Author Topic: Law Enforcement  (Read 40302 times)

Crafty_Dog

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Forgiveness
« Reply #50 on: July 12, 2016, 05:05:28 PM »

Crafty_Dog

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Who was the bailiff/sheriff who gave up the gun?
« Reply #51 on: July 13, 2016, 12:17:11 PM »
Saw reports of two bailiffs being shot (to death) with a gun taken off another bailiff or sheriff.  The way the reports were worded left me wondering if they were covering up that the officer who gave up the gun was a small female.  This would not be the time that such was the case.

DougMacG

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More on the MN shooting
« Reply #52 on: July 13, 2016, 12:36:07 PM »
The officer said on the police radio that the driver looked like an armed robbery suspect, not a taillight offender.  Facts leak out so slowly.  

A BOLO (Be On Look Out) alert was issuedTuesday July 5th.  Philando Castile was pulled over on July 6th in the same vicinity.

From the radio dispatch of Officer Jeronimo Yanez:

“I’m going to stop a car. I’m going to check IDs.  I have reason to pull it over.”

“The two occupants just look like people that were involved in a robbery. The driver looks more like one of our suspects, just ‘cause of the wide set nose.”

http://www.startribune.com/police-audio-officer-stopped-philando-castile-on-robbery-suspicion/386344001/#1

Maybe our Governor was right.  If he was white he wouldn't have looked like the armed robbery suspect.

Philando Castile has been pulled over at least 52 times in the last 14 years, issued 86 citations and assessed 6,588 in fines.  (This doesn't have anything to do with shooting him, but indicates he doesn't follow instructions well, like don't reach for your gun.)

Philando Castile had a permit.
http://www.fox9.com/news/173548963-story
This actually indicates he probably wasn't the armed robbery perp.  CCW permit holders don't do that.  But it puts the cops on edge knowing he may have a gun within reach.  MN cops know they are dealing with a permit holder when they walk up to a vehicle assuming the vehicle plates were his.

We don't know the whole story of this is at this point, nor do any of the protesters.  In fact we don't know ANTHING about the 103 seconds that led to the officer drawing, warning and shooting.  I said earlier, I don't know how you justify shooting four times, but we don't know that he did.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2016, 06:45:48 PM by Crafty_Dog »

objectivist1

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Obama's Obscene Exploitation of Dallas Police Murders...
« Reply #53 on: July 13, 2016, 01:18:45 PM »
Obama’s Obscene Exploitation of the Dallas Massacre

Exploiting dead police officers to promote #BlackLivesMatter.

July 13, 2016
Daniel Greenfield

In Dallas, Obama mentioned the name of dead sex offender Alton Sterling more times than those of the murdered police officers whom he was pretending to memorialize. After quickly dispensing with the formalities of eulogizing the slain officers, Obama demanded that “even those who dislike the phrase ‘black lives matter’” should “be able to hear the pain of Alton Sterling’s family”.

Alton Sterling was a convicted sex offender, burglar and violent criminal who was shot while reaching for a gun. His family may mourn him, just as every criminal’s family mourns their own, but it was obscene to class him together with five police officers who were murdered by a violent racist while doing their duty.

It is even more obscene when Obama’s favorite sex offender displaces the murdered police officers.

And yet that was Obama’s theme in Dallas. Murdered police officers were contrasted with dead criminals. The proper thing for Americans to do, as Obama told us, was to mourn both officers and criminals, to respect the sacrifices of the police and the anti-police accusations of #BlackLivesMatter.

Obama did not come to Dallas to mourn the murdered police officers, but to defend the ideology that took their lives. And this is what he has done from the very beginning.

Before the shootings, Obama expressed his “condolences for the families of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile” and insisted that the criminal justice system was racist. His statements and speeches after the shootings echoed the same talking points and spin complete with the claims that accusing the police of racism is “not to be against law enforcement”. 

“When people say ‘Black Lives Matter,’ that doesn’t mean blue lives don’t matter”, he famously said.

That’s true. Black Lives Matter doesn’t mean that blue lives don’t matter. It means that blue lives are evil. As Ta-Nehisi Coates, an author on Obama’s reading list, wrote of the dead police officers who gave their lives on September 11, “They were not human to me.” That’s the kindest thing that the black nationalists whose cause Obama has championed have said of the police.

In a more recent article titled, “The Near Certainty of Anti-Police Violence”, the MacArthur Genius Grant recipient and son of a Black Panther suggests that black resentment of police makes their murder predictable.

“Sanctimonious cries of nonviolence will not help,” Coates writes. “The extent to which we are tolerant of the possibility of more Walter Scotts and Freddie Grays is the extent to which we are tolerant of the possibility of more Micah Xavier Johnsons.”

It’s the core black nationalist message made more palatable for liberal audiences. Underneath the word games, the attempt to treat the ideological justifications for the mass murder of police as inevitable, is the same message delivered by Ismaaiyl Abdullah Brinsley, the #BlackLivesMatter supporter who assassinated two NYPD officers, who had posted, “They take 1 of ours…Let’s take 2 of theirs”.

