5 million untested, mostly unvaccinated, came across our southern border since Biden took office, but world no. 1 and Wimbledon champion Novak Djokavic cannot play the US Open because of his vaccination status?  What a (bad) joke.

https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/sports/djokovic-missing-us-open-over-covid-vaccine-status-would-be-a-joke-mcenroe-2022-08-24/

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/us-mexico-border/2022/08/21/id/1083970/

Banana Republic.
A banana republic is a country with an economy of state capitalism, whereby the country is operated as a private commercial enterprise for the exclusive profit of the ruling class. Such exploitation is enabled by collusion between the state and favored economic monopolies, in which the profit, derived from the private exploitation of public lands, is private property, while the debts incurred thereby are the financial responsibility of the public treasury.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana_republic

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WT: Bill with a good idea
« Reply #2588 on: August 26, 2022, 06:00:34 AM »
IMMIGRATION

Bill would punish China for refusing to take back deportees

Republican’s bill cuts off ability to travel to U.S.

BY STEPHEN DINAN THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Fed up with countries refusing to take back their own citizens the U.S. is trying to deport, a Republican congressman on Thursday announced new legislation that could cut off those countries’ ability to travel to the U.S.

Rep. Tom Tiffany, Wisconsin Republican, said he was spurred by China’s recent announcement that it would refuse to cooperate with deportations as retaliation for American engagement with Taiwan.

“For years, Beijing has impeded our ability to send their criminal aliens home — effectively treating our country as a dumping ground for their nationals who break American laws,” Mr. Tiffany said. “It makes no sense to continue granting visas to citizens of Communist China knowing that we may never be able to remove them should they overstay or commit crimes in our communities.”

U.S. law already gives the administration discretion to cut off visas, but presidents have been reluctant to flex the power.

Mr. Tiffany’s bill would remove some of the discretion by requiring that when the administration does impose visa sanctions, it go after both nonimmigrant visitor visas and full immigrant visas.

While China is a chief target, it is not the only offender.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement keeps a list of countries it seems “recalcitrant” in cooperating on deportations. As of June 2020, there were a dozen countries on it, according to the Congressional Research Service: Cuba, Russia, Iraq, Iran, Burundi, Eritrea, Pakistan, India, Cambodia, Laos, Bhutan and China.

ICE has not answered repeated inquiries from The Washington Times over the last year seeking an updated list.

Under Section 243(d) of immigration law, the Homeland Security secretary has the power to trigger visa sanctions on recalcitrant countries. If the secretary sends a notice to the State Department, the secretary of state is required to impose sanctions.

But since it is a discretionary power, not all countries deemed recalcitrant are under sanctions.

The administration also can choose what sort of sanctions to level.

They can range from a full ban on all visas to restrictions on particular categories and people. One common sanction is a ban on short-term “nonimmigrant” tourism or business visas for members of a government and their families.

Mr. Tiffany’s bill would mandate the suspension of both immigrant and nonimmigrant visas.

Homeland Security officials have said that labeling a country “recalcitrant” is a bit of an art.

China, however, removed all doubt about its status earlier this summer when it announced it would no longer cooperate on deportations. That was one of the retaliatory steps Beijing announced after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi visited Taiwan, defying China’s wishes.

ICE’s website currently lists eight countries under visa sanctions: Cambodia, Eritrea, Sierra Leone, Burma, Laos, Cuba, Pakistan and China.

ICE does not detail the level of sanctions imposed on each, but notes that the sanctions on Sierra Leone and Laos used to be stiffer but have been trimmed.

When countries refuse to cooperate on deportations it can mean the U.S. government has to release illegal immigrants with serious criminal records out onto the streets.

In 2015, ICE provided statistics to Congress showing that in the previous year it had released nearly 2,500 migrants with criminal records because it was unable to get cooperation on deporting them.

Cuba, Vietnam and China were the biggest offenders in that data.

