Author Topic: Gov. Ron DeSantis  (Read 27509 times)



Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #202 on: May 15, 2023, 06:38:50 PM »
Agreed!

I think/hope that with his actual accomplishments he is laying the groundwork for contrasting with Trump's perennial food fights.


G M

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #204 on: May 18, 2023, 09:24:51 AM »
Agreed!

I think/hope that with his actual accomplishments he is laying the groundwork for contrasting with Trump's perennial food fights.

For all his flaws and missteps, Trump was targeted by the one true branch of government. The one branch of actual government will not let DeSantis or RFK or anyone else really hold the levers of power.

At the federal level, all politics is just professional wrestling theatrics for the rubes.

Don’t be a rube.

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #205 on: May 18, 2023, 02:07:42 PM »
I would be a rube only if I did not recognize the possibilities.




ccp

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #209 on: May 20, 2023, 08:49:45 AM »
and the amazing part is a majority of citizens in America do not agree with the religion of woke

yet the power of the DNC-media-SiliconValley-Hollywood
woke MOB

would have us thinking it is the other way around


ccp

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the Second Ronald the first Italian America if President
« Reply #210 on: May 24, 2023, 05:28:09 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ron_DeSantis

Italians would finally break the glass ceiling!!!   :wink:

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #211 on: May 25, 2023, 01:01:42 PM »
Very strong one hour interview on FOX last night with Trey Gowdy.

Can we get our hands on this?

Crafty_Dog

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Gov. Ron DeSantis interview
« Reply #212 on: May 28, 2023, 06:54:49 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uGoWr1hspM

Would love to find:

a) His interview on FOX with Trey Gowdy;

b) His candidacy announcement video;

c) where to go to give him money

ccp

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Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #214 on: May 29, 2023, 06:18:20 AM »
Yes it is the first segment of it.  IIRC it went for the whole hour.

This is perfect to send to my 91 year old mom.  Thank you.

ccp

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #215 on: May 29, 2023, 06:55:28 AM »
regards to your Mom
 :-D

Crafty_Dog

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ccp

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politico
« Reply #218 on: June 26, 2023, 07:01:24 AM »
DESANTIS STUMBLES.  !!!!!!

is the claim:

https://www.politico.com/news/2023/06/26/ron-desantis-new-hampshire-00103519

he insulted a couple of girls by scheduling on the wrong day

wow - he is stupid - a disgrace - insulting yada yada.  :roll:

God I hate the MSM

ccp

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end automatic citizenship
« Reply #219 on: June 26, 2023, 03:04:48 PM »
to anyone who steps over the surveyed borderline

what was that movie that showed illegal stepping over the border crying with joy at then delivering the baby just inside the "foul" line?

https://www.newsmax.com/newsfront/desantis-texas-immigration/2023/06/26/id/1124981/

OTOH this is easier said then done......... is my understanding

Crafty_Dog

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« Last Edit: June 27, 2023, 06:48:23 PM by Crafty_Dog »

ccp

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abolish Dept's of Ed , Energy , IRS , and Commerce
« Reply #221 on: June 29, 2023, 03:29:22 PM »
https://www.conservativereview.com/desantis-supports-abolishing-the-irs-department-of-education-and-more-but-he-also-has-a-backup-plan-2662011767.html

I can only imagine the furor in the deep state over this.

IRS - 79,070 full time employees

Dept of Ed - 3,912

Dept of Energy - 14,000 federal employees and over 95,000 management and operating contractor and other contractor employees

Dept of Commerce - 47,000

total -  238,982

G M

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Re: abolish Dept's of Ed , Energy , IRS , and Commerce
« Reply #222 on: June 29, 2023, 03:47:30 PM »
Remember when Reagan got rid of the Dept. of Education?


https://www.conservativereview.com/desantis-supports-abolishing-the-irs-department-of-education-and-more-but-he-also-has-a-backup-plan-2662011767.html

I can only imagine the furor in the deep state over this.

IRS - 79,070 full time employees

Dept of Ed - 3,912

Dept of Energy - 14,000 federal employees and over 95,000 management and operating contractor and other contractor employees

Dept of Commerce - 47,000

total -  238,982

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #223 on: June 29, 2023, 04:33:02 PM »

DeSantis's vote as a Congressman in favor of a national sales tax instead of other taxes would have greatly vitiated the justification for IRS agents.

Crafty_Dog

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Gov. Ron DeSantis wealth numbers
« Reply #224 on: July 01, 2023, 03:10:38 AM »
Ron DeSantis, Who Touts Blue-Collar Roots, More Than Triples Net Worth
Book deal boosts Florida governor’s wealth, new filings show, but it still pales in comparison to Trump’s
By Jack Gillum Alex Leary
June 30, 2023 9:08 pm ET

On the presidential campaign trail, Ron DeSantis touts his blue-collar roots and how he joined the Navy instead of taking lucrative opportunities available to a graduate of Yale and Harvard. But as the Florida governor’s political power has grown, so too has his financial status.

State financial disclosures for 2022 released Friday show that DeSantis earned $1.25 million for a book timed to the launch of his presidential campaign, part of what a person familiar with the deal said was a $2 million advance. Now, his net worth is more than three times the $319,000 that he reported for 2021.

The assets put DeSantis, 44 years old, on par with some of his Republican rivals, but they remain paltry compared with those of the billionaire he is trying to defeat for the GOP nomination—former President Donald Trump.

READ THE DOCUMENT
Ron DeSantis’s Financial Disclosures
A Wall Street Journal review of DeSantis’s previous state and federal disclosures shows how, until his White House bid, he had far less personal wealth than other recent prominent Republican candidates. Before his February bestseller, DeSantis’s wealth largely included retirement savings and proceeds from home sales.