Obama’s message was even more polished than Coates, but not really so very different. Coates had polished up the radical black nationalist message for liberal audiences. Obama’s speechwriters shaped his for a national audience. But underneath the religiosity and praise of the police was sheer contempt.

In one of the nastily cynical moments, Obama claimed that “to honor these five outstanding officers who we lost” we would have to act on “uncomfortable” truths such as his claim that the police are racist. “Insisting we do better to root out racial bias is not an attack on cops, but an effort to live up to our highest ideals,” he spun.

While the media applauded his “healing”, Obama was just recycling his speeches from before the Dallas shooting. The talking points had not changed. They had only been moved around a little to exploit the police officers murdered by a #BlackLivesMatter supporter in order to promote #BlackLivesMatter.

Indeed this had always been Obama’s first and foremost priority.

After the shooting, his initial response was to emphasize that the anti-police protests were “peaceful”. At Dallas, in his praise of the police officers, he insisted on inserting that same description of a “peaceful” protest “in response to the killing of Alton Sterling of Baton Rouge and Philando Castile of Minnesota”. The choice of words, ‘killing’ rather than ‘death’, is significant.

The “shootings in Minnesota and Baton Rouge” were equated with the murders of police officers in Dallas in a breathtaking bit of moral equivalence. Americans were encouraged to grieve for sex offender Alton Sterling and the murdered police officers at the same time. And, just in case there was any ambiguity about which side he was on, Obama warned that “we cannot simply turn away and dismiss those in peaceful protest as troublemakers or paranoid.”

It was a defense of #BlackLivesMatter at a memorial for their victims.

Obama’s spin was that he was calling for unity when in reality he was pushing the divisive agenda of the hate group whose rhetoric helped lead to the killings. He was not a healer, but an arsonist.

There was nothing unifying about his exploitation of a memorial service to push anti-cop messages or to call for gun control. Neither message is in any way, shape or form unifying. They are as divisive as can be.

Obama did not come to Dallas to mourn, to heal or to unify. His sole purpose was to protect his #BlackLivesMatter hate group from the consequences of its rhetoric. Americans were fed lies about peaceful protests featuring armed members of hate groups who had called for the murder of police.

#BlackLivesMatter draws its inspiration from a cop-killer. It has deliberately targeted white people in much the same fashion that Micah X. Johnson did. The only real difference between Johnson and the black nationalist hate groups frantically trying to distance themselves from him in much the same way that mosques do from the latest Islamic terrorist is that he followed through on a lot of their rhetoric.

Johnson was not trying to get a job writing Black Panther comics or making YouTube videos. He actually did the sort of thing that #BlackLivesMatter role models like Assata Shakur did. He killed police officers.

For Obama, Dallas was a bump in the black nationalist road. It was, like every Islamic terrorist attack, an unfortunate incident from which we shouldn’t draw any conclusions, except perhaps that guns are bad. The goal is to redirect our attention to the next set of #BlackLivesMatter protests or the next celebrity tweeting about gun control and how mean those men with guns who aren’t on their payroll are.

He did not come to Dallas to praise the dead, but to enlist them in the service of his anti-police agenda.

Not only had Obama’s actions led to the murder of police officers, but he was determined to whitewash their deaths and exploit them as weapons in his war against the police.
"You have enemies?  Good.  That means that you have stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #54 on: July 13, 2016, 06:47:50 PM »
"Philando Castile has been pulled over at least 52 times in the last 14 years, issued 86 citations and assessed 6,588 in fines.  (This doesn't have anything to do with shooting him, but indicates he doesn't follow instructions well, like don't reach for your gun.)"

Citation?

DougMacG

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #55 on: July 13, 2016, 09:09:53 PM »
"Philando Castile has been pulled over at least 52 times in the last 14 years, issued 86 citations and assessed 6,588 in fines.  (This doesn't have anything to do with shooting him, but indicates he doesn't follow instructions well, like don't reach for your gun.)"

Citation?

Sorry, I missed this link in my post:
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/philando-castile-stopped-cops-52-times-14-years-article-1.2705348

Crafty_Dog

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« Last Edit: July 14, 2016, 08:08:55 AM by Crafty_Dog »

DougMacG

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Re: Sowell reviews "The War on Cops"
« Reply #57 on: July 14, 2016, 08:14:25 AM »
http://www.nationalreview.com/article/437703/the-war-on-cops-racism-allegations-are-largely-non-factual?utm_source=NR&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=July13Sowell

As usual, don't we wish people would come across these facts and this level of analysis without having to read an opinion piece of a conservative columnist on a conservative site.  The people who need to see this aren't seeing it.

"Although many people regard these “disparate-impact” statistics as evidence, or virtually proof, of racial discrimination, suppose that I should tell you that black basketball players are penalized by NBA referees out of all proportion to the 13 percent that blacks are in the American population."   - Unfair!

"black political and community leaders, back in the 1980s, spearheaded the drive for more severe legal penalties against those who sold crack cocaine. Black congressman Charlie Rangel of Harlem was just one of those black leaders who urged these more severe penalties. So did the New York Times, the promoter of many crusades on the left."

