Author Topic: North Carolina  (Read 28707 times)


Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Hickory = Mayberry
« Reply #152 on: December 21, 2023, 06:32:51 AM »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #153 on: December 26, 2023, 09:50:26 AM »
On November 29 of this year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did something that’s quite unusual for a large department of the federal government: it undertook a swift about-face on a matter of great importance to the public health of Americans in response to the reporting of a journalist working in a small, nonprofit newsroom.

The action EPA took was to withdraw the approval it had previously granted to the multinational chemical manufacturer, Chemours, to export wastewater shipments containing millions of pounds of the toxic substance known as GenX from its Dordrecht Works facility in the Netherlands to its facility in Fayetteville.

And the reporter who broke the story of the planned chemical waste shipment for U.S. readers just over a month earlier – a report that spurred citizens and elected leaders to demand a second look at the plan by EPA – was NC Newsline Environmental Investigative reporter Lisa Sorg.

====================================

https://ncnewsline.com/2023/11/29/epa-withdraws-consent-for-chemours-to-export-genx-from-netherlands-to-fayetteville/?emci=97b26963-8a9e-ee11-bea1-002248223f36&emdi=0e0a0834-10a4-ee11-bea1-002248223f36&ceid=244814 
« Last Edit: December 26, 2023, 09:57:09 AM by Crafty_Dog »

Crafty_Dog

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WT: North Carolina fire culture for pine trees
« Reply #154 on: December 27, 2023, 03:35:29 AM »
NORTH CAROLINA

Forest residents rekindle ‘fire culture’ to restore longleaf pine tree

BY JAMES POLLARD ASSOCIATED PRESS WEST END, N.C. | Jesse Wimberley burns the woods with his neighbors.

Using new tools to revive a communal tradition, they set fire to wiregrasses and forest debris with a drip torch, corralling embers with leaf blowers.

Mr. Wimberley, 65, gathers groups across eight North Carolina counties to starve future wildfires by lighting leaf litter ablaze. The burns clear space for longleaf pine, a tree species whose seeds won’t sprout on undergrowth blocking bare soil.

Since 2016, the fourth-generation burner has fueled a burgeoning movement to formalize these volunteer ranks.

Prescribed burn associations are proving key to conservationists’ efforts to restore a longleaf pine range forming the backbone of forest ecology in the American Southeast. Volunteer teams, many working private land where participants live or make a living, are filling service and knowledge gaps one blaze at a time.

Prescribed fires, the intentional burning replicating natural fires crucial for forest health, require more hands than experts can supply. In North Carolina, the practice sometimes ends with a barbecue.

“Southerners like coming together and doing things and helping each other and having some food,” Mr. Wimberley said. “Fire is not something you do by yourself.”

More than 100 associations exist throughout 18 states, according to North Carolina State University researchers, and the Southeast is a hot spot for new ones.

Mr. Wimberley’s Sandhills Prescribed Burn Association is considered the region’s first, and the group reports having helped up to 500 people clear land or learn to do it themselves.

The proliferation follows federal officials’ push in the past century to suppress forest fires.

The policy sought to protect the expanding footprint of private homes and interrupted fire cycles that accompanied longleaf evolution, which Indigenous people and early settlers simulated through targeted burns.

“Fire is medicine and it heals the land. It’s also medicine for our people,” said Courtney Steed, outreach coordinator for the Sandhills Prescribed Burn Association and a Lumbee Tribe member. “It’s putting us back in touch with our traditions.”

The longleaf pine ecosystem spans just 3% of the 140,000 square miles it encompassed before industrialization and urbanization.

But some pockets remain, from Virginia to Texas to Florida. The system’s greenery still harbors the bobwhite quail and other declining species. The conifers are especially resistant to drought, a hazard growing more common and more severe due to climate change

Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Redistricting in North Carolina
« Reply #156 on: January 02, 2024, 02:24:06 PM »


Crafty_Dog

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One of My Senators
« Reply #158 on: January 19, 2024, 04:17:17 PM »


Crafty_Dog

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WT: Judge blocks tighter rule on same day registrations
« Reply #160 on: January 24, 2024, 06:15:29 AM »
Judge blocks tighter rule on same-day voter registration

Says one-mailer system lacks due process protections

BY GARY D. ROBERTSON ASSOCIATED PRESS RALEIGH, N.C. | A federal judge has blocked, for now, a law recently approved by North Carolina lawmakers that tightens a rule on when a ballot cast by someone who is simultaneously registering to vote is removed from election counts.

The preliminary injunction from U.S. District Judge Thomas Schroeder tells elections workers they can’t nullify ballots by screening citizens who register and immediately vote over a 17day period before a primary or general election through an altered method unless applicant protections are created.

More than 100,000 new registrants have sought “same-day registration” in North Carolina in each of the last two presidential general elections, so slight adjustments in the closely divided state could make a difference in November’s elections for president, as well as governor and other statewide positions.

Early in-person voting — and thus same-day registration — for the March 5 primaries begins Feb. 15.