Trump, by contrast, has assets of at least $1.5 billion, federal data show. And Mitt Romney, the Republican standard-bearer in 2012, then had assets totaling at least $80 million.

DeSantis had been worth about $319,000 in 2021, according to the most recent data before Friday’s release. Previous figures took into account the salary he earned as a congressman, as well as the 2019 sale of his three-bedroom Jacksonville home. As governor, records show, he makes $141,400.

A spokesman for DeSantis didn’t immediately respond to inquiries seeking comment Friday.

When he resigned from Congress in 2018 amid a run for governor, DeSantis said it would be inappropriate to continue to accept a lawmaker’s salary given the time he would devote to campaigning. That isn’t the case now as he travels the country while running for president; legislators in Tallahassee recently changed state law so he wouldn’t have to resign, meaning he will keep the governorship and paycheck. DeSantis has said he continues to do the job he was re-elected to in November.


Former President Donald Trump has assets of at least $1.5 billion, federal data show. PHOTO: STEVEN SENNE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
DeSantis has cited his life in government—and, by extension, his comparatively modest income—as part of his everyman campaign pitch.

“I could have earned hundreds of thousands of dollars in law or finance,” he wrote in his 2023 autobiography, “The Courage to Be Free.” “But I decided to pass on that money because I wanted to serve.” While at Harvard Law School, DeSantis was commissioned in the Navy, and went on to serve in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps.

DeSantis is relying on his biography as the Florida-raised son of a Nielsen TV ratings box installer and nurse as part of an appeal to voters, and drawing a contrast with Trump. Ironically, Trump won in 2016 by appealing to working-class voters and they remain steadfast in support of him, while polling shows DeSantis does better with more educated and affluent Republicans.

As DeSantis has risen in politics, he has enjoyed the trappings of wealth.

He has long courted ultrarich donors, dating to his time in Congress, some of whom have lent him use of their private jets, at times drawing media scrutiny. An avid golfer, he has married fundraising and schmoozing with donors with rounds at top courses and exclusive locations. He has appointed numerous donors to key state positions and boards, a practice not out of step with what other governors have done.

DeSantis at times has grumbled about political consultants, lawyers or state officials making more money than him, according to several former aides.


Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis stopped in Iowa earlier this year during his book tour. PHOTO: JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS
His book was an immediate hit, ranking No. 1 on the Journal’s hardcover nonfiction list for the week ended March 4. Through mid-June, it had sold nearly 170,000 print copies, according to book tracker Circana BookScan, a strong performance for a presidential candidate. 

“It’s a rare political book filled with policy wins,” said Eric Nelson, publisher of Broadside Books, the conservative imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, adding that most candidates’ books “are about what the writer would do if they won office.” HarperCollins and the Journal are owned by News Corp.

The book highlights what he describes as his modest upbringing. When he arrived at Yale as a “blue-collar kid” in shorts and flip-flops, he said, he didn’t fit in with the crowd of students from families who were millionaires. While studying, he wrote, he worked various jobs around campus, including recycling trash and moving furniture.

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After graduation, he said his bank account balance stood at $101.24.

Once at Harvard Law School, DeSantis said he had the impression that many students were there simply to get their tickets punched to lucrative careers in business or law. DeSantis said he instead chose to serve in the Navy, starting on an ensign’s salary while carrying college-loan debt.

On Friday, DeSantis reported that he still had $18,628.66 in student loans.

Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg and Arian Campo-Flores contributed to this article.

Write to Jack Gillum at jack.gillum@wsj.com and Alex Leary at alex.leary@wsj.com

ccp

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #225 on: July 01, 2023, 08:19:32 AM »
"Once at Harvard Law School, DeSantis said he had the impression that many students were there simply to get their tickets punched to lucrative careers in business or law. DeSantis said he instead chose to serve in the Navy, starting on an ensign’s salary while carrying college-loan debt."

I asked
my nephew a Harvard law grad -  8-)
some questions -

are the students there really all brilliant - his response no, most just work real hard though he did add a few are.

I asked
if he knew Larry Lib - he says he knows of him but never had a class with him
I asked if he knew Dershowitz and he said he was something the to effect full of himself -

My nephew does real estate law and has become super successful - I am proud for my sister and him.

I am not sure about his politics .  He called himself once a social liberal and fiscal conservative like many like to think of themselves

But actually I hate that phrase

it is in my opinion not possible to be both in today's context

How can one be socially liberal which includes free this that , safety nets, spending into the bottomless well of hell - and at the same time call yourself a fiscal conservative ? -- YOU CAN'T`


Crafty_Dog

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A DeSantis hate piece
« Reply #227 on: July 05, 2023, 06:32:24 PM »

https://theintercept.com/2023/07/03/desantis-florida-supreme-court/

DeSantis Stacked Florida’s Supreme Court With Cronies Who Wage His War on Wokeness — or Else
Akela LacyJuly 3 2023, 5:00 a.m.
Shortly after Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis took office in 2019, the state Supreme Court threatened to dissolve the Florida Bar Association if it didn’t get rid of its diversity programs.

The court had taken a sharp right turn after DeSantis selected three new justices with the help of Federalist Society board co-chair Leonard Leo. Leo led a secret panel of advisers that vetted DeSantis’s judicial nominees before he took office.

The revelation came on the heels of a slew of news stories on conservative donors buying influence on the U.S. Supreme Court — where Leo, again, was among the conservative legal activists who helped to install a conservative majority. The top federal court has since made landmark rulings against abortion rights and in favor of business interests. And Leo isn’t done yet: He funnels money to a network of right-wing organizations orchestrating key Supreme Court cases on red-meat conservative issues.