   - Does anyone ever point that out?  No.  Except here.

"whites were turned down at nearly twice the rate that Asian Americans were turned down"

   - A fact that doesn't fit a narrative or agenda, therefore irrelevant.  If you keep looking for differences between groups, you will find them.  That rarely defines causation.

G M

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Re: Sowell reviews "The War on Cops"
« Reply #58 on: July 14, 2016, 08:17:40 AM »
The majority of humans on the planet are Han Chinese, yet they are vastly unrepresented in the NBA and the US prison system. Some sort of systemic discrimination, obviously.

http://www.nationalreview.com/article/437703/the-war-on-cops-racism-allegations-are-largely-non-factual?utm_source=NR&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=July13Sowell

As usual, don't we wish people would come across these facts and this level of analysis without having to read an opinion piece of a conservative columnist on a conservative site.  The people who need to see this aren't seeing it.

"Although many people regard these “disparate-impact” statistics as evidence, or virtually proof, of racial discrimination, suppose that I should tell you that black basketball players are penalized by NBA referees out of all proportion to the 13 percent that blacks are in the American population."   - Unfair!

"black political and community leaders, back in the 1980s, spearheaded the drive for more severe legal penalties against those who sold crack cocaine. Black congressman Charlie Rangel of Harlem was just one of those black leaders who urged these more severe penalties. So did the New York Times, the promoter of many crusades on the left."

   - Does anyone ever point that out?  No.  Except here.

"whites were turned down at nearly twice the rate that Asian Americans were turned down"

   - A fact that doesn't fit a narrative or agenda, therefore irrelevant.  If you keep looking for differences between groups, you will find them.  That rarely defines causation.

ccp

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #59 on: July 14, 2016, 08:57:37 AM »
"The majority of humans on the planet are Han Chinese, yet they are vastly unrepresented in the NBA and the US prison system. Some sort of systemic discrimination, obviously."

But Hans absolutely do discriminate against other groups in China.  Ask the Tibetans or the Muslims in Western China.

DougMacG

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Re: Sowell reviews "The War on Cops"
« Reply #60 on: July 14, 2016, 09:28:44 AM »
"The majority of humans on the planet are Han Chinese, yet they are vastly unrepresented in the NBA and the US prison system. Some sort of systemic discrimination, obviously."

How come the Gullibles fall for the SJW drivel so easily?

Even Obama admits, if you grow up in fatherless house, you are 5 times more likely to commit crimes.
A black kid has a 72% of being born into a fatherless home.  Not a hit by lightning chance, a 3 out of 4 chance.
Government took the place of fathers.
Result: Too any black kids, boys in particular, turn to crime and end up in prison.
Leftist Answer:  Double down on same strategy and make it worse.  Then blame anyone who questions that.

To the Gullibles:  Do you know this is what you keep voting for?

To the opponents of government-run families and failed communities:  Hello... Is anyone home?
-------------------------------------------------
We’re hiring,” the [Dallas] police chief said. “Get out of the protest line and fill out an application.”
http://nypost.com/2016/07/11/dallas-police-chief-asks-protesters-to-join-cops/

ccp

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #61 on: July 14, 2016, 09:34:22 AM »
"We’re hiring,” the [Dallas] police chief said. “Get out of the protest line and fill out an application.”
http://nypost.com/2016/07/11/dallas-police-chief-asks-protesters-to-join-cops/"

Great line.  This guy *showed up* the community organizer imho.  He made the CIC look petty as he is.


G M

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Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Trey Gowdy on a rampage
« Reply #67 on: August 27, 2016, 10:53:08 PM »

ccp

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Something is missing from story
« Reply #68 on: September 21, 2016, 04:46:00 AM »
Something this guy said or was doing made several officers draw tasers and guns.
All these incidents have the same MO.  A black does NOT listen to police orders and then gets shot.   Sometimes shooting seems justified sometimes it seems not really.   Easy to say when watching safely at home and IN RETROSPECT.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/video-shows-tulsa-man-had-hands-police-shooting-061024866.html

Does anyone want to bet that Obama will comment on this soon as well as the vote slut.

ccp

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Higher proportion of Blacks being shot
« Reply #69 on: September 21, 2016, 06:52:40 PM »
And much higher proportion doing the killing.

"It’s the message that police have always been sending black Americans. Blacks make up about 13% of the US population, and yet accounted for 27% of the approximately 1,146 people killed by police in 2015."

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/sep/21/charlotte-police-killing-protests-america-law-enforcement-today

I don't know how one can "de link" the above from this:

https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2013/crime-in-the-u.s.-2013/offenses-known-to-law-enforcement/expanded-homicide/expanded_homicide_data_table_6_murder_race_and_sex_of_vicitm_by_race_and_sex_of_offender_2013.xls

G M

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Re: Higher proportion of Blacks being shot
« Reply #70 on: September 21, 2016, 07:36:55 PM »
Roughly 50% of ALL US murders are committed by young black males. Without those in the US stats, we would have a lower murder rate than Canada.


And much higher proportion doing the killing.

