Author Topic: Education  (Read 240586 times)

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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Free Public education in the US
« Reply #601 on: June 14, 2022, 10:42:44 AM »
traced to Massachusetts circa 1837

https://www.thebalance.com/u-s-inflation-rate-history-by-year-and-forecast-3306093


Paine was ahead of his time
with the concept of school vouchers

though in other areas maybe more like a modern socialist.

ccp

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tom paine
« Reply #602 on: June 14, 2022, 10:53:45 AM »
May I add this from Wikipedia

-------------
State funded social programs
In his Rights of Man, Part Second, Paine advocated a comprehensive program of state support for the population to ensure the welfare of society, including state subsidy for poor people, state-financed universal public education, and state-sponsored prenatal care and postnatal care, including state subsidies to families at childbirth. Recognizing that a person's "labor ought to be over" before old age, Paine also called for a state pension to all workers starting at age 50, which would be doubled at age 60.[115]



Crafty_Dog

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Re: Education
« Reply #605 on: June 28, 2022, 07:39:33 AM »
Good news!

G M

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Lose with dignity to people like this!
« Reply #606 on: July 05, 2022, 11:58:50 AM »

ccp

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Tiara Mack
« Reply #607 on: July 05, 2022, 01:31:38 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiara_Mack

a Brown University grad !

BA in public health. 2016

yes twerking is good for the public's health

MA from BU in education 2018






ccp

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Re: Education
« Reply #608 on: July 05, 2022, 02:26:28 PM »
if only we could just twerk together .............


G M

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G M

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ccp

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Re: Education
« Reply #614 on: July 29, 2022, 07:29:03 AM »
funny

how when all we here from harvard and other academics etc is we need DIVERSITY!!!!

when
diversity of thought is discouraged.

G M

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Re: Education
« Reply #615 on: July 29, 2022, 07:37:21 AM »
funny

how when all we here from harvard and other academics etc is we need DIVERSITY!!!!

when
diversity of thought is discouraged.

That's the left's definition. Everyone marching in lockstep.

DougMacG

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Re: 1% of Harvard profs are conservative; only 16% "moderate
« Reply #616 on: July 29, 2022, 07:45:44 AM »
https://fee.org/articles/harvard-faculty-survey-reveals-striking-ideological-bias-but-more-balanced-higher-education-options-are-emerging/

this cannot be coincidence

how does this happen?

Beyond how does this happen, how do organizations maintain their prestige as their quality goes down the tubes.  Harvard, now a Leftist training center, UN corrupt, NYT worse than Pravda, Princeton home of Krugman, Nobel awards Arafat, awards Obama his first week, and so on. Yes, why does SO much BS for so long not fully destroy their reputation and prestige?

G M

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Re: 1% of Harvard profs are conservative; only 16% "moderate
« Reply #617 on: July 29, 2022, 08:07:30 AM »
https://fee.org/articles/harvard-faculty-survey-reveals-striking-ideological-bias-but-more-balanced-higher-education-options-are-emerging/

this cannot be coincidence

how does this happen?

Beyond how does this happen, how do organizations maintain their prestige as their quality goes down the tubes.  Harvard, now a Leftist training center, UN corrupt, NYT worse than Pravda, Princeton home of Krugman, Nobel awards Arafat, awards Obama his first week, and so on. Yes, why does SO much BS for so long not fully destroy their reputation and prestige?

It has. Our rotting system is just stumbling on by inertia now.



DougMacG

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G M

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Future teacher of the year!
« Reply #621 on: September 06, 2022, 07:50:59 PM »


DougMacG

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Education Bill, Josh Hawley
« Reply #623 on: October 04, 2022, 07:02:26 AM »
https://www.thecollegefix.com/bill-would-force-universities-to-repay-portion-of-student-loan-default/

Have colleges pay 50% of the default.  Seems fair and addresses moral hazard run amok.

Crafty_Dog

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WT: KY: Less than half at grade level
« Reply #624 on: October 19, 2022, 01:52:04 AM »
EDUCATION

Kentucky test scores reveal struggles caused by pandemic

BY BRUCE SCHREINER ASSOCIATED PRESS FRANKFORT, KY. | Education in Kentucky faces its own difficult recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, a grim fact revealed Tuesday by statewide test scores showing that many students from elementary to high school struggled across a span of core subjects.