In Florida, Leo was working to overturn a 40-year status quo of judiciary balance and restraint. The state Supreme Court had fostered an image of independence after corruption scandals that forced two justices to resign in the early 1970s. When DeSantis took office, concerns about improprieties disappeared. The governor has a long history with the Federalist Society — he was a member at Harvard Law School — and his judicial nominees are backed by the group.

The ideological project DeSantis is pushing Florida is no secret. He unabashedly appoints political allies to posts across the state. Such picks have shown up in the judiciary, nonpartisan election offices, and state boards that oversee public schools and colleges, medical practices, business, and real estate.

DeSantis’s appointments, budget decisions, and fundraising tactics have come under heightened scrutiny since he announced a presidential run last month. None of the appointments, however, eclipse the lasting change of his state Supreme Court takeover. DeSantis has named five of the court’s seven members, all of whom are members of the Federalist Society.

“I don’t think he’s appointing chumps, but he’s clearly put a more ideological litmus test on his justices than others have,” said Neil Skene, who published an official history of the court. Vetting justices by patronage was common starting under President George Bush in the early 2000s, Skene said, but DeSantis is at the vanguard of making purely ideological appointments.

WASHINGTON DC - APRIL 23 Leonard Leo speaks at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast in Washington DC on April 23, 2019. Leo is an Executive Vice President with the Federalist Society and a confidant of President Trump. He is a maestro of a network of interlocking nonprofits working on media campaigns and other initiatives to pressure lawmakers and generate public support for conservative judges. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Leonard Leo speaks at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast in Washington, D.C. on April 23, 2019.

Photo: Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images

He is not the first to award contracts to donors or administrative posts to political operatives, but DeSantis does it at an unprecedented scale. The thoroughness of his cronyism has had a chilling effect in Florida: There is a perception among politicians and residents alike that nothing can get done if you’re seen a DeSantis foe, said Barbara Petersen, executive director of the Florida Center for Government Accountability.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” Petersen said. Public servants are dismayed at what’s happening to their state, she said: “People are afraid of him.”

No Diversity Policies
After the scandals in the 1970s, successive Florida governors sought to improve the diversity of viewpoints on the state Supreme Court.

“The idea behind all of that, of course, is to make sure that all of Florida is represented on its highest court,” said Craig Waters, who worked at the court for 35 years and was its communications director until he retired last year. “It makes sure that a state Supreme Court does not become an echo chamber, but a true debate society. If you have members of a state Supreme Court that are careful of each other and watching each other, it prevents anything happening that might lend itself to a lack of public trust and confidence. It’s very important that the justices police each other.”

That stopped under DeSantis.

“What I see today,” Waters said, “is a court that lacks diversity and that lacks that internal policing mechanism that has served it so well in the past.”

Shortly after DeSantis made his first appointments, the court started chipping away at its diversity programs.

In 1949, the state Supreme Court founded the Florida Bar, an association that regulates attorneys. In the 1990s and early 2000s, the bar sought to diversify the judiciary along ideological, ethnic, and gender lines and to address judicial discrimination. The association convened a diversity symposium in 2004 and issued a report with recommendations to help improve diversity and strengthen its independence. In 2010, the Florida Bar created a committee to address diversity and inclusion.

When DeSantis’s allies arrived on the court, threats began coming down: The bar would be dissolved if it didn’t get rid of its diversity initiatives. Soon enough, the attacks proved effective. In 2021, the state Supreme Court ordered that the bar association amend its continuing legal education, or CLE, policy and eliminate a requirement for diversity among speakers and panelists in its continuing educational programs. The fight even made its way to the American Bar Association, which changed its own policies in April 2022 to bring the group into compliance with the rules imposed on the Florida Bar.

Florida Bar spokesperson Jennifer Krell Davis told The Intercept that the association had not changed its diversity programs, but that it adhered with the court’s order to eliminate diversity requirements in CLE programs. She declined to comment on a question about the court’s alleged threat to dissolve the association. “Our Leadership Academy, Path to Unity and Diversity grant programs (and others) continue to thrive under our Diversity and Inclusion committee,” Krell Davis said.

In February, the state Supreme Court went so far to dissolve the court system’s Standing Committee on Fairness and Diversity and eliminate its fairness and diversity training for judges.

The court’s public information Director Paul Flemming said the court’s opinion was self-explanatory. “The opinions of the Florida Supreme Court speak for themselves,” Flemming said. “I would refer you to what is written there: ‘Quotas based on characteristics like the ones in this policy are antithetical to basic American principles of nondiscrimination.’”

DeSantis Court Picks
How the state Supreme Court arrived here is the story of DeSantis’s picks. The court’s current chief justice, Carlos Muñiz, took an unusual path to the bench. He had previously been a Republican political operative and worked in the Trump administration as general counsel to former Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. Muñiz was deputy attorney general and chief of staff to former Attorney General Pam Bondi, deputy chief of staff and general counsel to the former Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives, and deputy general counsel to former Gov. Jeb Bush.

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When DeSantis took office, Alan Lawson, a conservative and the most senior judge on the bench, was in line to be the next chief justice of the court. Court staff had been preparing for his ascension and budgeting for his administration when Lawson abruptly announced in April 2022 that he would retire. Lawson went to work as a partner at a new law firm in Tallahassee run by Republican political operatives who had broken off from one of the state’s top GOP law firms, Shutts & Bowen. Lawson told the Washington Post his decision to leave court was purely personal.

That July, less than four years after he was appointed to the state Supreme Court, Muñiz became its chief. Lawson was the first justice to be passed over for chief despite his seniority since 1976, said Skene, the expert on Florida courts. “He was not of the solidly Federalist Society group and Muñiz was,” he said. “Muñiz had a much more political job before that.”