"It’s the message that police have always been sending black Americans. Blacks make up about 13% of the US population, and yet accounted for 27% of the approximately 1,146 people killed by police in 2015."

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/sep/21/charlotte-police-killing-protests-america-law-enforcement-today

I don't know how one can "de link" the above from this:

https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2013/crime-in-the-u.s.-2013/offenses-known-to-law-enforcement/expanded-homicide/expanded_homicide_data_table_6_murder_race_and_sex_of_vicitm_by_race_and_sex_of_offender_2013.xls

objectivist1

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Keith Lamont Scott was scum...
« Reply #71 on: September 23, 2016, 12:04:24 PM »
Protest Thugs and the Real Evil in Charlotte

Nothing says “family man” like assaulting women and children.

September 23, 2016

Daniel Greenfield - Frontpagemag.com


Keith Lamont Scott was scum.

He had been convicted of assault with a deadly weapon in two different states and convicted of assault in three states. He had been hit with “assault with intent to kill” charges in the 90s. His record of virtue included “assault on a child under 12” and “assault on a female.”

The media spin; “Family and neighbors call Scott a quiet ‘family man.’”

Nothing says “quiet” like “assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill” and nothing says “family man” like assaulting women and children.

Keith Lamont Scott, the latest martyr of Black Lives Matter and its media propaganda corps, was shot while waving a gun around. He had spent 7 years in jail for “aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.”

This vicious monster’s career of crime ended when he was shot by Brentley Vinson, an African-American police officer, protecting himself from the latest rampage by this “quiet family man.”

Brentley Vinson is everything that Scott isn’t. The son of a police officer, Brentley dreamed of following in his father’s footsteps. He used to organize his football team’s bible studies and mentored younger players. Former teammates describe him as a “great guy” with “good morals.” His former coach calls him a “natural leader” and says that, “We need more Brent Vinsons… in our communities.”

Except that Obama, Black Lives Matter, the media, the NAACP and everyone else going after this bright and decent African-American officer has decided that what we really need are more Keith Lamont Scotts. And the streets of Charlotte are full of “Scotts” throwing rocks at police, assaulting reporters and wrecking everything in sight in marches that are as “peaceful” as Scott was a “quiet family man.”

That’s what Hillary Clinton wanted when she tweeted that, “We have two names to add to a long list of African-Americans killed by police officers. It’s unbearable, and it needs to become intolerable.”

What exactly should be intolerable? An African-American police officer defending his life against a violent criminal who happened to be black? Should black criminals enjoy a special immunity? The greatest victims of black criminals are black communities.

Whom does Hillary Clinton imagine she’s helping here? Instead of standing with heroic African-American police officers like Vinson, she’s championing criminal scum like Scott.

Tim Kaine, Hillary’s No. 2, wants us to think about Scott’s family. We should do that. Scott’s brother announced on camera that all “white people” are “devils.” Timmy should check to see if he can get an exemption from white devildom.  But if there are any white devils, it’s men like Kaine and women like Hillary who enable the worst behavior in a troubled community while punishing those who try to help.

Every time the lie about “peaceful” protests is repeated, another black community becomes unlivable.

Twenty police officers have been injured and National Guard troops have arrived to deal with all those “peaceful” protests. Protesters chanted, “Black Lives Matter” and “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” before throwing things at police and then peacefully shooting each other. Stores had their windows broken and decorated with Black Lives Matter graffiti. A Walmart was peacefully looted and trucks were torched.

A police officer was peacefully hit by a car. Another was peacefully hit in the face with a rock. Mobs besieged and attempted to break into hotels. Reporters were attacked and a photographer was nearly thrown into a fire. White people were targeted by the racist Black Lives Matter mob and assaulted.

But all these peaceful rioters are probably just quiet family men too.

The peaceful protests are as big a lie as the “bookish” Keith Lamont Scott reading a book in his car. Police had no trouble finding a gun. They couldn’t have found Scott anywhere near a book. The only thing he could have done with a book is try to beat someone to death with it. Maybe a child.

Scott wasn’t a quiet family man; he was a violent criminal with a horrifying vicious streak. He and the rest of the Black Lives Matter rioters remind us of the monsters that we need dedicated police officers to protect us from.

The spin on what happened between a deranged black criminal and a courageous black police officer fell apart as fast as the Freddie Gray case, where black police officers were targeted and a city terrorized over conspiracy theories relating to the accidental death of a drug dealer.

The claims of racism are absurd. Not only was Scott shot by an African-American police officer, but Charlotte Police Chief Kerr Putney, who has taken the lead in defending him, is also African-American.

Are we supposed to believe that an African-American police officer and an African-American police chief are racists or that these two black men took the lead in a genocidal conspiracy to kill black men?

That’s the laughable premise of the racist Black Lives Matter hatefest that alternates between “Stop killing us” street theater and violent assaults on police officers, reporters and anyone in the area.

But the truth doesn’t matter. Black Lives Matter rioters are still chanting, “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” long after the Michael Brown lie fell apart. They’re holding up signs reading, “It Was a Book.”  The lie is backed by some of the biggest media corporations in the country, by $130 million from George Soros and the Ford Foundation, by Barack Hussein Obama and by Hillary Clinton.