The George W. Bush administration used Section 243(d) sanctions only once, against Guyana, in 2001. The Obama administration used them against The Gambia in 2016. The Trump administration was more willing to use the power, deploying it against Cambodia, Eritrea, Guinea and Sierra Leone in 2017; against Burma and Laos in 2018; against Cuba, Ghana and Pakistan in 2019; and against Burundi, China and Ethiopia in 2020.


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Border surge Biden's fault
« Reply #2590 on: August 31, 2022, 10:57:49 AM »

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9 migrants die trying to cross swift Texas river
« Reply #2591 on: September 04, 2022, 07:56:30 AM »
https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/border-patrol-migrants-found-dead-rio-grande-texas-89267125

My question: 

How can the river current in Texas be swift and dangerous when Lakes Mead and Powell are dry due to global climate change?

Also, former President Trump offered to build a big, beautiful gate.  Nobody has drowned coming in legally.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2022, 07:58:59 AM by DougMacG »

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Re: 9 migrants die trying to cross swift Texas river
« Reply #2592 on: September 04, 2022, 08:11:18 AM »
Texas rivers are racist!

Expecting people to obey the law is racist as well.


https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/border-patrol-migrants-found-dead-rio-grande-texas-89267125

My question: 

How can the river current in Texas be swift and dangerous when Lakes Mead and Powell are dry due to global climate change?

Also, former President Trump offered to build a big, beautiful gate.  Nobody has drowned coming in legally.

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2593 on: September 04, 2022, 08:54:57 AM »
"Nobody has drowned coming in legally."



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WSJ: NY Immigration Court grants 75%?!?
« Reply #2596 on: September 16, 2022, 01:58:29 PM »
Migrant Busing Brings the Border Crisis to Sanctuary Cities
Not all are dispatched by Gov. Abbott. The federal government is sending them too.
By Carine Hajjar
Sept. 16, 2022 2:06 pm ET

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New York Immigrant Affairs Commissioner Manuel Castro high-fives a child as a group of migrants arrive in New York City, Aug. 25.
PHOTO: YUKI IWAMURA/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

New York

It was 6 a.m., and the buses from Texas had yet to arrive. But a handful of ambulances and policemen already waited on the street. An hour later, empty buses from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority would line up to transport migrants across New York City. Volunteers unloaded boxes into the makeshift “triage center” inside the lobby of the Port Authority bus terminal. Manuel Castro, Mayor Eric Adams’s commissioner for immigrant affairs, and Rep. Adriano Espaillat, whose district spans Upper Manhattan and part of the Bronx, arrived before 7. At around 8, 80 asylum-seeking migrants filed out of the two buses arriving from the Lone Star State, one sent by Mr. Abbott from the border and another by the city of El Paso. Messrs. Castro and Espaillat shook everyone’s hand, saying: “Bienvenidos a Nueva York.”

Since early August, Gov. Greg Abbott has been sending bus loads of asylum-seekers from the Texas border to sanctuary cities—New York, Chicago, Washington and other places that have policies discouraging local law enforcement from cooperating with federal authorities in enforcing immigration law. This week Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis one-upped Mr. Abbott by sending a small plane full of Venezuelan migrants to Martha’s Vineyard, Mass.

New York is struggling to provide medical care and shelter for migrants in keeping with its sanctuary policies and right-to-shelter mandate. Some New York hospitals have seen unexpected arrivals of migrants throughout the summer, challenging already burdened staff. “Everyone is on board with wanting to help, but we don’t have the staff,” one doctor from a New York public hospital says. “The buses are coming unexpectedly, so there could be a wave of patients in the emergency room with complex medical and social needs that need to be triaged on top of the patients that are already there.”

Housing the migrants is even more complicated, despite the city’s best efforts. Shelter vacancy rates in June were under 1%, far below the city’s 5% target. On Aug. 1, Mr. Adams made an emergency procurement declaration to provide housing for asylum seekers. It included a “conservative estimate” that some 4,000 migrants had entered the shelter system since May, noting that the city doesn’t track their immigration status. Today, the city reckons that number is closer to 9,800, of which 7,300 are still housed in New York City shelters. Mr. Adams has opened 20 more emergency shelters, some in hotels, amid the surge of asylum seekers. Washington, another sanctuary city, faces similar challenges. Its mayor, Muriel Bowser, and Mr. Adams have both asked the Federal Emergency Management Agency for help.