Fewer than half of students tested statewide were reading at grade level, with even lower across-the-board scores posted in math, science and social studies.

Education Commissioner Jason Glass acknowledged there’s “no quick fix” to overcome challenges caused by the pandemic, when schools shifted to virtual learning and staff shortages were common. The recovery in education will take “time and resources,” he stressed.

“As expected, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on our students and our schools as they continue to recover from the interrupted learning that occurred over the past two years,” Mr. Glass said in a news release. “These assessment results will serve as the baseline from which we will move forward as we look to new and innovative learning opportunities for all of Kentucky’s students.”

Kentucky has received more than $2 billion in federal funding through the Democrat-backed American Rescue Plan passed by Congress last year. The funding aims to help accelerate learning and provide additional support to districts and the students who need it the most.

Kentucky’s results are consistent with what many other states are experiencing, Mr. Glass said.

In Kentucky, the test scores for the 2021-2022 academic year were released Tuesday by the state Department of Education. The assessments were given last spring to more than 383,000 students in grades three through eight and 10 through 11.

“It’s important for all of us to use this data responsibly to help inform parents and families about their students’ schools and to allow local leaders to target resources to communities and schools that need them most,” Mr. Glass said.

The results showed that 45% of elementary school pupils scored proficient or distinguished on their reading tests — indicating they are where they should be. Nearly the same percentage of middle and high school students tested at proficient or distinguished levels in reading.

Overall scores were worse in other core subjects. Fewer than 40% of students across all the grade levels tested scored proficient or distinguished in math. In science, the highest overall scores were at the elementary-school level, with 29% scoring proficient or distinguished.

State education officials cautioned that this year’s scores can’t be directly compared with previous tests because of changes to the test itsel

Crafty_Dog

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WT: What is the Return on Spending for Education?
« Reply #625 on: October 19, 2022, 02:00:56 AM »
Underfunded and understaffed: The reoccurring themes of K-12 public education

Funds and staffing should be adjusted to reflect a decline in enrollment, quality of instruction

By Dr. Keri D. Ingraham

Chicago Public Schools now spends more than $29,000 per student, up from $17,800 in 2020. This is despite an 8.9% enrollment decline over the same time period. Far from alone, school districts around the country are sharply increasing spending regardless of falling enrollment. It is not only an economic debacle, but student learning is plummeting during the spending spree.

In the fall of 2020, more than 3 million students around the country did not show up to school — a half million of those were kindergartners whose parents opted to forgo online school for their non-reading 5-year-old children. By the spring of 2021, public school enrollment decline grew to 4 million students — a staggering 9% decrease. The exodus is not slowing as the 2022-2023 school year is underway.

The consistent trend of students who have left K-12 public schools over the past three school years is that they are not coming back. Parents and students are witnessing firsthand the benefits of alternative educational avenues, such as private schools, home schooling, microschools, learning pods and virtual schools. Enjoying their new learning experience, the only aspect they miss from K-12 public schools is that they are “free” thanks to the heavy taxes extracted from all.

Even with the sharp enrollment decline, staffing levels have remained level or even increased. In no industry other than government are staffing levels maintained in the face of significant and ongoing customer decline. Downsizing is inevitable. But in K-12 education, in large part by the powerful teacher unions who are teamed up with Democratic policymakers, claims of understaffing are continuous, despite dwindling student enrollment.

As a case in point, Seattle Public Schools employs more than 7,000 adults, which translates to one employee for every seven students. Despite the school system’s 7½% enrollment downturn, it has not paused plans to hire more employees. With only 47% of the district’s employees operating as classroom teachers, the excessive staffing drives up the cost to taxpayers, equating to $22,200 per student without factoring in the capital budget funding.

The Seattle school district is far from alone with reckless spending in the face of shrinking student enrollment and less-than-stellar results to show for it. In 2021, the Los Angeles Unified School District passed a $13.8 billion operating budget for the 2021-2022 school year, a 62% increase over the prior year’s budget. The increase skyrocketed the per-student spending to $24,000 — a more than $7,000 increase within three years.