These are the malign forces destroying Charlotte, as they trashed Baltimore. On the ground there are the vulture community organizers of Black Lives Matter, funded by the left, who parachute in to organize race riots, behind them are the reporters who sell the spin live on the air and the photographers who capture glamor shots of the racist rioters, and after them come the lawyers of the DOJ out to ruin, terrorize and intimidate whatever law enforcement survived the riots.

They did it in Ferguson and a dozen other places. Now they want to do it in Charlotte.

They want to do it because they hate white people and black people. They hate peace and decency. They hate the idea of people getting up in the morning and working for a living. They hate the idea of good officers, white and black men and women, like Brentley Vinson, who genuinely believe in doing the right thing. They want unearned power. They demand unearned wealth. And they thrive on destruction.

This is the real evil in Charlotte. And we need to stand up to it. From the ghetto to the manors of the liberal elite from burning cars to pricey restaurants in exclusive neighborhoods, it plots against us.

It is a lie repeated a million times. Sometimes the lie is simple. Other times it’s sophisticated. But the way to fight it is to begin with the truth.

The truth is that Keith Lamont Scott was a violent criminal who came to a bad end because of his own actions. Just like Michael Brown, Freddie Gray and too many other Black Lives Matter martyrs to count.

The truth is that everything Black Lives Matter does reminds us of why we need police officers.

The truth is that this is not about race, but about those who want to build and those who want to destroy. It’s about the difference between Brentley Vinson and Keith Lamont Scott.

It’s about what kind of country we want to be. Is it a country that celebrates a young black football player who chose to follow in his father’s footsteps, who organized bible study and helped others, who risked his life to keep other people safe. Or is it one that celebrates Keith Lamont Scott, who assaulted a woman, a child and anyone else he could get at, who terrorized three states and died as he lived.

Obama and the left want a nation of Keith Lamont Scotts. But now it’s our turn to choose.
"You have enemies?  Good.  That means that you have stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill.

Crafty_Dog

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G M

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ccp

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #75 on: September 26, 2016, 01:04:08 PM »
This should shame someone.  Some may actually find this a badge of courage.  :-P

DDF

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #76 on: September 26, 2016, 01:46:05 PM »
 :-o

That's going to leave a heck of a mark if they ever decide to get a job.

ccp

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So why DID he die?
« Reply #77 on: November 16, 2016, 01:49:26 PM »
The LEFT :  crazy right wing conspiraciists claimeing it was a hit.  Yet it doesn't appear to be a robbery.  So young guy leaves bar and is shot to death for no reason? 
All hushed up:

http://www.newsweek.com/seth-rich-murder-dnc-hack-julian-assange-hillary-clinton-donald-trump-492084

ccp

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When all common sense goes out the window
« Reply #78 on: December 09, 2016, 05:38:24 AM »
The police officer is being criticized by some , including a family who ran out and  got an attorney for the boy who was waving knives around , for shooting the young man:
https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/2c4019ea-0988-37a8-ad49-97722d431a5b/video%3A-heated-debate-over.html

some will ask why did he not use taser.
(or how about a faser placed on stun like star trek)
why did he not lasoo the kid?
or use a sling shot?

why did he not tackle him?

perhaps offer him milk and cookies and a safe space?


ccp

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DougMacG

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« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 05:46:23 AM by DougMacG »

G M

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Re: Black LEO speaks, Officer Miosotis Familia killed
« Reply #83 on: July 14, 2017, 08:38:24 AM »
http://www.bizpacreview.com/2016/07/10/riveting-post-by-black-police-officer-confronts-blm-with-raw-honesty-and-every-american-needs-to-see-it-363067

I didn't know the police officer assassinated in the Bronx last week was black.  Black Lives Matter has gone full circle inciting the killing of their own.  Tragic.  This is no more wrong and no more insane than if she were white or anything else, but still amazingly stupid besides evil.

http://img.thedailybeast.com/image/upload/c_crop,d_placeholder_euli9k,h_1440,w_2560,x_0,y_0/dpr_2.0/c_limit,w_740/fl_lossy,q_auto/v1499281238/170705-daly-slain-cop-tease_v5amgh

http://www.thedailybeast.com/she-said-hello-to-officer-miosotis-familia-but-didnt-get-to-say-goodbye

They don't think black police officer's lives matter. All cops are targets for them.


ccp

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Bernard Kerik
« Reply #84 on: July 14, 2017, 06:19:13 PM »
Five Minutes With . . . Bernard Kerik
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Friday, 14 Jul 2017 11:51 AM

   

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Bernard Kerik's career in law enforcement has been a rollercoaster ride. He ran New York City’s jails, then served as the city’s police commissioner and, following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, President George W. Bush appointed him as interim minister of interior of Iraq. Kerik later served more than three years in federal prison for criminal conspiracy and tax fraud.

