Author Topic: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces  (Read 728424 times)

G M

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Re: Strassel: Trump Erases His Legacy
« Reply #1950 on: January 09, 2021, 06:22:14 PM »
Trump's true legacy is showing how utterly corrupt our institutions have become.


Trump Erases His Legacy
He also destroyed any chance of a political future, all on a single Wednesday afternoon.
By Kimberley A. Strassel
Jan. 7, 2021 6:22 pm ET


WSJ Opinion: Trump Erases His Legacy

Potomac Watch: A politician has to work hard to destroy a legacy and a future in a single day. President Donald J. Trump managed it. Image: John Minchillo/Associated Press




A politician has to work hard to destroy a legacy and a future in a single day. President Donald J. Trump managed it.


By this Wednesday afternoon, media outlets had called both Georgia Senate runoffs for the Democratic candidates, handing Sen. Chuck Schumer the keys to that chamber. We now have a Democrat-controlled Washington. The Georgia news came as a mob of Trump supporters—egged on by the president himself—occupied the U.S. Capitol building. Now four people are dead, while aides and officials run for the exits.



It didn’t have to be this way. The president had every right—even an obligation, given the ad hoc changes to voting rules—to challenge state election results in court. But when those challenges failed (which every one did, completely), he had the opportunity to embrace his legacy, cement his accomplishments, and continue to play a powerful role in GOP politics.


Mr. Trump could have reveled in the mantle of the one-term disrupter—the man the electorate sent to Washington to deliver the message that it was tired of business as usual. He could have pointed out just how successful he was in that mission by stacking his cabinet with reformers, busting convention, and overseeing policy changes that astounded (and delighted) even many warrior conservatives.



The withdrawal from the Paris climate accord and the Iranian deal. The greatest tax simplification and reduction since Reagan. The largest deregulatory effort since—well, ever. Three Supreme Court justices and 54 appellate court judges. Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Reserve. The Jerusalem embassy. Criminal-justice reform. Opportunity zones. He could have noted that the greatest proof of just how much Democrats and the establishment feared his mission were the five years of investigations, hysterical allegations and “deep state” sabotage—which he survived.

Mostly, he could have explained that all this was at considerably heightened risk if Democrats win the Senate—and invested himself fully in Georgia. Every day needed to be about fundraising, rallying the troops, making clear to his supporters that the only way to preserve this legacy was to keep the Senate in GOP hands.


That isn’t what happened. Obviously. Following court losses, Mr. Trump, in his own words, devoted “125% of my energy” to his own grievances. He declared the Georgia Senate races “illegal and invalid,” discouraging voting. He actively undercut Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler with late-game demands for $2,000 stimulus checks and with his veto of a defense authorization bill that provided pay raises and support for Georgia’s military bases. His denial of the presidential results energized Democrats and depressed Republicans. Turnout in Trump counties lagged, while turnout in some Democratic areas nearly reached that of the November election.


Mr. Trump is leaving, and thanks to his final denial of reality, Mr. Schumer will now methodically erase his policy history. Democrats need only 51 votes to eliminate the Trump tax reform, 51 to use the Congressional Review Act to undo his final deregulations; 51 to wave through liberal judges to counter Mr. Trump’s picks. And this is before Mr. Biden gets busy reversing Trump policy by executive fiat, and assuming Democrats forbear from abolishing the legislative filibuster.



So that’s his legacy, largely gone. As for his future, Mr. Trump’s role in inflaming the Capitol mob has likely put paid to that, as well. Dedicated members of his administration are resigning. Longtime supporters in Congress are turning. Millions of Americans who for years were willing to tolerate, often even celebrate, Mr. Trump’s brash behavior in the pursuit of reform or good policy, are less amused by the wreckage he has visited on party and policy. And they’ll be unwilling to go there again in 2024.


Trump loyalists may well condemn anyone who speaks honestly of all this as RINOs or spineless Beltwayers who care nothing of “election fraud.” But to quote the incoming president, “C’mon, man.” It’s one thing to scorn a Mitt Romney. But many of the senators throwing up their hands are the ones who fearlessly rooted out the false Russia collusion accusations, who defended Mr. Trump through baseless impeachment proceedings, and who understand the need for voting reform. Many of the officials resigning are bold conservatives, attracted to an administration they knew would let them break china. They too are stunned, and demoralized, by the president’s decision to tank their work.