Another DeSantis pick, Renatha Francis, worked at Shutts & Bowen before she was appointed to the court in 2020. Her original nomination was nullified because she hadn’t been a member of the bar for 10 years, as required by the state constitution. She was nominated again in 2022.


Related
DeSantis State Government Appointee Holds DeSantis Fundraiser in The Villages
The web of allies and appointments DeSantis has woven across the state overlaps with and influences the court. In May, after another justice abruptly stepped down to take a job at a DeSantis-linked insurance company, the governor appointed Meredith Sasso to the state Supreme Court. Several months before, DeSantis had appointed her husband, Mike Sasso, to the board of the former Reedy Creek Improvement District, where the governor has been embroiled in a battle with Disney. DeSantis appointed Sasso and four other Republicans to the board in February, including a major GOP donor and a co-founder of the far-right group Moms for Liberty who is married to the chair of Florida’s GOP.

Four days after Meredith Sasso joined the bench, her husband resigned from the improvement district board. Had Sasso remained on, it would have raised questions about his wife’s ability to participate in court decisions related to Disney without presenting a conflict of interest.

Similar questions may soon face Charles Canady, another justice who was appointed by former Democratic Gov. Charlie Crist. Canady’s wife Jennifer was elected last year to the Florida state House and quickly co-sponsored a bill that would ban abortion beyond six weeks. DeSantis signed the six-week ban into law in April, but its implementation is pending an ongoing court challenge to the state’s current 15-week ban. Jennifer Canady has been floated as the state’s next speaker of the House with DeSantis’s blessing.

“That poses a really difficult kind of situation for Canady because basically every law that gets passed and might be up for court review will come through the House of Representatives,” Skene said. “It certainly creates this interesting proposition where husband and wife might be at the head of two different branches of government.”

Cronies Everywhere
What makes DeSantis different from his predecessors is that his actions are overtly political, said Ben Wilcox, research director and co-founder of Integrity Florida, a government watchdog. DeSantis has reshaped Florida politics far beyond the judiciary, from the boards of public schools to boards of medicine.

“Because DeSantis has such an aggressive agenda, that’s why you’re seeing all these appointments to school boards, universities,” Wilcox said. “He’s really trying to push his agenda in pretty much every chance he has.”

The governor, for instance, overhauled the board of trustees at the New College of Florida and installed conservative activists. One pick to the board was the architect of the war on critical race theory. The new board quickly fired the college president and replaced her with the former Republican speaker of the Florida House. He, in turn, tapped a GOP lawmaker — whom his office had previously suspended from a county position after he was charged with impersonating a law enforcement officer — to become the next president of South Florida State College.

The lawmaker, state Rep. Fred Hawkins, had no higher education experience, and the school lowered the education requirements for the position just three days before he submitted his application. Three finalist candidates withdrew their applications after the governor’s office contacted members of the board, the Herald Advocate reported. Hawkins got the job.

Hawkins would prove to be yet another loop in the tangle of DeSantis cronies. Before arriving at South Florida State, Hawkins sponsored a bill that gave DeSantis power to appoint the board for the Reedy Creek Improvement District, where Disney is based. The move came just under a year after DeSantis signed a bill to revoke Disney’s special tax status after the entertainment giant publicly opposed his “Don’t Say Gay” bill. Disney sued DeSantis in April, claiming the governor weaponized the state government to retaliate against it for making First Amendment-protected speech.

DeSantis also stacked the state’s two medical boards, including an appointment for a real estate broker whose wife DeSantis had installed in a real estate appraisal board. Both medical boards voted last year to ban gender-affirming health care for trans youth.

Lobbyists
DeSantis repeatedly leveraged his position to bully Florida political figures — from elected officials to lobbyists in the state — into supporting his ambitions and pet causes.

“What he is doing, and what is now being reported, is his shakedown of lobbyists,” said Petersen, of the Florida Center for Government Accountability.

DeSantis’s chief of staff organized government officials to solicit campaign contributions from lobbyists, NBC reported earlier this month.

“Shaking down legislators, you know: ‘Give me your endorsement, I haven’t signed the budget yet,’” Petersen said. “And damned if he did not retaliate against those people. You can see it in the vetoes. It’s stunning.”

The governor’s allies have also gone on to enrich themselves. In September 2020, shortly after former Florida Republican House Majority Leader Dane Eagle lost in the Republican congressional primary for a U.S. House seat, DeSantis gave him a new job. Eagle, a commercial real estate broker, was appointed as the executive director of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. In January, less than two and a half years into the job, Eagle announced that he would join the government affairs team at Ballard Partners, one of Florida’s biggest international lobbying firms, with extensive ties to Donald Trump.

“DeSantis continues to use his political position as Governor to feed the grift of his allies, by gifting them positions their unqualified for, allowing contracts to be diverted towards friendly vendors and pleasing donors with bills that he signs into law,” said Democratic state Rep. Anna Eskamani, who represents parts of Orlando, in a text message. “It’s unethical and feeds into people’s distrust of the Governor.”

With DeSantis’s budget for 2023 to 2024, critics saw a governor intent on funding his top causes at the expense of Floridians’ real concerns. DeSantis cut funding for projects to protect public lands and prevent flooding that were pushed by Democrats and Republican lawmakers who resisted his requests for endorsements in the presidential primary.

“It’s becoming more and more clear as all of this information is coming out that what he’s doing, he’s doing for the sole purpose of his political ambition — and to the detriment of Floridians,” said Petersen. “We’ve got real problems in Florida.

