Author Topic: Astronomy and Outer Space  (Read 91548 times)




Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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booster landing back on Earth - pinpoint precision!!!!!!
« Reply #104 on: May 31, 2020, 03:08:52 PM »
This is unbelievabe - something out of a 1930s Flash Gordon flick or 1950s science fiction movie!

Maybe need new thread. for this:  USA in Space !  :-D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dm__ZSLc6Is

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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James Webb Space Telescope
« Reply #109 on: October 01, 2021, 09:35:12 AM »



ccp

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Crafty_Dog

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Meteor Showers right now
« Reply #114 on: July 30, 2022, 06:09:37 AM »
2 Meteor Showers to Converge for a Late-Summer Light Show in the Night Sky—Here’s What You Need to Know
BY MICHAEL WING TIMEJULY 29, 2022 PRINT
What began as a hunk of frozen gas and space dust orbiting the sun 20,000 years ago will soon appear as a light show in the early morning sky.


Stargazers will be treated to two distinct meteor showers which converge in late summer and will soon make their yearly rendezvous again.

The famous Perseid meteor shower and the lesser-known Delta Aquariids will appear together at the same time—and may even cross paths—with the Delta Aquariids starting from mid-July and the Perseids joining them from August for the rest of the month.

The Delta Aquariids are already upon us and currently in full display. The shower’s nominal (predicted) peak, on July 29, coincides with the new moon, making for dark conditions and ideal meteor sighting. That’s soon—but it’s not too late to catch them, as the Delta Aquariids ramble on for weeks. One can expect to see as many as 20 Delta Aquariid meteors per hour under dark skies with no moonlight during peak period, according to EarthSky.

Epoch Times Photo
A meteor seen in the southern sky of New England, photographed in Sherborn, Massachusetts, early Nov. 18, 2001. (John Mottern/Getty Images)
The second shower, the Perseids, will join and intermingle with the Delta Aquariids come August. The Delta Aquariids tend to be fainter than the Perseids, but not this year; while the Perseids will peak on August 12–13, the waxing moon (becoming full August 12) will wash out some of their drama.


Thus, the early weeks of August present ample opportunity for meteor spotting in the northern hemisphere.

Particularly notable to watch for are the glowing ionized trails of gas that meteors sometimes leave behind, called persistent trains, which can last for one or two seconds after the meteor passes. About 5 to 10 percent of the Delta Aquariid meteors have these spectacular streaks.

Both light shows will trail off and end on August 21, saying sayonara until next year.

How to Catch the Delta Aquariids and the Perseids
The Delta Aquariids shoot from the direction of constellation Aquarius. The shower’s “radiant,” the single point from which meteors emanate, is located near Aquarius’ third brightest star, the constellation’s “delta,” hence the name “Delta Aquariids.”

The Delta Aquariids, like the Eta Aquariids, favor viewership in the southern hemisphere, but they can readily be seen from latitudes across the southern U.S. Looking southward from the northern hemisphere, sky watchers will see the constellation arc across the southern sky. Stargazers further north than this tend to discount the Delta Aquariids. From mid-July until the end of August, the shower’s radiant will rise in mid-evening, reach its highest around 2 a.m., then set low in the sky by dawn.

The Perseids’ radiant hits the constellation Perseus, which stretches from the low northeast to high north when viewed from the northern hemisphere.

To best glimpse both meteor showers, find a position away from artificial light on a moonless night with a field of view that captures as much sky as possible. One need not look to the radiant for meteors, as they shoot outward from there and may appear anywhere across the heavens.

Image of comet and Venus close to the Sun.
Comet 96P Machholz orbits the sun about every 5.3 years. (NASA/ESA/SOHO)
File:96P 20070403 000500 HI1A.png
Comet 96P Machholz, the parent of the Delta Aquariid meteor shower, on May 12, 1986. (PD-US)
Where Do the Delta Aquariids Originate From?
Meteors are the dispersed remnants of comets—amorphous chucks of frozen gas and space dust that constantly shed their material as they travel throughout outer space.