The same reality is true for New York City Public Schools. The largest public school district in the country chalked up $30,772 in per-student spending in 2020, while enrollment dropped 9.5%.

The Seattle schools recently agreed to a new three-year contract with the Seattle Education Association adding approximately 20% to the budget for primarily more pay and increased staffing. Yet their superintendent, Brent Jones, admits the district doesn’t have the money for the $228 million agreed-upon increase.

So where does this money come from to close the funding gap — more accurately described as the planned overspending deficit? Taxpayers, of course. Schools operate an overstaffing model, ignoring enrollment downturns because it positions them well to claim the education system is underfunded, which pulls on the heartstrings of lawmakers and voters.

It’s hard to argue against the emotional ruse claiming that “if you care about kids and your community, you’ll vote in favor of fully funding public schools.” In this narrative, no regard is given to the poor management of personnel nor the bloated school district bureaucracy and staff rosters. Furthermore, there is no accountability for more money for consistently failing to improve student learning. Nationally, as of 2020-2021, public school districts employ 135 adults for every 1,000 students, which is 7.4 students per adult — similar to the number in Seattle. In the early 1950s, the ratio was more than 17 students per adult. Since personnel costs are the largest school operational budget line item, it’s no surprise that there are annual demands for increased funding, even as more money is poured into the system. Put another way, there are four times as many administrators in our K-12 public education system than in the 1950s, creating an excessive bureaucracy that drains roughly half of the funding before it even has the chance to reach the classroom. Newark, New Jersey, provides a typical example of this inefficiency — the school administration absorbs more than $10,000 of the $20,000 spent per student. And when the funds finally reach the classroom level, there is little positive impact for students because much of the money is gobbled up by teacher salaries, robust benefits packages and lavish pensions — which teacher unions continue to champion as insufficient no matter how large. The next time you hear that public schools are underfunded and understaff ed, don’t fall for it. Washington state public schools average about $119,000 per year in salary and benefits for a nine-month work year compared with the statewide average compensation of roughly $56,600, which in most cases is a 12-month position.

And as we continue to pour more money and additional staff into the K-12 public education system, student learning performance over the past several decades has not improved. On the contrary, student outcomes have remained flat despite enormous funding and personnel expansion.

It’s time we stop the absurdity and redesign U.S. K-12 education to ensure that funding follows students, and parents are empowered to select the education avenue that will best serve their children. The resulting free market education landscape based on choice and competition would force schools to educate students more effectively and cost-efficiently or lose students and ultimately go out of business.

Taxpayers, parents and community members should demand higher returns for their $800 billion K-12 education investment. Our children and the future of our country deserve nothing less.

Keri D. Ingraham is a fellow at Discovery Institute and director of the Insti-tute’s American Center for Transforming Education

ccp

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Re: Education
« Reply #626 on: October 19, 2022, 12:24:55 PM »
all the spending in the world will not make more then a dent in poor school performance
if education is NOT valued, encouraged, enforced at the home

the multigenerational cycle
is unbelievable

blame it all on white racism

vote for dems because the are for "diversity" and promising "reparations" !

and their supposed leaders all think like this and have vested interest in keeping the con going.

all to keep minorities from voting for policies that will really help break the cycle of impoverishment


DougMacG

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ccp

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despite technology students score lowest in 30 yrs
« Reply #629 on: November 22, 2022, 02:31:54 PM »
https://townhall.com/columnists/townhallcomstaff/2022/11/22/why-are-our-students-failing-n2616225

our teachers unions don't speak much of this or at least it is not in the news if they do as much as they grandstand for Democrats

ask for more money
and blame corona despite the fact they helped keep schools closed


Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: The School Board Election Revolt Continues
« Reply #630 on: November 29, 2022, 05:58:42 AM »
The School Board Election Revolt Continues
Challenges to union control of local school governance were often successful.
By The Editorial BoardFollow
Nov. 28, 2022 6:36 pm ET

Journal Editorial Report: Florida's Gov. Ron DeSantis led the way for education alternatives. Image: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

It hasn’t received much attention since Election Day, but local school board races across the country continue to show welcome political ferment. More parents are refusing to let unions dominate education governance without a fight.