“We signed up for making America great again. We signed up for lower taxes and less regulation. The president has a long list of successes that we can be proud of. But all of that went away yesterday.” That was Mick Mulvaney talking to CNBC Thursday. Mr. Mulvaney, the tea-party supporter, founding member of the House Freedom caucus, and the onetime Trump chief of staff. Hardly an establishment weenie.


The pity is that Mr. Trump’s conflagration will mostly burn the Americans he went to Washington to help. They will bear the higher taxes, the higher costs of regulation, the higher unemployment, the loss of freedoms. America became less great this week. And that’s fully on the guy at the top.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces
« Reply #1951 on: January 09, 2021, 06:43:36 PM »
True that, and true that he would seem to have thrown away a goodly percentage of all the deep good he did.

G M

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Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces
« Reply #1952 on: January 09, 2021, 07:10:21 PM »
True that, and true that he would seem to have thrown away a goodly percentage of all the deep good he did.

Why? Because the the people who hate him and us, still hate him and us?


ccp

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If would pray we get someone else , not Trump 2024
« Reply #1953 on: January 09, 2021, 09:29:28 PM »
".Longtime supporters in Congress are turning. Millions of Americans who for years were willing to tolerate, often even celebrate, Mr. Trump’s brash behavior in the pursuit of reform or good policy, are less amused by the wreckage he has visited on party and policy. And they’ll be unwilling to go there again in 2024."

Quite frankly I am one who is not amused by losing the Senate possibly to miscalculations in the last 2 months by Trump .  He singlehandedly divided his own party with calling out Republicans in Georgia ,  slapping his most ardent supporter in the face (VP Pence ) at the end in desperation

he has burned endless bridges - who would want to work with him in '24?

and turning off many independents and out of no where calling for the $600 payday be raised to 2,000 dollars without thinking it through or listening to people in the party with the result was delayed longer etc.

Unless there is absolutely no one else Trump is done
for me.

By then partly thanks to him as Doug points out his legacy
is we have both houses and WH controlled by political enemies
who will surely make much of the country suffer.

And corona not withstanding what happened unexpectedly at WH
is the last memory of him as President and we all know the last memory if usually the one that stands out the most .



G M

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Re: If would pray we get someone else , not Trump 2024
« Reply #1954 on: January 09, 2021, 09:34:47 PM »
Are you going to outvote the dem fraud machines and the millions of illegal aliens who will be given citizenship?


".Longtime supporters in Congress are turning. Millions of Americans who for years were willing to tolerate, often even celebrate, Mr. Trump’s brash behavior in the pursuit of reform or good policy, are less amused by the wreckage he has visited on party and policy. And they’ll be unwilling to go there again in 2024."

Quite frankly I am one who is not amused by losing the Senate possibly to miscalculations in the last 2 months by Trump .  He singlehandedly divided his own party with calling out Republicans in Georgia ,  slapping his most ardent supporter in the face (VP Pence ) at the end in desperation

he has burned endless bridges - who would want to work with him in '24?

and turning off many independents and out of no where calling for the $600 payday be raised to 2,000 dollars without thinking it through or listening to people in the party with the result was delayed longer etc.

Unless there is absolutely no one else Trump is done
for me.

By then partly thanks to him as Doug points out his legacy
is we have both houses and WH controlled by political enemies
who will surely make much of the country suffer.

And corona not withstanding what happened unexpectedly at WH
is the last memory of him as President and we all know the last memory if usually the one that stands out the most .

ccp

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Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces
« Reply #1955 on: January 09, 2021, 10:43:19 PM »
". Are you going to outvote the dem fraud machines and the millions of illegal aliens who will be given citizenship?"

it is a no brainer to me the election  was stolen
I am just saying banging your head harder against the wall dumb ass tweets and nauseating bombast and narcissism
is not the way to fight what we are up against .
we need to win over independents and having a spokesperson who is what Trump is pissed the off
He was great only when he stood by the policies like when he kept his big trap shut at the RNC with regards to yelling screaming calling everyone in sight he doesn't like names, because they don't like or agree with him

We expect strong leaders but not ass holes.