Our solar system has many comets orbiting the sun, one of which being 96P Machholz, discovered by Don Machholz in 1986, which has been shedding its matter for millennia up until today. Material leaving the comet’s nucleus about 20,000 years ago caused the Delta Aquariid, a recent study suggests. The parent comet is also part of a the 96P Machholz Complex, comprising eight different meteor showers, the Marsden and Kracht comet groups, and at least one asteroid, called 2003 EH1. Over eons, their orbits around the sun gradually diverged.

Over millennia, 96P Machholz’s orbit has shifted in shape and tilt. It circles the sun every 5.3 Earth years, and brushes as close as 0.12 astronomical units (or AU, the distance between Earth and the sun) from the sun, well inside Mercury’s orbit. Comet 96P Machholz has quite literally scattered its detritus throughout the inner solar system. That matter, when it encounters Earth, falls and burns up in the atmosphere, causing meteor showers.

Peak meteor viewing is already in full swing. But the opening of August will definitely host a symphony of lights in the early morning sky as two meteor showers team up until month’s end. Enjoy the show!

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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from outer space :lonsdaleite
« Reply #116 on: September 16, 2022, 07:33:14 AM »
really cool  8-):

https://www.cnn.com/2022/09/16/world/space-diamond-lonsdaleite-scn/index.html

it may get even more expensive to get a wedding ring  :-D


Crafty_Dog

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Hot Tuna with Paul Kantner
« Reply #118 on: November 07, 2022, 11:52:58 AM »

Crafty_Dog

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Leonid Meteor Shower on Nov. 17
« Reply #119 on: November 13, 2022, 07:38:32 AM »
Leonid Meteor Shower Expected to Rain Down on Earth on Night of Nov. 17—Here’s What You Need to Know
BY MICHAEL WING TIMENOVEMBER 10, 2022 PRINT

Every mid-November, Earth passes through a region of outer space littered with bits of cosmic debris that habitually light up like matches in the night sky. The leftover remnants of a comet, called 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, manifest as a stream of space dust, rock, and frozen gas trailing throughout the solar system. Their striking the Earth’s atmosphere results in a pyrotechnic spectacle called a meteor shower, which sometimes turns into a prolific, even sublime, meteor storm.


This particular November meteor shower is called the Leonids, so named because it seems to radiate from a point located in the constellation Leo the lion. If you want to catch this celestial light show, you still have a few days before they peak.

How to Spot the Leonids

The Leonids have already gotten underway—they last from Nov. 3 through Dec. 2—but are expected to peak on the evening of Nov. 17 through the morning of Nov. 18. So, there’s lots of time for meteor sighting.


One can expect to see as many as 15 meteors per hour under ideal conditions. Nov. 17 will mark the fat waning crescent moon, so there should be ample darkness to provide the necessary contrast to see them. Try to find an unobstructed viewpoint where there are no city lights.


Wherever you may reside, the best time to catch the Leonids is between late evening and moonrise. The meteor shower’s “radiant”—the point from which shooting stars appear to emanate—is located smack dab in the middle of Leo the lion’s mane; more precisely, it is just above the star Algieba. The radiant will rise around midnight and appear highest in the sky at dawn.


One needn’t look precisely at the radiant to find meteors—to the contrary. You won’t see many appearing there, because they radiate outward from that point. They can be spotted anywhere across the night sky and are most visible when seen about 30 degrees from their point of origin. But why do they all seem to emanate from a single point? Why do they have a radiant?

Where Meteors Come From

The Leonids, just like other meteor showers which occur annually at various times throughout the year, are associated with their particular parent comet, which is constantly shedding streams of debris along its elliptical orbit around the sun (becoming more prolific during its closest approach to the sun).

That debris travels in nearly the exact same direction as their corresponding comet; that’s why whenever Earth passes through one of these debris streams, the subsequent shooting stars seem to all radiate from the same point. A trick of perspective makes it seem like they converge: just like a pair of train tracks running parallel appear to converge on the horizon, meteors traveling in parallel appear to emanate from the radiant.