DougMacG

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #228 on: July 06, 2023, 05:33:36 AM »
The previous (intercept) hit piece seems almost like political humor piece, the Governor on behalf of the majority of voters is trying to run the state government against the will of the more experienced "public servants", aka deep state.

"the court started chipping away at its diversity programs."

"diversity programs", aka racial discrimination.
-------------------
In this piece, a writer tells the Disney DeSantis story in context. Odd that a kid oriented amusement park opposes parental rights in education or is politically active at all, and that any corporation enjoys special tax and other considerations no one else gets.  As pointed out below, leadership to fight that takes guts.

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/why-ron-desantis-disney-fight-matters
Fox News OPINION Published July 5, 2023
Why Ron DeSantis' Disney fight matters

I moved my family and two businesses from California to Florida because of Ron DeSantis' leadership
 By Dave Rubin | Fox News

Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis says 'the chance of us backing down' from the state of Florida's dispute with Disney 'is zero'Video
Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis says 'the chance of us backing down' from the state of Florida's dispute with Disney 'is zero'
DeSantis, who's expected to launch a presidential campaign next week, spoke during a stop on May 19, 2023 at the Red Arrow Diner in Manchester, New Hampshire.

The true test of leaders is when they put aside political self-interest.

In Florida, political self-interest rose to an all-time high, following endless calls for Gov. Ron DeSantis to surrender his fight against Disney and the woke mob. Disney, the largest employer in the state of Florida, has pulled the strings of Tallahassee politicians for over 40 years.

Those strings were finally cut when DeSantis became governor.

Most standard politicians would’ve caved to the public pressure overnight. Especially if they were even contemplating a run for president. But DeSantis didn't. And his display of courage and conviction in the fight against Disney is exactly why he should be the next president of the United States.

FOR DESANTIS TO BE PRESIDENT, HE MUST CONVINCE VOTERS HE CAN FINISH WHAT TRUMP STARTED WITHOUT THE CHAOS

Political memories are notoriously short, but let’s not forget: Disney took a shot at Florida first. The Florida legislature had passed a bill protecting children from sexualized content in classrooms, a law that earned the overwhelming favor of countless teachers and legions of parents.

With no working knowledge of the legislation, Disney attacked the governor for signing the bill into law.

Disney's Iger should 'stay out of politics' and focus on the company:
A handful of Disney employees pressured the company's then-CEO, Bob Chapek, into action. What followed was a familiar ritual: the woke CEO merry-go-round.

First you side with the social justice warriors and "take a stand." Then you learn that you've overstepped – and just sit right back down. Then, having ticked off pretty much everyone, you get slammed for sitting down after standing up. And then you get fired.

Thus, Bob Chapek was out, and another Bob – Bob Iger – returned to Disney. This is where most politicians might have left it. But Disney's intrusive and arrogant behavior forced a hard question: Why does Disney – a multibillion-dollar, California-headquartered corporation – get special tax treatments and handouts in the state of Florida? Why are they allowed to essentially operate as a pseudo-government in the state, and what permits Disney the access to corporate welfare unavailable to small businesses?

The answer was because the Sunshine State’s chief executives – including Republicans – had operated for decades sheepishly looking the other way on corporatism and gave them a pass because "it’s Disney."

But DeSantis decided to change the game. He bucked Disney of its unjust ties with the Florida government by revoking their special privileges with the state. Even though the left and corporate media painted this move as unfair, it wasn't. He was taking the crony out of crony capitalism and evening the playing field, as is the promise of America.

Republicans have spent years chirping about fighting big government and big corporations, but none have had the guts or political conviction to truly act on these issues. Not even Donald Trump. These "pet Republicans" as I often refer to them on my show, trade short-term election wins – that turn out to be losses – in the exchange for long-term bloated government.

Republican Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis
Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at a press conference at the American Police Hall of Fame & Museum in Titusville, Florida. (Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

What Ron DeSantis did in Florida is what Republicans should have done years ago.

Corporations like Disney are far too eager to lobby for tax breaks and be given special favors from Republican politicians – only to turn around and smear the right as soon as woke activist agendas get in their ears. Over and over, Republicans fall for the trick, debasing themselves before companies that send jobs overseas, poison the culture with insane left-wing ideology, and, in Disney’s case, push this toxicity on to young children.

DeSantis said "enough is enough." To do that in any year would have been a case study in political courage, but to do it on the cusp of a presidential run is a shining example of the leadership our country needs. We finally have a presidential contender we can count on to put Americans – not corporations – first.

Freedom-loving Americans are sick of those in the Republican Party who claim to be fighters. That unfortunately includes former President Trump, who talks a big game but falls short when it comes to not firing Dr. Anthony Fauci, attacking governors who didn’t lock down their states, not building a border wall, and recklessly spending our money. Trump even took his friend Bob Iger’s side and attacked DeSantis’ battle with Disney.

Trump had four years to check corporate welfare and wield the power of the Oval Office  to stop wokeness. But under his leadership, wokeness only metastasized. He folded on this critical battle.

Unlike Trump, DeSantis stood unapologetically strong. He protected children from sexualized classrooms. He stood up for small businesses and students during the COVID lockdowns. He reduced crime and curved illegal immigration in the state of Florida. And, most of all, he does not back down from the toughest battles against powerful corporations when they are harming American families.

Ron DeSantis says what he means, and does what he says. Which is all the more reason Americans ought to make him their standard-bearer against Joe Biden. Because it isn't enough to have faux courage on social media. You've got to display actual courage – even when the odds are against you.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2023, 05:54:20 AM by DougMacG »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #229 on: July 06, 2023, 07:29:52 AM »
Saw Dave Rubin on FOX this morning describe Trump "as gas lighting his own base" with his attacks on RDS and the nomination race is between "the tortoise and the hare".