The new law is contained within broader voting administration legislation enacted by the Republican-controlled General Assembly in the fall over Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper’s veto. It would remove a registrant’s ballot from the count after one mailed notice to the person’s address by election officials is returned as undeliverable, instead of two under the previous law.

The new provision has been challenged in at least three lawsuits. Judge Schroeder’s 94-page ruling Sunday involved two of the lawsuits filed in October, one by the state and national Democratic parties and the other by national and local voter advocacy groups and a voter.

Judge Schroeder, who was nominated to the bench by President George W. Bush, wrote that the one-mailer procedure doesn’t provide due process protections for voters to learn that their registrations were rejected and to appeal the decision to officials so the ballots could still count.

The plaintiffs said the new procedure would increase the risk that Postal Service mishaps and paperwork errors would lead to more registration denials. Judge Schroeder’s order cited evidence from a plaintiff called Voto Latino about election worker errors leading to verification cards being returned as undeliverable in 2022.

Giving people only one chance to verify by mail would be a “substantial burden on same-day registrants who cast a ballot,” Judge Schroeder said. They “will face a non-trivial risk of being erroneously disenfranchised by failing address verification due to governmental error, rather than factors related to their eligibility to vote, without any notice and opportunity to be heard,” the judge’s ruling said.

Judge Schroeder, whose ruling can be appealed, said his injunction would remain in force until due process concerns are addressed.

Two GOP state House leaders, Speaker Tim Moore and elections committee chair Rep. Grey Mills, said Monday in a news release that Judge Schroeder’s order “requires relatively minor changes” and that they were working with the State Board of Elections “to ensure that the entire bill is in effect before the primary and general elections this year.”

Representatives of some of the plaintiffs praised the ruling as a “major victory” and will “continue working to ensure that the (mail provision) does not wrongfully disenfranchise eligible North Carolinians in 2024,” attorney Aria Branch said in a news release.

Lawyers for the state board and GOP legislative leaders defending the new verification rule in court have said reducing the number of mailers to confirm the applicant’s mailing address attempts to address a problem with same-day registration.

The previous law could lead to situations where the second verification mailer is returned as undeliverable after vote totals are confirmed, meaning the ineligible registrant’s ballot is still counted. State lawyers also said a ruling in a previous lawsuit discourages efforts by local election boards to challenge such votes before the final count.

Judge Schroeder acknowledged there are legitimate interests in using address verification to promote preserving the integrity of the election process and instilling voter confidence.

But he wrote the plaintiffs have shown the “precise interests asserted in this case likely do not outweigh the substantial burden on the rights of same-day registrants who cast a ballot.”



ccp

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Pinehurst :)
« Reply #163 on: February 01, 2024, 07:15:42 AM »
Pinehurst - wow

that is where my nephew and niece lived . both Army majors
lived near golf course

I will have to send this to them

They have moved since and soon going to Virginia as she will work with Kamala (did I spell this right?)
« Last Edit: February 01, 2024, 07:19:28 AM by ccp »


Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Mark Robinson Rep. governor candidate
« Reply #169 on: March 07, 2024, 05:19:40 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Robinson_(American_politician)

The MSM is all over hitting him with "controversial" remarks he has made.

CD , do you have any thoughts about him or the NC race?

Crafty_Dog

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #170 on: March 07, 2024, 07:26:42 AM »
I briefly tried tracking down the purported remark, but somehow it seems to be hard to find.  Imagine that.

Spectrum TV (roughly a Dem leaning PBS for NC) had a really nice extended segment on him a few months ago.  I liked the man that I saw in that piece.

He is awesome on Second Amendment and other things and had my vote on Tuesday.  Glad to see he won quite decisively.





Crafty_Dog

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North Carolina CCW Law
« Reply #173 on: March 20, 2024, 10:52:26 AM »
second

Because of your kind donation to the North Carolina Sheriffs' Association (NCSA) through your county firearm permit application, NCSA provides you with up-to-date information on gun laws and firearms purchasing laws that affect you as a North Carolina citizen.

It is always a good idea to refresh your memory on the basics of the law related to concealed handgun permits. The North Carolina Sheriffs' Association wants to help.

 

Remember that a handgun is the only weapon that the concealed handgun permit authorizes you to carry. A handgun is defined by law as “a firearm that has a short stock and is designed to be held and fired by the use of a single hand.” For example, a handgun would include a revolver or semi-automatic pistol.



A concealed handgun permit does not authorize you to carry a concealed rifle, shotgun, fully automatic weapon, or other deadly weapons such as a knife, blackjack, razor, metallic knuckles, bowie knife, loaded cane, stun gun, etc.



To be considered “concealed,” a handgun must be “about the person” which generally refers to being concealed from view on your person or within arm’s reach or readily accessible by you.



The concealed handgun permit issued by your sheriff must be in your possession at all times a concealed handgun is carried by the permit holder. Valid identification is also required such as a driver’s license or state identification card. Carrying a concealed handgun off your premises without both a (1) validly issued concealed handgun permit and (2) a valid form of identification is unlawful.