Speaking of comets, the Leonids’ parent comet, 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, was so named because it was discovered independently by two different astronomers around the same time. On the evening of Dec. 19, 1865, William Tempel of Marseilles Observatory in France first sighted it in the northern sky, under the north star. Then, 17 days later, on the evening of January 5, 1866, it was spotted again by Horace Tuttle of Harvard College Observatory. Because the second discovery was independent, Tuttle’s name was added.

Based on calculations taken from the comet back then, astronomers estimated it would return in 33.17 years, after completing its laborious orbit around the sun. With 55P/Tempel-Tuttle’s discovery, astronomers also concluded that the meteor showers and storms occurring annually this time of year were products of the comet.

In 1833, stargazers witnessed one of the most famous meteor storms in modern memory, during which over 100,000 Leonids per hour rained down upon the Earth, giving some observers a strong sense of the Earth traveling through space, fording a stream of cosmic detritus. Since then, meteor enthusiasts have gazed up every 33 years scouting out Leonid storms. In the years 1866 and 1867, the Leonids delivered more spectacular storms.


After the comet’s discovery, astronomers and stargazers expected November 1899 to present a big show—the comet’s return took a backseat to the prospect of a Leonid storm, which was highly anticipated. It was considered a great public disappointment in astronomy, however, when it did not materialize.

There were no great Leonid storms again until Nov. 17, 1966, when observers in the southwestern United States reported spotting as many as 40 to 50 meteors per second within a span of 15 minutes. The comet’s return in 1998 (when it became visible with binoculars) was followed by a dazzling meteor storm display from 1999 through 2001. The comet is expected to return in early 2031, possibly with a Leonid storm encore.

This year’s Leonids are anticipated is be less of a lion and more of a lamb. Nevertheless, if you gaze up on the evening of Nov. 17, the starry expanse surrounding the constellation Leo could yield a few noteworthy shooting stars.

Share your stories with us at emg.inspired@epochtimes.com, and continue to get your daily dose of inspiration by signing up for the Inspired newsletter at TheEpochTimes.com/newsletter

ccp

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ccp

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the rings of Neptune
« Reply #122 on: April 17, 2023, 11:11:56 AM »

ccp

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Universe maybe not expanding
« Reply #123 on: June 21, 2023, 09:02:33 AM »
and apparently this theory solves some problems giving it merit

if this turns out to be correct I see a Nobel in the cards:

https://www.livescience.com/physics-mathematics/dark-energy/the-expansion-of-the-universe-could-be-a-mirage-new-theoretical-study-suggests

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Astronomy
« Reply #124 on: June 21, 2023, 02:41:48 PM »
Intriguing!

ccp

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Euclid will join James Webb Space Telescope
« Reply #125 on: July 02, 2023, 09:37:34 AM »
using Elon rocker vs Russian rocket to get to 4 x the distance away from Earth the the moon:

https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2023/07/02/europes-space-telescope-launches-to-study-dark-mysteries-of-the-universe/

Euclid:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclid_(spacecraft)

I guess it is coincidence Euclid includes first same two letters as Europe.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euclid

"The new mission concept was called Euclid, honouring the Greek mathematician Euclid of Alexandria (~300 BC), who is considered the father of geometry. In October 2011, Euclid was selected by ESA's Science Programme Committee for implementation, and on 25 June 2012 it was formally adopted.[1]"



ccp

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Body-by-Guinness

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Patching Voyager Spacecraft Software at the Edge of the Solar System
« Reply #130 on: October 24, 2023, 10:35:32 PM »
Perhaps misfiled, but I didn’t want to risk the wrath of our esteemed moderator by starting a “space exploration” thread.

The Voyager spacecraft that have been traveling toward the outer reaches of the solar system are receiving a software patch essentially updating their 50 year old OS. Pretty wicked cool….