Now a law enforcement consultant and advocate for criminal justice reform, 61-year-old Kerik also has added author to his résumé with his memoir “From Jailer to Jailed: My Journey from Correction and Police Commissioner to Inmate #84888-054,” published by Threshold Editions.

Newsmax sat down with Kerik to talk cop dramas, highlights from his days on the force, and details on his newest "too hot for network television" endeavor.

Newsmax: You were police commissioner of New York City on 9/11. Twenty-three members of your department were killed that day. How did that change you as a person?


Bernard Kerik: Most importantly, it taught me to never take life for granted and that, in times of crisis and adversity, you can get through anything when you put your mind to it.

NM: Most Americans' perceptions of law enforcement are shaped by TV shows like “CSI,” “Law & Order,” and “Orange Is the New Black,” to name a few. How accurate are these shows? Which are your favorites?

BK: The stories on "Law & Order" are actually pulled from the New York City tabloids and dramatized for television, as are stories in "Blue Bloods" and some other police television series. Most are actually watered down for network viewing, so I’m not too big of a fan. I thought “Hill Street Blues” and “NYPD Blue” years ago gave a closer view of reality in the police world. “Orange Is the New Black,” although fictionalized for TV, clearly demonstrates many of the realistic flaws and failures in today’s criminal justice system. It’s one show that I wish every member of Congress watched to get a better idea of how we waste taxpayer dollars and destroy American lives needlessly.

NM: You’ve witnessed a lot of changes in law enforcement over the years. How have things changed under President Donald Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions?

BK: I think, for the first time in close to a decade, we now have a president and attorney general who sincerely care about the men and women in local, state, and federal law enforcement, which should motivate and inspire the law enforcement community, rather than demoralize them.


NM: We hear it on good authority that you’re writing a crime thriller and we can’t wait to read it. Can you give us some clues as to what it’s about?

BK: Look out "Blue Bloods"! A fictional New York City police commissioner gets personally involved in the hunt for an international terrorist determined to destroy New York City. Too hot for network television, but if you’re into good versus evil and the international intrigue of hunting down and killing those who want the demise of our country, I think you’ll love the book.

NM: Why did you become a cop in the first place?

BK: Cops are the “good guys,” and they have been since I can remember. I have a picture that’s in my first book, “The Lost Son,” where I’m about 3 years old. I’m wearing a cop's hat, a holster, and carrying a gun. When people ask when I started my career, I point to that photo and say, “I started pretty young.”

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NM: What book has had the most impact on your life?

BK: I can’t say that there’s one in particular over others, but Rudy Giuliani’s “Leadership,” President George W. Bush’s “Decision Points,” Elie Wiesel’s “Night,” and Randy Pausch’s “Last Lecture” are some of my favorites.

NM: You’ve seen a lot of bizarre things in policing over the years. Can you recall one of the weirdest moments of your police career?

BK: When a cop delivers a baby, it’s definitely not the norm, and there were four or five moms that delivered babies in a welfare hotel in Midtown back in the late '80s.

NM: What’s your idea of a perfect meal?

BK: Without going through an entire menu . . . picture a Thanksgiving dinner and throw in biscuits and cornbread and I’m happy.

NM: Are body cameras on cops a good idea?

BK: I think they are and, in due time, the cops and police unions will realize that the cops will be better off with them than without them.


NM: If you had not been a cop, what would have been your second career choice?

BK: I joined the U.S. Army when I was 18 years old. Had I not gone into law enforcement, I think I would have stayed in the military.

NM: What is a hobby of yours that people may be surprised at?

BK: Besides being involved in the martial arts for more than 40 years and lifting weights and working out, I have few hobbies. However, it has surprised many of my friends when they see a guitar case sitting in my office and I open it and there’s a Gibson 12 String Acoustic Guitar. I’ve played since I was a young boy, but the older I get, the less I play.

NM: And finally, Bernie, if Hollywood were to make a biopic based on your life, who would you want to play you – as a young man and in present day?

BK: Now, it would have to be my friend Sylvester Stallone. We’ve talked about this, and he told me that if anyone is going to do my life story, it’s got to be a mini-series because you can’t sum up my life in a two-hour movie. That said, as for someone playing me when I was young — who knows. It would probably be a combination of a young Jason Statham and Dominic Purcell.

Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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Law Enforcement - Derek Chauvin trial
« Reply #87 on: March 08, 2021, 08:02:24 AM »
Scott Johnson of Powerline is in the courtroom. Stay tuned.
https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2021/03/chauvin-pretrial-notes.php

Andy McCarthy had a column explaining the difference between murder and manslaughter.  I didn't post it because I thought I understood it better before I read his piece.

It strains rationality to think he killed him intentionally - while waiting for an ambulance.  It's not a proven fact that his knee hold killed him with so many other factors in play, fentanyl, methamphetamine, covid and underlying health conditions.  This is going to come down to courtroom presentations and of course to the jury.

Doxxing?  Do you think there is any chance the jury will forever remain anonymous if they acquit on the main charges?  Or should they rightfully fear for their lives, and thus decide accordingly?

