Author Topic: The Surveillance/Omnipotent State  (Read 7193 times)


Crafty_Dog

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FO: Section 702
« Reply #101 on: April 10, 2024, 11:12:43 AM »
(2) HOUSE MOVING TO PASS 702 WITH LAWMAKER PRIVACY CUTOUT: According to Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY), the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Section 702 reauthorization bill Congress is planning to pass by 19 April includes notification and consent requirements for any database searches that include personal information of a member of Congress.

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) said he will oppose a House rule vote on the bill, stopping a floor vote.

Why It Matters: This cutout is very likely intended to secure votes to pass this version of the Section 702 reauthorization bill. There is strong bipartisan support for a version of the bill that included a warrant requirement for FBI searches that include American citizens after it was discovered that the FBI conducted millions of possibly illegal searches that included at least one member of Congress. However, House Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA) chose not to bring that version of the bill to the Rules Committee. – R.C.

Body-by-Guinness

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Senate Votes Down FISA
« Reply #102 on: April 11, 2024, 04:00:56 PM »

Crafty_Dog

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DougMacG

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Re: My congressman, government surveillance
« Reply #104 on: April 15, 2024, 10:14:34 AM »
https://danbishop.house.gov/media/press-releases/bishop-stands-against-expansion-warrantless-surveillance

This is an issue where my own view has flipped perhaps more so than on any other.  In the early 2000s I believed the agencies needed every possible tool to stop terrorism. Investigating (suicidal attacks) after they happen isn't good enough.  And there was no real reason to believe our trusted agencies would misuse this potentially excessive power.

Now I fear the agencies more than I fear the terrorists.  The government agencies are not using the tools they already have to protect us, cf border wall, law enforcement, courts, prisons, foreign intelligence.

The agencies (deep state) have tragically proven themselves untrustworthy, often an enemy of the people. The list of evidence to support that is very long. IRS targeting, 'Russian collusion", false FISA warrants, lying to Congress, eavesdropping and so on. They have been personally and politically motivated at the highest levels, and conspiratorial, and our security is the victim. "Emergency" powers must end.  Amend the constitution if you want more federal power.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2024, 10:26:38 AM by DougMacG »

ccp

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previous post reminds me of this quote
« Reply #105 on: April 15, 2024, 11:17:04 AM »
The quote "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely"12is attributed to Lord Acton, a British historian and politician13. He wrote this remark in a letter to Bishop Mandell in 188713. He also added that "Great men are almost always bad men"423. The quote implies that power has a corrupting influence on those who wield it, and that the more power one has, the more likely one is to abuse it

Can anyone imagine if the Dems finish the job seizing full power and making us into one party country?

(their obvious goal)

The system was designed so the media would be an additional check on gov. power but that no longer exists for 90 % of the media .

« Last Edit: April 15, 2024, 11:19:34 AM by ccp »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Surveillance/Omnipotent State
« Reply #106 on: April 16, 2024, 06:41:21 AM »
Doug:

We have walked the same path here.

Crafty_Dog

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FO: House passes FISA renewal without warrant reform
« Reply #107 on: April 16, 2024, 04:27:14 PM »
(1) HOUSE PASSES FISA RENEWAL WITHOUT WARRANT REFORM: The House passed the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) Section 702 renewal bill in a 273-147 vote on Friday, 12 April.

The amendment to add a warrant requirement for Section 702 database searches of American citizens’ data was defeated in a 212-212 vote after House Speaker Mike Johnson (R-LA) voted to break the tie.

“I will do everything in my power to stop this bill” when it reaches the senate, Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) said. Wyden added, “The House bill represents one of the most dramatic and terrifying expansions of government surveillance authority in history.”

Why It Matters: Republican lawmakers who voted against the warrant reform amendment argue that a warrant requirement would undermine national security by slowing the process of collecting and analyzing data on foreign threats. However, the warrant requirement would have only applied to Section 702 database searches targeting Americans. The bill now moves to the Senate, which is likely to face bipartisan opposition ahead of the Friday deadline when Section 702 authorities lapse. – R.C.

Crafty_Dog

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WSJ: The 4th is not in jeopardy
« Reply #108 on: April 17, 2024, 08:33:57 AM »

The Fourth Amendment Isn’t in Jeopardy
A bill headed for a House vote would harm U.S. intelligence and law enforcement with little impact on privacy.
By
The Editorial Board
Follow
April 16, 2024 5:34 pm ET



There is no shortage of bad ideas in Congress, and too many have a chance to become law these days. An example is the Fourth Amendment Is Not For Sale Act, which would prohibit the U.S. government from buying digital information that would remain available to the likes of China and Russia.

The bill, scheduled for a House vote on Wednesday, would ban the government from buying information on Americans from data brokers. This would include many things in the cloud of digital exhaust most Americans leave behind online, from information on the websites they visit to credit-card information, health information and political opinions.

Our libertarian friends fret that letting the government buy data infringes on the Fourth Amendment’s guarantee against unreasonable searches. But the Supreme Court held in U.S. v Miller (1976) that “a person has no legitimate expectation of privacy in information he voluntarily turns over to third parties.” The Court updated Fourth Amendment law on tracking cellphone location data in Carpenter v. U.S. (2018), but the Not For Sale Act goes much further.

The Justice Department says the bill, sponsored by Rep. Warren Davidson (R., Ohio), would limit the ability of U.S. law enforcement to seek information online that often helps solve federal crimes, including hacks and other malicious digital acts. The bill also bans the purchase of records on Americans’ location information, a change that Justice says would hinder the ability to track missing children, hunt fugitives and investigate criminal networks.

The bill would force U.S. intelligence officials to avoid data that could include information on an American. That’s a burden on tools the Defense Department uses to protect foreign military bases and troops abroad.

In a letter to Judiciary Chairman Jim Jordan and ranking Democrat Jerrold Nadler in December 2023, the Fraternal Order of Police wrote that banning the use of digital information would end law enforcement’s access to “tools that generate leads into crucial and often complex cases.” The National Sheriffs Association says the proposal “empowers the cartels.”

The bill’s co-sponsors include voices on the extremes of both parties, including Rep. Andy Biggs (R., Ariz.) and Democrats Pramila Jayapal (D., Wash.) and Mr. Nadler. Let’s hope the sensible center prevails on this one.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: The Surveillance/Omnipotent State
« Reply #109 on: April 17, 2024, 09:24:47 AM »
https://cointelegraph.com/news/nsa-days-from-taking-over-internet-whistleblower-edward-snowden

A very savvy tech friend responds:

"No. Also Snowden lives in a house paid for by Putin and has security from Putin.  He is guy responsible for maybe 200 cia deaths from the documents he stole and then passed to China/Russia which led to multiple networks being revealed and the people killed.  So I always take any article like this quoting him with a big piece of kosher salt."

That said the part about seizing servers etc seems both plausible and frightening.