I wonder what the Earth to Pluto baud rate is…/

https://science.slashdot.org/story/23/10/23/004220/nasa-transmits-patches-to-the-two-voyager-probes-launched-in-1977?utm_source=rss1.0mainlinkanon&utm_medium=feed

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Astronomy
« Reply #131 on: October 26, 2023, 01:26:43 PM »
Good call  :-D

To clarify matters I have added Outer Space to the name of this thread.

Yes, there is also another Space thread and yes this can be confusing and it is not the only example.  in the coming days i will be looking to combine such threads and/or block duplicative ones.

Also, key point here-- many posts can fit well in more than one thread-- feel free to post worthy posts in more than one thread-- this will help the findability of such posts down the road.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2023, 01:31:30 PM by Crafty_Dog »


Body-by-Guinness

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Alien Life on an Exoplanet Found?
« Reply #133 on: January 12, 2024, 02:54:15 PM »
Hmm, might this be the year we learn there is life well beyond earth and our solar system?

https://www.spectator.co.uk/article/have-we-just-discovered-aliens/?

Body-by-Guinness

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Sh!t Oh Dear, Mining the Moon Might Despoil an Airless Rock
« Reply #134 on: January 25, 2024, 09:37:01 AM »
Tempted to file this in Pathological Science given that this author is wringing hands over making a mining mess on an uninhabited, airless moon, that has little in the way of weather, running bodies of water, etc. to worry about polluting and hence poisoning people downstream or whatever. Seems like a preemptive attempt to impose biota-rich planetary standards on a place that is anything but, to the detriment of humankind, particularly those in resource-poor countries in desperate need of inexpensive raw materials. Another "Progressive" day at the office, in short:

https://hackaday.com/2024/01/25/could-moon-mining-spoil-its-untouched-grandeur-and-science-value/

ccp

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Has life been discovered in another world ?
« Reply #135 on: January 25, 2024, 12:45:21 PM »
Maybe:  indications it has an ocean, an atmosphere, is a planet 2.6 diameters of the Earth and goldi-locks distance from a red dwarf star:

https://www.livescience.com/space/exoplanets/james-webb-telescope-sees-potential-signs-of-alien-life-in-the-atmosphere-of-a-distant-goldilocks-water-world

but 50 light years away.....


Body-by-Guinness

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You Say Zoozve, While I Say 2002-VE
« Reply #136 on: January 28, 2024, 01:14:48 PM »
Fascinating bit of Venusian detective work:

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1750952860131729544.html

Body-by-Guinness

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Body-by-Guinness

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Unobtainium: Asteroid Contains New, Super-Dense Element?
« Reply #138 on: March 07, 2024, 10:16:59 AM »

Body-by-Guinness

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2.4 Million Earth/Mars Gravitational Dance …
« Reply #139 on: March 25, 2024, 05:35:18 PM »
… impacts Earth’s orbit, driving it closer to the sun while stirring up deep ocean currents. Posted as this is yet another potential confounding variable where “climate change” is concerned:

https://www.livescience.com/planet-earth/rivers-oceans/every-24-million-years-mars-tugs-on-earth-so-hard-it-changes-the-ocean-floor

Body-by-Guinness

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Black Holes Shown to have Magnetic Fields
« Reply #140 on: March 28, 2024, 07:37:35 PM »
Cool stuff:

Now We Can See the Magnetic Maelstrom Around Our Galaxy’s Supermassive Black Hole

Astronomers unveil magnetic fields around black

•Singularity Hub / by Jason Dorrier / Mar 27, 2024 at 6:17 PM

Black holes are known for ferocious gravitational fields. Anything wandering too close, even light, will be swallowed up. But other forces may be at play too.

In 2021, astronomers used the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) to make a polarized image of the enormous black hole at the center of the galaxy M87. The image showed an organized swirl of magnetic fields threading the matter orbiting the object. M87*, as the black hole is known, is nearly 1,000 times bigger than our own galaxy’s central black hole, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) and is dining on the equivalent of a few suns per year. With its comparatively modest size and appetite—Sgr A* is basically fasting at the moment—scientists wondered if our galaxy’s black hole would have strong magnetic fields too.