Just my view
If I had the answers on how to fight the tsunami of Leftist onslaught I could also probably figure out the unified field theory

That said the previous head up their assess Bushies are out with the long knives  going after Josh Hawley:

https://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article248346830.html

BTW
it will be interesting what Mark Levin has to say as I think he was pushing the elector thing too.
 
Andrew McCarthy has been mostly right all along even if I wish his conclusions were different . He often winds up explaining how we don't have the legal weapons to fight with .
OTOH we are up against such an onslaught it is hard just getting whipped and having to take it.

What should we do?

I can tell you now I don't see how bringing out weapons and start shooting is going to help
No chance that would not be put down .

 
« Last Edit: January 10, 2021, 12:06:40 AM by ccp »

G M

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Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces
« Reply #1956 on: January 09, 2021, 11:29:15 PM »
"I can tell you now I don't see how bringing out weapons and start shooting is going to help
No chance that would not be put down ."

I'm not advocating anything, but I do expect that many dems are going to find out how rule .308 works.


https://monsterhunternation.com/2018/11/19/the-2nd-amendment-is-obsolete-says-congressman-who-wants-to-nuke-omaha/





Crafty_Dog

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Crafty_Dog

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Small Wars Journal
« Reply #1959 on: January 21, 2021, 07:35:05 AM »




ccp

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David Gergen. speaking fee
« Reply #1963 on: February 08, 2021, 02:10:25 PM »
https://www.wsb.com/speakers/david-gergen/

I don't get it
we see him all the time on liberal stations mostly CNN
for many yrs
I have yet to hear him say anything worth one cent
Nothing insightful
nothing really imaginative
nothing we already don't know

yet he keeps getting thrown on to diss Republicans and lately of course anything Maga
as though his word means more then just anther asshole with a biased opinion.

Crafty_Dog

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George Friedman: The Crisis of the Medical Establishment
« Reply #1964 on: February 14, 2021, 08:43:34 PM »
February 11, 2021
View On Website
Open as PDF

    
The Crisis of the Medical Establishment
Thoughts in and around geopolitics.
By: George Friedman

It has been about a year since the world entered a medical crisis for which there had been no cure. For much of the pandemic, the best solution was to contain the spread of COVID-19 while scientists developed a vaccine. It required a radical restructuring in how we lived our lives. More, the nature of the virus was such that any of us could be infectious without being sick. Anyone could be carrying the disease, so it was best to stay away from everyone, or so the thinking went.

Humans are by nature social animals – not just in the pleasure we take in being with others but in the way we produce the things we need to live and the things we need to live well. I went on vacation last week and felt as if I were venturing into a strange and dangerous world unlike any I had lived in before. We took a walk down a street for the pleasure of passing by strangers – a real but hitherto unknown need. The street was crowded with others who shared the need. Walking down a street is dynamic. It isn’t fighter planes holding inviolable positions relative to each other. People change course, they stumble, they stop to look in store windows or at other people. Keeping six feet of separation is impossible. Unpleasant but not impossible was wearing a mask on a sweetly warm subtropical day, inhaling and exhaling my own damp heat.

There is a constant sense of danger, a constant feeling that the pleasure of a walk, and the infusion of a Goombay Smash (if you haven’t tried a double, do), is a reckless act that not only endangers your life but threatens our social structure. Humans cannot live their lives like Phil Connors did in “Groundhog Day,” a movie that depicts a man awakening every day only to relive the previous. It is a funny and horrifying movie. Life is finite; it can’t be put on constant replay, not knowing when the song will move on. This was, in effect, the consequence of the medical solution.

This was the first vacation I took in over a year, and I took it with a sense of reckless youth. It was a good feeling, one clearly shared by many. The use of masks was random, distances weren’t kept, bars were filled. These were not the know-nothing rednecks that are imagined to be the primary source of such behavior. They were the denizens of luxury hotels. The sense of joyous rebellion was clear. It occurred to me then that the world’s ministries of health would not declare the end of social distancing and masking but rather a new way to measure risk, and I think it is taking place now.