Day One: Prosecution wants a delay.  There is an appeal pending over the previous Minneapolis cop murder/manslaughter trial.  Also, the Keith Ellison led prosecution knows that mob riot pressure is greater in summer.  Defense should waive right to speedy trial in exchange for a Nov 1 start date.

Note:  It was on this board that I learned the knee hold is a taught technique on the police force.  Easy to argue this was not the appropriate time to use it, but my guess is that 99.999% of the people watching the viral video did not know that can be used in situations where suspect is resisting - and the suspect was resisting.

My prediction:  This is not going to go well for anyone involved.

DougMacG

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Law Enforcement, George Floyd, fatal level of fentanyl, arteria 75% blocked
« Reply #88 on: April 01, 2021, 09:09:15 AM »
https://www.kare11.com/article/news/local/george-floyd/new-court-docs-say-george-floyd-had-fatal-level-of-fentanyl-in-his-system/89-ed69d09d-a9ec-481c-90fe-7acd4ead3d04
August 26, 2020
[Kare11 is NBC News in the Twin Cities]

11 nanograms per milliliter Fentanyl in his system  - Medical examiner

"If he were found dead at home alone this would be an acceptable [cause of death]."
"Deaths have been certified with levels of 3."  (This is almost 4 times higher.)

"At least one arteria was approximately 75% blocked."
---------------------------------------
Today:  Floyd's friend in the front seat pleads the 5th:
https://www.startribune.com/man-who-was-with-george-floyd-the-day-he-died-invokes-fifth-amendment-refuses-to-testify/600040810/

What?  His last and best friend doesn't want justice for George?  Did he provide the drugs, set him up with the fake $20?
---------------------------------------

But clearly the cause of death was systemic racism.

If the cause of death was the knee hold of the officer, perhaps it was the City's inadequate training and wrongful procedures at fault.  If so, did they admit guilt by paying out $25 million just prior to trial?

Does the activist prosecutor (Keith Ellison) who supports the riots want to lose the case in order to advance the cause?

Everything in this case screams reasonable doubt.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2021, 11:27:43 AM by DougMacG »

DougMacG

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Re: Law Enforcement, George Floyd trial
« Reply #89 on: April 12, 2021, 09:33:44 AM »
I am not watching the trial but can't avoid the reports.  The key issue is cause of death.   One thing I'm not hearing in the case is race.

We burned down the town and also places like Seattle and Portland over the idea that white cops set out to kill black victims every day and here we caught one on video.  Closer examination reveals Officer Chauvin was called to the scene because he resisted arrest and two less experienced, less capable officers were unable to restrain him.

We saw the 'knee on the neck' claim change to 'knee on the neck area', a subtle but important distinction.

The Chief of Police would not say the neck (area) hold was wrong, but that he kept him in that hold too long.

The so-called 9 minute hold happened why?  Because Chauvin would not relent?  Why were they all there during that period?  They were waiting for an ambulance.  The officers undoubtedly knew that; the crowd that formed likely did not.

If you're trying to kill someone with the intended result being death, do you call an ambulance?

If an ambulance is already called and you know that, and a crowd including video cameras is watching you, is this a good time to intentionally kill someone - in the course of your job?

After all the worldwide scrutiny, the officer is accused of failing to make a different judgment call and ease his holdat some point during the 9 minutes, let's day at 2 or 3 minutes in, and see if he resists again.  Had he done that, ease up after a couple of minutes, would George Floyd be dead?  Honestly, we don't know.

What we do know is that if the prosecutors had one word or shred of evidence that Floyd was treated more harshly because he is black, they would have used it and they haven't.

Therefore, all of this is about second guessing one person's judgment in the heat of the moment while doing his job.  Worst case this makes unintentional, negligent homicide - so far - and we haven't heard the defense yet.  What say others?

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #90 on: April 12, 2021, 09:52:53 AM »
I'm not seeing any reason whatsoever to keep the knee on once Floyd went out; even when the EMTs arrived.

Were I the officer what would occur to me at the very least would be to turn him on his back and elevate his legs or the cuffs behind made that difficult to put him on his side.

ccp

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Second degree - don't think this fits but others maybe
« Reply #91 on: April 12, 2021, 10:05:29 AM »
https://www.abc10.com/article/news/verify/verify-derek-chauvin-trial-george-floyd-death/507-afa13e1a-d761-4c1c-b426-25cad4a09039

that said
who knows what the jury will think

I personally cannot look at that video
and not feel grief

 at watching a man being snuffed out before my eyes
  way beyond what was necessary or reasonable
   

DougMacG

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #92 on: April 12, 2021, 10:29:49 AM »
I'm not seeing any reason whatsoever to keep the knee on once Floyd went out; even when the EMTs arrived.

Were I the officer what would occur to me at the very least would be to turn him on his back and elevate his legs or the cuffs behind made that difficult to put him on his side.

That makes sense to me. 