Now, we know.

In the first polarized image of Sgr A*, released alongside two papers published today (here and here), EHT scientists say the black hole has strong magnetic fields akin to those seen in M87*. The image depicts a fiery whirlpool (the disc of material falling into Sgr A*) circling the drain (the black hole’s shadow) with magnetic field lines woven throughout.

In contrast to unpolarized light, polarized light is oriented in only one direction. Like a pair of quality sunglasses, magnetized regions in space polarize light too. These polarized images of the two black holes therefore map out their magnetic fields.

And surprisingly, they’re similar.


Side-by-side polarized images of supermassive black holes M87* and Sagittarius A*. Image Credit: EHT Collaboration
“With a sample of two black holes—with very different masses and very different host galaxies—it’s important to determine what they agree and disagree on,” Mariafelicia De Laurentis, EHT deputy project scientist and professor at the University of Naples Federico II, said in a press release. “Since both are pointing us toward strong magnetic fields, it suggests that this may be a universal and perhaps fundamental feature of these kinds of systems.”

Making the image was no simple task. Compared to M87*, whose disc is larger and moves relatively slowly, imaging Sgr A* is like trying to photograph a cosmic toddler—its material is always in motion, reaching nearly the speed of light. The scientists had to use new tools in addition to those that yielded the polarized image of M87* and weren’t even sure the image would be possible.

Such technical feats take enormous teams of scientists organized across the globe. The first three pages of each new paper are dedicated to authors and affiliations. In addition, the EHT itself spans the world. Astronomers stitch observations made by eight telescopes into a virtual Earth-sized telescope capable of resolving objects the apparent size of a donut on the moon as viewed from the surface of our planet.

The EHT team plans to make more observations—the next round for Sgr A* begins next month—and add telescopes on Earth and space to increase the quality and breadth of the images. One outstanding question is whether Sgr A* has a jet of material shooting out from its poles like M87* does. The ability to make movies of the black hole later this decade—which should be spectacular—could resolve the mystery.

“We expect strong and ordered magnetic fields to be directly linked to the launching of jets as we observed for M87*,” Sara Issaoun, research co-leader and a fellow at Harvard & Smithsonian’s Center for Astrophysics, told Space.com. “Since Sgr A*, with no observed jet, seems to have a very similar geometry, perhaps there is also a jet lurking in Sgr A* waiting to be observed, which would be super exciting!”

The discovery of a jet, added to strong magnetic fields, would mean these features may be common to supermassive black holes across the spectrum. Learning more about their features and behavior can help scientists piece together a better picture of how galaxies, including the Milky Way, evolve over eons in tandem with the black holes at their hearts.

Image Credit: EHT Collaboration

https://singularityhub.com/2024/03/27/now-we-can-see-the-magnetic-maelstrom-around-our-galaxys-supermassive-black-hole/

Crafty_Dog

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FO: Space Storm Alert
« Reply #141 on: May 10, 2024, 07:39:45 AM »


(2) NOAA ISSUES FIRST SEVERE SPACE STORM WATCH IN TWO DECADES: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center issued a Severe (G4) Geomagnetic Storm Watch yesterday, the first since 2005.

According to NOAA, at least five Earth-directed coronal mass ejections are expected to arrive as early as midday today, and persist through Sunday, 12 May.

Why It Matters: Geomagnetic storms could impact Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation, long-range radio communications, and critical infrastructure, including the electric grid. – R.C.

Here’s a great video explaining CME versus electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from Arthur Bradley: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQwv02RP8F4

Body-by-Guinness

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Dyson Spheres Found?
« Reply #142 on: May 14, 2024, 05:59:20 PM »
Dyson spheres—theoretic structures built around stars by an advanced civilization—may have been located:

https://www.popularmechanics.com/space/deep-space/a60780331/dyson-sphere-evidence-alien-civilizations/