It is vitally important to remember that if approached by a law enforcement officer while you are carrying a concealed handgun on or “about” your person, you are required to disclose that information to the officer. This is always true when you are carrying a concealed handgun, even if you are in your own vehicle during a traffic stop. 



All persons with a concealed weapon should make the disclosure as soon as you are approached by a law enforcement officer. Tell the officer you are carrying a concealed handgun with your hands visible, such as both hands on the steering wheel, to the officer and do not attempt to reach for the concealed handgun or your concealed handgun permit, until instructed by the law enforcement officer.



Knowing and following the law related to concealed handgun permits is important to keep you, the public, and law enforcement safe.




ccp

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Re: North Carolina
« Reply #177 on: April 26, 2024, 04:16:57 PM »
Another Jewish crat

what the hell is wrong with them

in NC?

ccp

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medical marijuana not legal in NC
« Reply #178 on: May 01, 2024, 08:16:41 AM »
except on Cherokee Indian reservation kind of

one could get doctor attestation that person has a medical condition go to the reservation dispensary and get cannibis but must use on Indian land .

The two senators are requesting clarification from DEA and other Fed agencies on this.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/news/historic-medical-marijuana-dispensary-opens-in-cherokee-nc-1st-in-the-state/ar-AA1nmAwA

Crafty_Dog

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Dan Bishop for AG of NC
« Reply #179 on: May 09, 2024, 08:42:16 AM »
https://secure.winred.com/bishop-for-nc/75bbe367-3f94-466e-91f6-54d87b1ef842?recurring=true&amount=25&utm_term=9702866

Bishop has been our Congressman.   Outstanding in every regard!  He now runs for AG of NC.







Crafty_Dog

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WT: North Carolina forever chemicals bill
« Reply #186 on: June 13, 2024, 07:45:32 AM »


NORTH CAROLINA

Bill advances to force ‘forever chemicals’ makers to pay for water systems fixes

BY GARY D. ROBERTSON ASSOCIATED PRESS RALEIGH, N.C. | North Carolina’s top environmental regulator could order manufacturers of “forever chemicals” to help pay for water system cleanup upgrades whenever they are found responsible for discharges that contaminate drinking water beyond acceptable levels, under legislation advanced by a state House committee.

The measure was sought by Republican lawmakers from the Wilmington area, where upstream discharges into the Cape Fear River of a kind of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances — also called PFAS — have contributed to public utilities serving hundreds of thousands of people to spend large amounts to filter them out. Accumulating scientific evidence suggests such chemicals, which resist breaking down, can cause harm to humans.

One bill sponsor said it’s appropriate for companies that produced such chemicals and released them into the environment to cover the costs for cleaning up the water.

“It is not fair for the ratepayers to have to pay this bill while the people who are actually responsible for making this stuff from scratch that got into those utilities aren’t having to foot the bill,” state Rep. Ted Davis of New Hanover County told the House Environment Committee. The panel approved the measure with bipartisan support.

The bill, if ultimately enacted, certainly would threaten more costs for The Chemours Co., which a state investigation found had discharged for decades a type of PFAS from its Fayetteville Works plant in Bladen County, reaching the air, the river and groundwater. The discharges weren’t made widely public until 2017.

The bill would authorize the state Department of Environmental Quality secretary to order a “responsible party” for PFAS contamination that exceed set maximum levels in drinking water to pay public water systems the “actual and necessary costs” they incurred to remove or correct the contamination. Only a PFAS manufacturer can be a “responsible party.”

The legislation also would make clear that a public water system that receives reimbursements must lower customer water rates if they were raised to pay for abatement efforts.

PFAS chemicals have been produced for a number of purposes — they helped eggs slide across nonstick frying pans, ensured that firefighting foam suffocates flames and helped clothes withstand the rain and keep people dry. GenX — produced at the Bladen plant — is associated with nonstick coatings.

Mr. Davis pushed unsuccessfully in 2022 for a similar bill, which at the time also ordered state regulators to set maximum acceptable levels of “forever chemicals.” The latest measure leaves that out, and sets the standards for action based on new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency “maximum contaminant levels” for six PFAS types in drinking water, including GenX.

A Chemours lobbyist told the committee that the company was being targeted by the bill, even as the company has taken actions to address the PFAS release.

Chemours has invested at the plant to keep the chemical from entering the groundwater through an underwater wall and the air through a thermal oxidizer, lobbyist Jeff Fritz said, and it’s worked closely with state environmental regulators to address past contamination.

“Given those actions, we respectfully ask that this bill not proceed,” Mr. Fritz said. The company has been required to provide water filtration systems for homes with contaminated wells, for example.

The North Carolina Manufacturers Alliance opposes the bill, while the American Chemistry Council expressed concerns about details, their representatives said. They pointed to how the measure would apply retroactively to expenses incurred since early 2017, based on contamination standards that were just established in April.