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WSJ: DeSantis Immigration Law is a Misfire
« Reply #230 on: July 06, 2023, 06:16:54 PM »
What say we?
============================

Florida’s Immigration Law Is a Misfire
DeSantis’s crackdown will exacerbate the state’s labor shortage while doing nothing to fix Biden’s border failures.
By
The Editorial Board
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Updated July 6, 2023 6:41 pm ET

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis’s economic record may be the biggest selling point of his presidential campaign. Yet he’s doing neither his state nor his campaign a favor with an immigration crackdown that looks excessive and may do economic damage in the fast-growing state.

Mr. DeSantis signed legislation in May that he claimed would “combat Biden’s border crisis.” But the law, which took effect last week, does nothing to stem the flood of migrants taking advantage of the Biden Administration’s lax border enforcement and asylum-law loopholes. It will, however, worsen labor shortages.

The law requires employers with 25 or more workers to use the U.S. government’s E-Verify system to confirm the legal status of new hires. Those who don’t can be fined $1,000 a day. Businesses that “knowingly” employ undocumented immigrants can have their state licenses and permits revoked. Many employers may lay off workers they suspect are illegal to protect themselves.

An estimated 772,000 undocumented immigrants lived in Florida in 2019, many of whom have been there for years and contribute significantly to the state economy. Construction, agriculture and hospitality depend heavily on undocumented workforces, not least because of a shortage of U.S. workers for such lower-wage and -skilled jobs.

Employers in these industries are reporting that they have been losing long-time employees and can’t find new ones to replace them. Many workers who are here illegally are worried they will be found out, and some are moving to other states. A quarter to half of workers have reportedly gone missing from some construction sites in South Florida.

Florida is a top producer of tomatoes, oranges and avocados, yet about half of crop farm workers lack legal immigration status. One grower in Homestead told Noticias Telemundo that she has struggled to find workers since the law passed. “South Florida’s economy here in Homestead is agriculture. Most of them we know are undocumented,” she said. “Who’s going to harvest?”

Demand for services and housing are surging amid Florida’s population boom. That means more workers are needed to build homes, change hospital beds, serve nursing home patients meals, and keep restaurants open. Employers can raise wages only so much and stay in business, assuming they can find any workers. This will dent the state’s economic expansion, which has produced a jobs and tax-revenue boom and an affordable standard of living for nearly everyone.

Florida ranked second in state job growth over the last year after only Texas. Its 2.6% unemployment rate is near a record low. In Miami unemployment is 1.8%. In other words, Florida already suffers from a severe labor shortage, and now it will get worse.

Mr. DeSantis’s campaign immigration plan also parrots the restrictionist right’s lump of labor fallacy that illegal immigrants are taking U.S. jobs and reducing wages of America’s working class. This is contradicted by Florida’s experience and many economic studies. His plan also neglects the need for more legal pathways for migrants, which would help reduce illegal immigration.

Mr. DeSantis is right to lambaste the Biden Administration and Congress for their immigration failures. They have polarized the issue politically, and made solutions much more difficult. But it makes no sense for Mr. DeSantis to punish his own state even as he vows to clean up the mess in Washington.

DougMacG

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Re: WSJ: DeSantis Immigration Law is a Misfire
« Reply #231 on: July 06, 2023, 06:58:45 PM »
"What say we?"

"Mr. DeSantis’s campaign immigration plan also parrots the restrictionist right’s lump of labor fallacy that illegal immigrants are taking U.S. jobs and reducing wages of America’s working class."

(Doug) And they parrot the old talking point that we need illegals to pick fruit etc, with no regard for the rule of law.

I'm with DeSantis on this. Send the illegals to the blue States until they cry uncle.  If restrictive immigration laws need to be rewritten, rewrite them. We want a border.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2023, 07:05:31 PM by DougMacG »

Crafty_Dog

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #232 on: July 07, 2023, 06:16:03 AM »
Agreed.

AND, speaking from the perspective of forty years in LA, there will be serious adjustments to be made, not only in agriculture but also construction, restaurants, maintenance, etc.

I remember getting my son a job as a construction laborer with a student/friend who was a general contractor.

"You sure about this?  In this work white people (his crew was latino of mixed legality and he paid in cash) don't last."

And so it was.  My son lasted about a month.

BTW there are permits for temp ag workers.  If too cumbersome some tweaks should be made.

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Mark Levin endorses DeSantis, America's Governor
« Reply #233 on: July 13, 2023, 05:37:48 AM »
Extended interview on yesterday's show.

Will look for transcript or audio video.

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question for Dough
« Reply #234 on: July 13, 2023, 05:55:10 AM »
I only heard a few minutes of the interview
at the end where he calls DeSantis a "great guy"

on way to store yesterday.


Did he endorse him OVER Trump ?

or is he endorsing both ?


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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #235 on: July 13, 2023, 06:00:30 AM »
I only heard a small part. He didn't formally endorse but made clear that is our best choice.

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #236 on: July 13, 2023, 06:18:25 AM »
 8-) :-D

take THAT MAGA heads

Trump will attack Mark with dumb tweets now ............. Mark is a true warrior

the tweets will bounce off his steel chest!

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #237 on: July 15, 2023, 05:50:08 PM »
Transcript will be appreciated.

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #239 on: July 19, 2023, 05:35:42 AM »
agreed
I enjoy listening to him !   :-D
Unlike the tired loser BS artist .

Ron gets attacked mercilessly from both MAGA nuts and progressive nuts

through a complicit media and shysters.

Tapper was reasonable with honest questions and did not press negative follow ups designed to make the interviewee look bad

Unlike the rest at CNN who would have
 but what about this.
 "your critics say that about you"

etc.