The objective of Mr. Abbott’s stunt is to push sanctuary-city Democrats into demanding action from the White House on the border crisis. They’re resisting. Mr. Adams has called Mr. Abbott’s actions “horrific.” At the Port Authority, Messrs. Espaillat’s and Castro’s words of welcome soon turned to denunciations of Mr. Abbott for causing a “circus,” as Mr. Espaillat put it. “This is about a governor . . . that wants all of you to cover [for] him,” he said.

When I asked if the Biden administration is doing enough to create a safe and orderly border, Mr. Espaillat conceded that “much needs to be done at the border” but was quick to add that “this is complicated by the arbitrary behavior of Gov. Abbott.” Mr. Castro’s staff reported getting less than 24 hours’ notice before now-daily bus arrivals.

Yet not all the arriving vehicles are “Abbott buses.” The White House calls Mr. Abbott’s busing “shameful,” but the Biden administration appears to be doing the same thing. Mr. Adams has said that buses are sent by the federal government as well as the state. The city of El Paso, which has a Democratic mayor, is chartering buses separate from Mr. Abbott’s operations and soliciting reimbursements from FEMA, according to the Texas Tribune.


Claims of Mr. Abbott’s “human trafficking,” as Mr. Espaillat describes it, are overblown. New York City has more social services than El Paso or Del Rio. It offers better chances for asylum, too. In fiscal 2021, the New York immigration court granted 3 of every 4 asylum claims. Houston’s granted less than 1 in 20.

The true culprits are in Washington, not Austin. Congress hasn’t enacted meaningful reform to accommodate more legal immigration or stabilize the border, and the federal executive branch has fallen down on the job of administering existing law at the border and elsewhere.

From the humanitarian to the economic, welcoming migrants is beneficial, but our current immigration system isn’t built to accommodate the present number of asylum claims. Since the start of fiscal 2022 last Oct. 1, there have been more than 1.9 million migrant encounters at the southern border, already exceeding the number of encounters for all of fiscal 2021 by more than 200,000. Of these, 47.5% were expelled under Title 42, a Trump-era anti-Covid policy, though many try again. The rest are likely to apply for asylum.

The consequences of disorderly policy reach bottom to top. As Customs and Border Protection agents process increasing numbers of asylum seekers, they’re diverted from the field, leaving the border porous to smugglers and cartels and decreasing security for local communities. The system is especially dangerous for migrants. Nearly 750 have died at the border, many drowning or otherwise succumbing to the elements, in fiscal 2022, up 200 from last year.

The dysfunction is also evident in immigration-court backlogs. According to Syracuse University, asylum seekers across the country wait an average of 810 days for an initial hearing. The average tops 900 days in New York state and 1,100 in New York City.

That means New York’s obligations will multiply. After Messrs. Castro and Espaillat concluded their remarks, volunteers told me that three more buses were expected to arrive at noon, breaking a daily record for arrivals. This will be the norm until Washington can manage the crisis at the border. Forcing the issue is in Mr. Adams’s interests, even if he doesn’t like the way Mr. Abbott is doing it.

Ms. Hajjar is the Journal’s Joseph Rago Memorial Fellow.

DougMacG

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2597 on: September 19, 2022, 01:08:20 AM »
 :https://justthenews.com/government/congress/rep-nehls-says-homeland-security-confirmed-venezuela-sends-violent-criminals-us?utm_source=sf&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=twjs

Hard to title this anything other than, Trump was right.


Crafty_Dog

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Re: Homeland Security, Border Protection, and American Freedom
« Reply #2599 on: September 19, 2022, 10:42:30 AM »
Venezuelan "Scarfaces"!