Had he done that, remove the knee once Floyd went out, would George Floyd be alive today?  [Probably not]  Would he face the same charges?  [Probably yes.]
« Last Edit: April 12, 2021, 12:51:23 PM by DougMacG »



ccp

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Harris- biden
« Reply #95 on: April 13, 2021, 04:57:10 AM »
https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2021/04/12/joe-biden-kamala-harris-tweet-support-for-duante-wright-family/

yesterday announced Crump representing Duante family

he seems to have a monopoly in this prized niche

again, no one on left mentions nearly everyone of these situations arise after resisting arrest for legitimate purposes

as far as gun rather then tazer going off
   of course a tragedy
   but why did the officer have to reach for either
in a man who knew he escaped police before ,  failed to show up to a court hearing,  would have known he had warrant for arrest .......

as Hannity pointed out :

where is the outrage when a police officer gets killed ?


DougMacG

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Re: Law Enforcement, Duante
« Reply #96 on: April 13, 2021, 08:42:27 AM »
A horrible mistake.  This fellow didn't deserve to die.  That said, he put himself in the situation where the horrible mistake could happen.

Separate from the mistake, was it the correct move for the officer to taze him?  I assume yes.  He was clearly fleeing arrest and police have the responsibility to take reasonable measures to stop that.


ccp:  "no one on left mentions nearly everyone of these situations arise after resisting arrest for legitimate purposes"

Also part of the talk Keith Ellison and others doesn't give when calming the crowds.
1. If you are law abiding citizen or made a small mistake or pulled over and did nothing wrong... answer just what you need to, make the incident as unmemorable for the officer as possible and say thank you when he hands you the ticket.  The rest, like fighting the charges or calling the officer out as a liar etc., gets handled through the prosecutor, courts, judge and due process.
2. If you are a real criminal, or accused of a real crime, or of a color and view that officers are out to get you, you should be even more polite and compliant, and address your complaints at the next steps in the justice system.

We are talking about this far and wide because of race: "Black man shot by police", not because someone was shot.  Just checking the news, there is this:
28 shot, 4 fatally, in Chicago over weekend
https://chicago.suntimes.com/crime/2021/4/10/22376959/chicago-weekend-shootings-april-10-12-crime-gun-violence-homicide
Isn't that worse?  They were perhaps all black.  Not a word from - choose your Left leader, Biden, Sharpton Ellison or our half black VP.

By the second day of this story we pretty much know it was not about race.  It was about fleeing, making a sudden move against people who are armed, forced someone with a loaded gun to make a sudden reaction, in this case the wrong one.  How can you say the officer made a mistake without also saying the deceased made a mistake, or series of mistakes?!

The officer [I heard this morning] is/was a 26 year veteran of that police force.

Brooklyn Center is an inner ring suburb of Minneapolis that has absorbed the spillover of problems from north Minneapolis, which has a spillover effect of people leaving places like Chicago and Detroit.  Some come to escape the crime; some come to commit the crimes.  By this measure, Brooklyn Center is more dangerous than 94% of US cities:
https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/mn/brooklyn-center/crime

I'm not sure what significance that context has here.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2021, 08:44:52 AM by DougMacG »

ccp

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Re: Law Enforcement
« Reply #97 on: April 13, 2021, 10:04:46 AM »
".By the second day of this story we pretty much know it was not about race.  It was about fleeing, making a sudden move against people who are armed, forced someone with a loaded gun to make a sudden reaction, in this case the wrong one.  How can you say the officer made a mistake without also saying the deceased made a mistake, or series of mistakes?!"

no it is long overdue to fight back against all the race hustling

NO NEED TO APOLOGIZE either anymore

STOP playing their game


G M

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DougMacG

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Re: Law Enforcement, Officer charged
« Reply #99 on: April 14, 2021, 11:02:35 AM »
Former Brooklyn Center police officer Kimberly Potter will be charged with second-degree manslaughter in the shooting death of Daunte Wright.  The charge carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.
https://news.yahoo.com/minnesota-police-officer-charged-in-connection-with-shooting-of-duante-wright-163108978.html
---------------------------

Daunte's alleged crimes (illegal firearm, aggravated robbery) include him using a gun perhaps similar to the one that ended his life? Wasn't Daunte risking accidental discharge also (and ending an innocent life) in the commission of the crime that led his warrant and this incident?

https://www.revolver.news/2021/04/minnesota-riots-daunte-wright-shooting-2021-american-clown-show/

"In 2019, Wright was arrested twice in one week, including for aggravated robbery, a felony. In summer 2020, a warrant went out for Wright after he violated the terms of his 2019 release. For good measure, Wright then allegedly committed another pair of offenses when he was found brandishing an illegal firearm and fled from police (who were able to recognize him based on past encounters)"

    - I looked up Daunte's criminal record and all I see for convictions are two petty misdemeanors.  At the link above they have court documents on those charges and court appearances, but how does this drag out two years without acquittal or conviction?  His 2019 arrest and release (and continuances, no doubt) fell into the Covid-based court shutdown of 2020?  In April of 2021, justice was still pending? 

If it was the Covid court closings of 2020 that kept his trial from happening, it's pretty bad that getting a fair trial for the accused and getting criminals convicted and off the street are considered non-essential activities.


« Last Edit: April 14, 2021, 11:31:34 AM by DougMacG »