Ron was ready !
he continues to learn and improve ........


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Gov. Ron DeSantis narrowing the Gap in the early States
« Reply #240 on: July 19, 2023, 06:04:11 AM »
"I enjoy listening to him !"

   - They told Bobby Jindal he was too smart and talked too fast and when he tried to slow it down he became boring. We will see how people like getting to know Ron DeSantis. He doesn't need to run as an anti-trump or to the right of trump, he needs to run against Biden and the Left machine every minute of every day.  He is certainly not a clone of Biden policies, as some with the "uniparty" allegation might suggest.  He has experience in military and served in Congress, but he is most certainly not a creature of Washington DC.
-----------------------
Latest New Hampshire poll and maybe the last pole before the new indictment come, Trump 37, DeSantis 23.  That is not an insurmountable early lead.

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #241 on: July 19, 2023, 02:31:26 PM »
14 points? Compared to 30+ elsewhere? 

And NH is very much a state where voters get to know a candidate.


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Was the benefit of Trump's endorsement
« Reply #245 on: July 25, 2023, 02:07:51 PM »

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WSJ: DeSantis was right
« Reply #246 on: July 25, 2023, 07:13:16 PM »
The Real DeSantis Covid Record
Trump and the left are distorting Florida’s superior pandemic performance on public health and limiting harm from lockdowns.
By  The WSJ Editorial Board

Progressives want Donald Trump to win the GOP nomination, which explains why they’re distorting Ron DeSantis’s Covid record. The press knows the Florida Governor’s opposition to lockdowns is a political selling point, so in Trumpian fashion they are rewriting history.


Democrats have never forgiven Mr. DeSantis for defying the lockdown consensus and reopening his state in spring 2020. Americans can recall—though would probably rather forget—how the Trump Administration extended its “15 days to slow the spread” again and again.

Mr. DeSantis and some other GOP Governors, notably Brian Kemp in Georgia and South Dakota’s Kristi Noem, broke ranks in early May by easing virus restrictions. Democrats denounced Mr. DeSantis for “letting it rip,” but he reopened the state in phases and took into account the healthcare system’s capacity to treat sick patients.

On May 4 restaurants and retail stores were allowed to open at 25% of capacity. Two weeks later Mr. DeSantis announced that theme parks, including Disney World, could submit plans to reopen as early as June if they could keep patrons safe. In June Mr. DeSantis gradually eased other restrictions.

That summer Covid swept Florida and southern states that had largely dodged a first wave in the spring. But Mr. DeSantis, having examined the data and consulted scientists such as Stanford University’s Jay Bhattacharya, refused to shut down businesses. Instead he focused on protecting the elderly who faced immensely higher risk.

Seniors over the age of 75 years were hundreds of times more likely to die of Covid than young adults. And lockdowns disproportionately harmed young people who were more likely to die of drug overdoses than Covid. The public-health clerisy focused narrowly on virus risks, ignoring the social, economic and psychological damage from lockdowns.

Not least of these was learning loss from school closures, which may never be made up. Mr. DeSantis was among the few Governors to reopen schools for in-person learning in autumn 2020 despite opposition from the teachers’ unions. His reopening mitigated learning loss and helped parents return to work.

Mr. DeSantis’s strategy of focused protection was articulated in the Great Barrington Declaration, which progressives still revile despite its vindication. In 2020 Florida had the tenth lowest age-adjusted Covid death rate in the country, which was nearly 20% lower than California’s despite the Golden State’s prolonged lockdown.

Progressives are implicitly conceding Mr. DeSantis’s strategy of focused protection succeeded by attacking him now for allegedly equivocating on vaccines. The smear is that the Governor at first backed Covid vaccines for seniors, but then declined to mandate the shots. He also didn’t hector young people to get them.

This ignores that many young people already had natural immunity, which is more protective than vaccines. Vaccines can also cause myocarditis in young men, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was slow to acknowledge. It also became clear by summer 2021 that vaccines provided only transitory protection against infection.

News stories attribute Florida’s higher death rate during the summer 2021 Delta wave to Mr. DeSantis’s refusal to embrace vaccine mandates. But they leave out that Florida also suffered a much smaller Covid wave in the previous winter than most states. As we’ve learned, infections build population-level protection that extends many months.

Florida experienced a lower Covid death rate than most states in late 2021 and early 2022. The press likes to cherry-pick data and focus on discrete periods to present Mr. DeSantis as a grim-reaper. But Florida’s overall age-adjusted Covid death rate during the pandemic is 13% lower than the U.S. average and about the same as California’s.

Florida’s vaccination rate among seniors is 94.4%, similar to most Democratic-run states. About 79.6% of Floridians age 18 and over have received two doses, which is higher than most states, including many with Democratic Governors such as Michigan (71.6%), North Carolina (77.1%), and Wisconsin (77.7%).

Progressives and Mr. Trump also won’t concede that Mr. DeSantis’s Covid strategy proved to be an economic boon. Between April 2020 and July 2022, 622,476 people moved to Florida from other states, including families who wanted children in school. Employment in Florida has grown by 7.4% since January 2020 versus 2.5% in California and a 1.2% decline in New York.

The lockdown damage continues, but progressives can’t admit they were wrong. Nor can Mr. Trump. So they are trying to take down Mr. DeSantis for being right.

ccp

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Re: Gov. Ron DeSantis
« Reply #247 on: July 26, 2023, 07:50:52 AM »
"The Real DeSantis Covid Record
Trump and the left are distorting Florida’s superior pandemic performance on public health and limiting harm from lockdowns."

I don't think Trump claiming he did a good job during the pandemic is a winner  :roll:

That said , once the virus cat was out of the bag ,  it was curtains no matter what we did.