The virus is dangerous, albeit less so than, say, smallpox, diphtheria, cholera or Ebola, and the prevailing wisdom is that those younger than 65 years old who have no comorbidities are far less likely to die. The total number of dead is horrific in spite of this. During the polio epidemic of the 20th century, which primarily afflicted children, often killing or maiming them, doctors did not decree that all of society abort their normal lives. They accepted random disease as a possibility inherent in being human. We went on, and some wept. They knew doctors were working on a vaccine, but that work had been underway for years, and no one knew when or if there would be one. In the meantime, they lived their lives. Doctors didn’t demand that we suspend our lives for an unknown period. How long can you go without seeing your children and grandchildren, without going to a relative’s funeral or wedding, without constant awareness of the risks of living?

In the end, a polio vaccine was developed and the disease went away, but we were not expected to halt our lives in the meantime. When it was developed – I was about five years old – everyone was quickly and joyously given the vaccine. It is very important to see the different views not only of the disease but of the vaccine. Everyone embraced the polio vaccine. But vast numbers of people all over the world have declared to pollsters at least that they will not take the COVID-19 vaccine. Some are afraid that microchips to control us will be inserted. Others that the whole disease was invented to enrich Big Pharma. There are those who have rejected vaccines for a long time. But there are also now those who simply do not trust the medical community. Some fear the breakneck speed at which the vaccine was developed. Others believe that the medical establishment’s pretense to scientific rectitude is an illusion. In short, they believe doctors don’t know what they're doing. And this is compounded by the belief that the risk of the disease is less than the risk of the vaccine.

I am not sure where this distrust started. For me it was with eggs, a trivial matter. When I was young, I was given eggs to eat constantly. Then I learned later that eggs were dangerous for one’s cholesterol levels. More recently, I learned that on the contrary, they were good. For most of us, our contact with science is the media declaring the latest food to promise eternal life or catastrophe all announced with utter confidence. It seems to many as if they have no idea what they are doing but are at all times certain. My perception may be wrong, but it is a social force nonetheless.

I am certainly taking the vaccine. I also understand the dynamic of scientific research, and that at each point they were doing the best they could do. But the fact is that the only solutions they had at the beginning were unsustainable in the long run and failed to take into account the price those solutions imposed. In other cases, life went on and the individual could determine action. In this case, the world changed its shape to deal with the disease. And that imposed a disease of the sort medicine is not meant to deal with, changing the fabric of the lives we have built for ourselves. I saw while on vacation on the street the eagerness, even with risk, to get on with life. I also sense the distrust that, fairly or not, has grown between scientist and civilian. The unwillingness to take the vaccine is a signal of the problem.

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Lib Clooney going after Jim Jordan
« Reply #1967 on: February 23, 2021, 08:25:43 AM »
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/jim-jordan-george-clooney-ohio-state-sex-abuse_n_603490d9c5b67c32962018c5

I don't understand

if all these people supposedly knew what was going on
they could easily have fired the doctor and hired a new one

I have seen doctors losing their licenses for a huge amount less than this

of course I don't believe 20,000 + allegations either though
sounds like a gold rush to me.


ccp

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MSM go to the Leftist lawyers, Tribe et al
« Reply #1968 on: February 23, 2021, 09:55:07 AM »
for immediate phony "fact check" of Justice Thomas the print their email/phone call etc responses :

https://www.yahoo.com/news/dissent-justice-thomas-election-case-223407739.html


DougMacG

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Justice Thomas on the Dissent, Vote Fraud Case
« Reply #1969 on: February 23, 2021, 04:13:32 PM »
for immediate phony "fact check" of Justice Thomas the print their email/phone call etc responses :

https://www.yahoo.com/news/dissent-justice-thomas-election-case-223407739.html

Justice Thomas:

“Few things are worse for public confidence in elections than having the rules changed in the middle of the game (or after it). An epidemic of late-in-the-day changes to the rules was particularly corrosive in 2020. Courts are ill-equipped to referee those changes when partisan tempers are running hot. The Supreme Court just threw away its last opportunity to remedy that problem before the next election cycle. . . . This issue will not go away, and it may return next time surrounded by the same sorts of popular rage that led to the Capitol riot. This was the time for cooler heads to say what the law is.”