Exhibit A is Florida, where Gov. Ron DeSantis made a special cause of school board races. “We got involved to help candidates who were fighting the machine, fighting the lock-downers, fighting the forced-maskers, fighting the people that want to indoctrinate our kids,” he said in August.

Of the 34 candidates Mr. DeSantis endorsed in 2022, 29 have won. The parental-rights organization Moms for Liberty counts six Florida school boards that flipped to parental-rights majorities. That includes Miami-Dade County, where Joe Biden beat Donald Trump53.4% to 46.1% in 2020, and where Mr. DeSantis made two successful endorsements.

On Nov. 8 all nine school board seats were up for election in Charleston County, S.C., which went for Mr. Biden 55.5% to 42.6% in 2020. Moms for Liberty endorsed candidates for eight of the seats, and five won. One seat is still up for grabs after a candidate who wasn’t endorsed by Moms for Liberty won but said she had withdrawn from the race and left the state.

Tara Wood, the chair of Charleston County’s Moms for Liberty chapter, said parents wanted the schools to focus on essentials, but the old school board members were “all about social and racial justice” and championed “programs and curriculum that has nothing to do with reading, writing and doing math.”

Moms for Liberty says it also helped flip the school boards in South Carolina’s Berkeley County and the York County Rock Hill School District, New Jersey’s Cape May County and North Carolina’s New Hanover County. At least 114 of the 270 school board candidates Moms for Liberty endorsed won on Nov. 8.

The parental revolt even spread to Minnesota despite opposition from teachers union. Denise Specht, the president of the teacher’s union Education Minnesota, claimed in September that its “political program has been successful between 80 and 90 percent of the time when our locals make endorsements in school board races and carry out an aggressive voter contact plan.”

Yet 49 of 119 school board candidates endorsed by the Minnesota Parents Alliance won on Nov. 8. The alliance was formed in response to parental concern about learning loss and a desire to be more involved in children’s education. “The fact that our candidates did as well as they did” shows that “the parent movement really transcends politics,” says executive director Cristine Trooien.

November’s parental-rights outlier was Michigan. The state “had abortion on the ballot, and that turned out Democrats,” said Ryan Girdusky, the founder of the 1776 Project PAC, which opposes critical race theory in school curricula. Nationwide only 20 of the 53 school board and state superintendent candidates endorsed by the 1776 Project PAC won on Nov. 8, with the majority of their losses in Michigan. Yet in total this year 72 school-board candidates and one state superintendent candidate won among the 125 candidates the group endorsed.

Ballotpedia has identified 1,800 school board races where the Covid response or teachings on race, sex and gender were campaign issues. By Nov. 28 it had identified 1,556 winners. Some 31% of the identified victors opposed woke curricula or the Covid response, with some 37% expressing mixed or unclear opinions.


Teachers unions have an overwhelming political advantage in money and single-minded focus, especially compared to parents who have jobs and other obligations. That parents are winning any of these races is a minor miracle and speaks to the frustration produced by school lockdowns, progressive indoctrination in classrooms, and educational failure as measured by this year’s National Assessment of Educational Progress. Let’s hope this grass-roots political movement continues

DougMacG

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John Adams on Education
« Reply #631 on: December 01, 2022, 09:00:18 AM »
"It should be your care, and mine, to elevate the minds of our children and exalt their courage; to accelerate and animate their industry and activity; to excite in them a habitual contempt of meanness, abhorrence of injustice and inhumanity, and an ambition to excel in every capacity, faculty, and virtue. If we suffer their minds to grovel and creep in infancy, they will grovel all their lives."    - John Adams

https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2022/11/thought-for-the-day-john-adams-on-education.php


Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: MI teachers keep gender studies secret
« Reply #633 on: December 26, 2022, 09:47:59 AM »
Michigan’s Gender Studies Secret
A court says public-school teachers are exempt from FOIA.
By The Editorial Board
Dec. 23, 2022 6:04 pm ET


The Freedom of Information Act is a popular tool for taxpayers and journalists to hold government to account. But what if the FOIA law doesn’t apply to documents or communications among many government employees?