Should have listened to GM on that one.  He was right. 

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C Christie bashes DeSantis
« Reply #248 on: July 26, 2023, 08:35:44 AM »
https://news.yahoo.com/chris-christie-criticizes-ron-desantis-124246776.html

 Presidential candidate and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie went after one of his 2024 Republican primary rivals, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, for his reaction to new education standards approved by Florida’s Board of Education last week.

The new standards require teachers to instruct “how slaves developed skills which, in some instances, could be applied for their personal benefit.” When CNN asked DeSantis about the standards, he said last week, “I didn’t do it and I wasn’t involved in it.”

Christie assailed DeSantis for not taking responsibility for the material and called the problem one of his own making.

“‘I didn’t do it, and I’m not involved in it’ are not the words of leadership,” Christie said Sunday on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

Christie laid the blame at DeSantis’ feet for signing the Stop WOKE Act in 2022, a bill limiting how gender and race are discussed in schools.

“Governor DeSantis started this fire with the bill that he signed. And now he doesn’t want to take responsibility for whatever is done in the aftermath of it. And from listening and watching his comments, he’s obviously uncomfortable.”



------


FUNNY , I DON'T RECALL CHRISTIE TAKING RESPONSIBILITY FOR BRIDGE GATE AND DUMPED IT ON STAFF LYING THROUGH HIS TEETH.

this guy keeps climbing out of the Arctic ocean water to wallow up onto the icy beach to get some sun.

Like he did at his beach house - after closing the beaches for the rest of the population of NJ

If this guy really took responsibility for leaving governorship with an approval rating of 27 % he would simply leave us alone.

Peggy Noonan will be just about the only one who will vote for him

though she is probably a Democrat ........

I wonder if another supposed Republican
an - Margaret Hoover - would vote for him.

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WSJ: DeSantis at a crossroads
« Reply #249 on: July 28, 2023, 10:08:49 AM »
Ron DeSantis at a Crossroads
Will the Florida Governor broaden his campaign message?
By
The Editorial Board
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Updated July 27, 2023 10:12 pm ET

The headlines say Ron DeSantis’s presidential campaign is in an unrecoverable dive, even as the primaries are months away. But the Florida Governor can still decide to run as the successful executive he is, if he broadens his public appeal and articulates a governing vision and agenda to revive the country.


Gov. DeSantis has let go about one-third of his campaign staff, as the press has noted with obvious delight. The Governor is polling at about 18% in the Real Clear Politics average, down from 30% in January. Democrats have since made an in-kind donation to Donald Trump’s campaign by indicting the former President, which no doubt revived some of his support in the polls.

***
Why isn’t Gov. DeSantis breaking through? Florida is booming, and Americans are pouring over the border seeking asylum from progressive states. The Governor was brave and correct on a major test of executive leadership: The Covid-19 pandemic. He had the courage to open schools and businesses in 2020, and he was vindicated on the merits and rewarded by voters. He’s won the Hispanic voters Republicans need to prevail in national politics.

The mystery is why the Governor has been running a narrow campaign aimed at a fraction of GOP primary voters. An illustration was the odd decision to launch his campaign in a Twitter chat with Elon Musk. Most Americans have the good sense not to spend time on Twitter, and he missed a chance to introduce himself to new voters in a speech that explained his reasons for running.

The Governor has too often catered to putative conservative populists who want to unleash the force of government to “own the libs” and win the culture war. Take the example of Bud Light. The beer’s sales have been in free fall since a brouhaha involving a marketing campaign and a transgender social media personality.

Gov. DeSantis might have simply noted that Americans don’t want to be lectured about gender identity while drinking beer, and offered the case as a cautionary tale for corporate executives wading into live political debates. Mission accomplished. But no. The Governor is now threatening to pummel Anheuser-Busch InBev with lawsuits.

This week the Governor has been hooted down for floating in an interview that as President he might unleash anti-vaccine crusader Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. on the Food and Drug Administration or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Running against the measles vaccine is not a platform that will excite suburban America. Many voters will conclude Mr. DeSantis is simply pandering to what a small but loud faction of Republicans wants to hear.

This was an unforced error that raises larger questions about the Governor’s ability to beat Mr. Trump. The former President is a target-rich environment for criticism. But Mr. DeSantis has for some reason decided to attack Mr. Trump on vaccines and as a “pioneer” in promoting “gender ideology.”

Gov. DeSantis is set to give a speech on the economy, and it’s an opportunity for a fresh start. Americans don’t feel better off than they were four years ago, and President Biden’s gusher of federal spending that fueled inflation is one reason.

Mr. DeSantis can flesh out his “great American comeback” into a plan for price stability, lower taxes for all rather than for the politically favored, lower prices from unleashing American energy, and healthcare reform to give Americans more choices. He can set a target of 3% growth in GDP without inflation to lift the real wages of all Americans.

He can also connect economic revival with restoring American defenses in a dangerous world. The Governor has said China is the biggest threat to America, and he’d be doing the country a favor if he made rebuilding a vulnerable military and winning economic competition with China a central theme. So far he’s settled for gimmicks like blocking the purchase of U.S. land by Chinese nationals.

***
Gov. DeSantis’s many accomplishments in Florida—on school choice, public unions, and more—will have greater political resonance when they are part of a larger message of national renewal. The Governor can’t beat Mr. Trump by running as a more competent, sane version of Trump. He has to offer voters something better.

Mr. DeSantis turned a narrow first gubernatorial win into a blowout re-election in a competitive state. A record that compelling would be a terrible thing to waste on a campaign based on right-wing grievances.

Correction: An earlier version mistakenly said Mr. DeSantis has criticized Donald Trump’s views on same-sex marriage