“An election free from strong evidence of systemic fraud is not alone sufficient for election confidence. Also important is the assurance that fraud will not go undetected.”



“That decision to rewrite the rules seems to have affected too few ballots to change the outcome of any federal election. But that may not be the case in the future,” Thomas wrote. “These cases provide us with an ideal opportunity to address just what authority nonlegislative officials have to set election rules, and to do so well before the next election cycle. The refusal to do so is inexplicable.”

Justice Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch dissented, too.

“If state officials have the authority they have claimed, we need to make it clear. If not, we need to put an end to this practice now before the consequences become catastrophic,” Thomas added.

“We are fortunate that many of the cases we have seen alleged only improper rule changes, not fraud,” Thomas went on to say. “But that observation provides only small comfort. An election free from strong evidence of systemic fraud is not alone sufficient for election confidence. Also important is the assurance that fraud will not go undetected.”

https://thetruereporter.com/video-justice-clarence-thomas-blasts-supreme-court-on-rigged-elections/


Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Some thoughts on the must read
« Reply #1973 on: February 27, 2021, 10:13:29 PM »
not totally analogous to Bolshevik Russia

as I think the proletariat that Lenin was opposed
would now be defined in modern US as who we call the elites and academics
and other privileged types

and from what I remember Lenin did not give a hoot about the poor or serfs
or the victims per se
he was champion of the workers
which is opposite of today wherein the workers , or in my mind , working tax payers are the enemies
of the state
not the other way around

Workers unite ! is more  phrase that Trump would use. (proletariat)

and the bourgeoisie I would think would not be the enemies of the state but the elitists and government  employees and academics who support the state

I agree with this statement:

"The answer of course was that the bourgeoisie nomenclature was inherently vague, by design, and the gulag did not differentiate between its political prisoners of one social class or another. If you were there, you were an enemy of the state."

I remember in Russian history classes and political science class ( I took of the former and one of the latter) no matter how hard I tried to figure out what was meant by the term " bourgeoisie" I could not grasp it.




 

G M

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Re: Some thoughts on the must read
« Reply #1974 on: February 28, 2021, 09:46:41 AM »
No matter what they claim, Marxism is always about the "elites" crushing the rest of the population.


not totally analogous to Bolshevik Russia

as I think the proletariat that Lenin was opposed
would now be defined in modern US as who we call the elites and academics
and other privileged types

and from what I remember Lenin did not give a hoot about the poor or serfs
or the victims per se
he was champion of the workers
which is opposite of today wherein the workers , or in my mind , working tax payers are the enemies
of the state
not the other way around

Workers unite ! is more  phrase that Trump would use. (proletariat)

and the bourgeoisie I would think would not be the enemies of the state but the elitists and government  employees and academics who support the state

I agree with this statement:

"The answer of course was that the bourgeoisie nomenclature was inherently vague, by design, and the gulag did not differentiate between its political prisoners of one social class or another. If you were there, you were an enemy of the state."

I remember in Russian history classes and political science class ( I took of the former and one of the latter) no matter how hard I tried to figure out what was meant by the term " bourgeoisie" I could not grasp it.


G M

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Crafty_Dog

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CS Lewis
« Reply #1977 on: March 28, 2021, 08:32:18 AM »

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Re: Political Rants & interesting thought pieces
« Reply #1979 on: April 19, 2021, 05:38:07 PM »
people are reading the forum .

I just posted how the swamp creatures are intermarried interbreeded go to the same elite castles estates neighborhoods yachts etc

So from the above "The Age of Over-Abundant Elites" is this



"Then the media makes useful idiots of us all, reframing as existential battles between good and evil what are really just internecine conflicts between elites who regard everybody else as serfs (in much the same way that I have always privately thought that World War 1 was, at it’s core, a family squabble among a pan-European dynasty that ruled by divine right).


Via Brookings Institute: The Family Relationships that couldn’t stop World War 1"