That’s the theory endorsed by Michigan state Judge Jacob James Cunningham, who ruled on Dec. 15 that the state’s Freedom of Information Act doesn’t apply to public-school teachers.

Carol Beth Litkouhi asked the Rochester community school district to give her more information about a school’s course on the History of Ethnic and Gender Studies. The school slowrolled her request, providing minimal information. With the help of the Mackinac Center, she submitted a FOIA request to see what students were learning in a class that her child might later decide to take.

The Mackinac Center’s interest is in transparency that “affords parents the opportunity to understand what their children are learning, and to fully engage with local government officials about these lessons.” The FOIA sought access to student assignments and reading for the class as well as lesson plans and other materials prepared by the teacher.

That sounds like a simple request, but the school district argued that teachers don’t count as public employees because they’re members of the teachers union, the Michigan Education Association, and thus don’t count as members of a “public body” under FOIA. Huh?

Judge Cunningham bought that argument, and he writes that the Michigan Freedom of Information Act is meant to apply only to public employees who work in the executive branch of state government, and thus teachers and their work product are exempt.

“Even assuming, arguendo, that public school teachers are ‘public bodies’ for the purpose of FOIA requests,” the judge writes, “a review of the court file, pleadings, briefs and evidence offered show RCSD has not prepared, owned, used, possessed or retained the documents requested” (bold in original). How is it possible, let alone logical, for a school district not to prepare, own or use documents that form part of its curriculum?

The school district’s goal here is to prevent parents from questioning what is taught. But public schools should be held to the same transparency standards as other public employees. Their work is funded by taxpayers and they are accountable to taxpayers and parents. Teachers’ salaries are publicly available, so why would their work product be different? The Mackinac Center is appealing the ruling.

Transparency from public officials is a core principle of democratic self-government. Educators know that schools thrive in communities where parents care about education and volunteer their time to help schools. The Rochester obstruction is an insult to the parents and taxpayers who pay their salaries.



ccp

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VDH on higher eductation
« Reply #636 on: January 03, 2023, 08:42:18 AM »
poor white males need not apply
unless they get a sex change and they get rocketed to the top of the list:

https://www.inverse.com/science/inverse-breakthrough-awards-science-microbiome-neuroscience-space

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Education
« Reply #637 on: January 04, 2023, 06:01:15 AM »
Is that the URL you intended?

DougMacG

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DougMacG

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Re: Education
« Reply #639 on: January 10, 2023, 12:04:42 PM »
Victor Davis Hanson on the collapse of American universities:

Nationwide undergraduate enrollment has dropped by more than 650,000 students in a single year — or over 4% alone from spring 2021 to 2022, and some 14% in the last decade. Yet the US population still increases by about 2 million people a year.

Men account for about 71% of the current shortfall of students. Women number almost 60% of all college students — an all-time high.

Monotonous professors hector students about “toxic masculinity,” as “gender” studies proliferate. If the plan was to drive males off campus, universities have succeeded beyond their wildest expectations.

The number of history majors has collapsed by 50% in just the last 20 years.

In the last decade alone, English majors across the nation’s universities have fallen by a third.

At Yale University, administrative positions have soared over 150% in the last two decades. But the number of professors increased by just 10%. In a new low/high, Stanford recently enrolled 16,937 undergraduate and graduate students, but lists 15,750 administrative staff — in near one-to-one fashion.

https://nypost.com/2022/12/25/the-woke-university-implosion-and-what-comes-next/

DougMacG

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Higher Education, This is what they're teaching
« Reply #640 on: January 12, 2023, 06:54:41 AM »
https://www.campusreform.org/article?id=20987

Penn State professor tells straight students to watch gay porn to discover bisexuality
On December 6, Penn State professor Sam Richards held a sociology class discussion titled 'Trans Issues, TERFs, and The Binary.' During class, he told students 'we are all at some level nonbinary.'
To prove we are all bisexual he instructed students to 'watch gay and lesbian porn.'
--------
The advent of video and online courses makes the content no longer a mystery.

Instead of making professors more careful, it is those who criticize who need to fear being investigated and banned from their platforms, if not fired or prosecuted.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2023, 07:00:25 AM by DougMacG »

ccp

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to "educate" you and me
« Reply #641 on: January 21, 2023, 06:21:52 AM »
https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/transgender-men-can-get-pregnant-174513259.html

https://www.healthline.com/health/different-genders

no wonder so many children are confused and mixed up

I imagine they are given homework assignments to go home and try to figure who/what they are .


Crafty_Dog

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DeSantis is right on African-American Studies
« Reply #642 on: January 24, 2023, 03:41:08 PM »
DeSantis Is Right on African-American Studies

Florida governor Ron DeSantis speaks in a neighborhood impacted by Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers, Fla., October 5, 2022.(Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images)
By RICH LOWRY
January 24, 2023 6:30 AM

With the state of American historical and civic knowledge in near collapse, who thinks high-school students need to be brushing up on ‘Black Queer Studies’?

Florida governor Ron DeSantis stands accused of a long parade of horribles to which has now been added a new count — allegedly opposing the teaching of African-American history.

Florida rejected the College Board’s pilot Advanced Placement African American Studies course, and the decision has been treated in progressive quarters like the curricular equivalent of George Wallace standing in the schoolhouse door.

White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre called the state’s decision “incomprehensible.” DeSantis wants to “block,” according to Jean-Pierre, “the study of Black Americans.” She noted, ominously, “These types of actions aren’t new, especially from what we’re seeing from Florida, sadly.”

Florida state senator Shevrin Jones, a Democrat, said the rejection of the course amounts to a “whitewash” of American history. Jones maintains that “we’re back at square one, seeing that we once again have to defend ourselves to be legitimate in America.”

Never mind that there’s obviously a difference between objecting to the ideological content of a pilot course that hasn’t yet been adopted and erasing the history of African Americans as such.

This is the typical game of pretending that the only way to teach the history of African Americans is through the tendentious political lens favored by the Left.

When red states push back against critical race theory, its proponents make it sound as if students will, as a consequence, never learn about the Transatlantic slave trade, the 13th Amendment, or Frederick Douglass.

This is preposterous. No reasonable person opposes teaching American history fully and truthfully. (In Florida, the controversial “Stop WOKE Act” itself stipulates that instructors should teach the history of African peoples, the Middle Passage, the experience of slavery, abolition, and the effects of segregation and other forms of discrimination.)

The problem is when the curriculum is used as an ideological weapon to inculcate a distorted, one-sided worldview, and here, Florida has the College Board dead to rights.

The College Board hasn’t released the pilot curriculum publicly, but, as conservative writer Stanley Kurtz and a publication called the Florida Standard have documented, it really goes off the rails when it addresses contemporary issues. The curriculum presents the Black Lives Matter and reparations movements favorably and recommends the writings of a clutch of writers on the left, from Robin D. G. Kelley to Michelle Alexander, without rejoinder.

Bias aside, with the state of American historical and civic knowledge in near collapse, who thinks high-school students need to be brushing up on “Black Queer Studies”? The curriculum explains that this topic “explores the concept of queer color critique, grounded in Black feminism and intersectionality, as a Black studies lens that shifts sexuality studies towards racial analysis.”

Surely, if anyone wants to marinate in this dreck, he or she can wait to do it in college, which specializes in wasting the time of students and spreading ridiculous cant and lies.

This is the more fundamental point. Such “studies” programs — African-American, women’s, queer, etc. — are intellectually corrupt and inherently biased at the university level and should be kept far away from the realm of K–12 public education.

It shouldn’t be a surprise that an AP curriculum developed with the input of practitioners of African-American studies at the university level would contain all the same perversities and warped ideas.

Florida should be commended for saying “no,” and other states that care about sound education should do the same.

African-American history is American history. It should be taught — and has been — as an inherent part of the American story. Only when we are confident that all students know that story should we be willing to entertain further specialization, and never if it is the poisoned fruit of “identitarian” courses at universities that take it as a given that their students should be encouraged to thoughtlessly adopt progressive attitudes and beliefs.

This fight isn’t about blocking history or erasing the country’s sins but drawing a line between hifalutin political advocacy and thorough, truthful instruction in the American past.

© 2023 by King Features Syndicate


DougMacG

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« Last Edit: January 29, 2023, 05:31:00 AM by Crafty_Dog »


G M

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